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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
upprised to learn that a new edition has been called for. Our living and our dead. The editor and proprietor, Colonel S. D. Pool, has donated to our library three beautifully bound volumes of this magazine, which he has been publishing in Raleigh, North Carolina. It contains a great deal of historic value, and is a highly prized addition to our library. Books received. We acknowledge the receipt of the following books, which will be noticed more fully hereafter: From D. Appleton & Co., New York: Cooke's Life of General R. E. Lee. A military biography of Stonewall Jackson. By Colonel John Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue, &c.), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. General Joseph E. Johnston's Narrative. Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. Sherman's Memoirs and Shuckers' Life of Chief justice Chase. From the publishers, Harper Brothers, New York (throu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
Book notices. Cooke's Life of General R. E. Lee. D. Appleton & Co., New York. This book was published in 1871, and has been so long before the public that it need now receive no extended review at our hands. Colonel Cooke wields a facileohn Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. D. Appleton & Co., New York. Cooke's Life of Jackson was originally published during the war, and was rewritten, and republishto be corrected. Personal Reminiscences. Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. D. Appleton & Co., New York. We cannot, of course, give an unbiased judgment of this book. But we may say this, that the letter seen, and that the publishers have gotten up the volume in superb style. General Joseph E. Johnston's Narrative. D. Appleton & Co., New York. General Johnston wields one of the most graceful, trenchant pens of any man who figured in the la
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
Book notices. Memoirs of General William T. Sherman. By Himself, D. Appleton & Co., New York. Every intelligent Confederate soldier ought to read this book, and many of them have done so. In spite of the rough, often coarse, and sometimes profane style, it is certainly a very readable book. And as a personal narrative of the commander of one of the principal Federal armies it must always command a certain sort of attention. But General Sherman's worse enemies could wish him no gre appropriate divisions of each monograph, in three volumes, constituting the present series. It may be obtained by addressing the author, Dr. Jos. Jones, box 1500, New Orleans. Life of Chief justice Chase. By J. W. Schuckers. New York: D. Appleton & Co. As private secretary and intimate friend of Mr. Chase, Mr. Schuckers has brought to his task very full materials which he has woven into a deeply interesting story of the busy life of one of the ablest men this country has ever produ
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
f War. Upon the fall of New Orleans, public indignation compelled a change, and he was made Secretary of State. A man of great fertility of mind and resource and of facile character, he was the factotum of the President, performed his bidding in various ways, and gave him the benefit of his brains in furtherance of the views of Mr. Davis. Mr. Davis's reasons for the selection of the members of the first Cabinet are given in his Rise and fall of the Confederate Government ( New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1881), Vol. I., pp. 241-3, in these words: After being inaugurated, I proceeded to the formation of my Cabinet, that is, the heads of the executive departments authorized by the laws of the Provisional Congress. The unanimity existing among our people made this a much easier and more agreeable task than where the rivalries in the party of an executive have to be consulted and accommodated, often at the expense of the highest capacity and fitness. Unencumbered by any other co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
his power by summarily removing me from a high command. Believing that he was prompted to this act by animosity, and not by dispassionate opinion, I undertake to prove this animosity by many extracts from his Rise and fall of the Confederacy (D. Appleton & Co.: 1881), and my comments thereon. Mr. Davis recites ( Rise and fall, I., p. 307) the law securing to officers who might leave the United States Army to enter that of the Confederacy the same relative rank in the latter which they had believe that that conference attracted no public attention, and brought criticism upon no one. I have seen no notice of it in print, except the merely historical one in a publication made by me in 1874, See Johnston's narrative (New York: D. Appleton & Co.), pp. 78, 79. without criticism or comment. In the same paragraph Mr. Davis expresses surprise at the weakness of the army. He has forgotten that in Richmond he was well informed of the strength of the army by periodical reports, wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
of this subject, see The life of General Albert Sidney Johnston, by William Preston Johnston (D. Appleton & Co.), upon which Colonel Johnston has drawn freely in the preparation of this paper.-editorxotic, but characteristic; he From the Life of General A. S. Johnston, by W. P. Johnston. (D. Appleton & Co.) had done the same thing in his victories on the Neches in 1840. he then gave General and odium. Nothing short of From the Life of General A. S. Johnston, by W. P. Johnston. (D. Appleton & Co.) complete and overwhelming victory would vindicate him in differing with so famous a Gelt. A breathing — spell, and From the Life of General A. S. Johnston, by W. P. Johnston. (D. Appleton & Co.) the shattered command would gather itself up and resume its work of destruction. Thesdid so until Wallace received from the Life of General A. S. Johnston, by W. P. Johnston. (D. Appleton & Co.) his fatal wound and Prentiss was surrounded and captured with nearly three
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
imperative the swift concentration of all our then available forces upon Donelson. General Johnston, however, asserting that Fort Donelson was not tenable, would only support the position by directing the force at Clarksville to cross to the south side of the Tennessee River, and ordered immediate preparations to be made for the removal of the army at Bowling Green, to Nashville, in rear of the Cumberland River. See p. 487, Life of General A. S. Johnston, by W. P. Johnston. New York: D. Appleton & Co. He also prescribed that, from Nashville, should any further retrograde movement become necessary, it should be made to Stevenson and thence according to circumstances. He further declared that as the possession of the Tennessee River by the enemy, resulting from the fall of Fort Henry, separated the army at Bowling Green from the one at Columbus, henceforth the forces thus sundered must act independently of each other until they can again be brought together.? Fort Henry fell o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The removal of McClellan. (search)
t had learned to look on war without a tremor. In the simple, touching words of the gallant and accomplished Walker: Every heart was filled with love and grief; every voice was raised in shouts expressive of devotion and indignation; and when the chief had passed out of sight, the romance of war was over for the Army of the Potomac. History of the Second army Corps, by General Francis A. Walker, p. 137. From McClellan's last service to the Republic, by George Ticknor Curtis (N. Y.: D. Appleton & Co.), pp. 81-83, we take the following description of McClellan's farewell to the Army of the Potomac: After he had reached Warrenton, a day was spent in viewing the position of the troops and in conferences with General Burnside respecting future operations. In the course of that day the order was published, and General McClellan issued a farewell address to the army. On the evening of Sunday, the 9th, there was an assembly of officers who came to take leave of him. On the 10th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The assault on Chickasaw bluffs. (search)
, commenced the embarkation of a column upon three grand flotillas, each bearing a division, to be joined by a fourth (Steele's) at Helena. In his Memoirs, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman. By himself. Vol. I., p. 285. (New York: D. Appleton & Co.) General Sherman says: The preparations at Memphis were necessarily hasty in the extreme, but it was the essence of the whole plan, viz., to reach Vicksburg, as it were, by surprise, while General Grant held in check Pemberton's armyed at all, though the losses in the brigades of Blair and De Courcy were heavy, and he would renew the assault in half an hour; but the assault was not again attempted. But in his Memoirs General Sherman says: Memoirs of W. T. Sherman (D. Appleton & Co.), Vol. I., p. 292. At first I intended to renew the assault, but soon became satisfied that the enemy's attention having been drawn to the only two practicable points, it would prove too costly, and accordingly resolved to look else
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
, 1863, the waters of the Mississippi having receded sufficiently to make it possible to march an army across the peninsula opposite Campaign against Vicksburgh. April--July 1863: from General Badeau's Military history of Ulysses S. Grant: D. Appleton & Co., N. Y. Vicksburg, I determined to adopt this course, and moved my advance to a point below the town. It was necessary, however, to have transports below, both for the purpose of ferrying troops over the river and to carry supplies. The the 18th all three bridges were complete and the troops were crossing. Sherman reached Bridgeport about noon of the 17th, and found Blair with Map of the siege of Vicksburgh. From General Badeau's Military history of Ulysses S. Grant. D. Appleton & Co., N. Y. the pontoon train already there. A few of the enemy were intrenched on the west bank, but they made little resistance, and soon surrendered. Two divisions were crossed that night, and the third the following morning. On the
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