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ssion the Doge yearly wedded Venice to the Adriatic. Against these crumbling hulks the batteries which silenced Sumter point their guns in vain. They have taken counsel of the Romans, who declared that he is the most dangerous enemy who values not his own life, and has insured success by resolving on suicide. Sixteen vessels will be sunk on the bar at the river entrance. Here is the list: AmazonCapt. SwiftNew Bedford. AmericaCapt. ChaseNew Bedford. AmericanCapt. BeardNew Bedford. ArcherCapt. WorthNew Bedford. CourierCapt. BraytonNew Bedford. FortuneCapt. RiceNew London. HeraldCapt. GiffordNew Bedford. KensingtonCapt. TiltonNew Bedford. LeonidasCapt. HowlandNew Bedford. Maria TheresaCapt. BaileyNew Bedford. PotomacCapt. BrownNew Bedford. Rebecca SimmsCapt. WillisNew Bedford. L. C. RichmondCapt. MaloyNew Bedford. Robin HoodCapt. SkinnerNew London. TenedosCapt. SissonNew London. William LeeCapt. LakeNew Bedford. They range from two hundred and seventy-five to
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
he Forty-Seventh Regiment of Virginia Volunteers numbering about three hundred men; one company of Woods' Twenty-Third South Carolina with some fifty men; Sturdivant's Battery and Taliaferro's Cavalry, with which he kept our forces at bay and punished them severely until they reached the Jerusalem plank road. General Kautz reports again that he captured all there were of Taliaferro's cavalry outside of the intrenchments. Wise further adds that he had the following additional forces: Major Archer's corps of reserves, second-class militia, and one howitzer under the command of Brigadier-General Colston, which forces he puts at less than one hundred and fifty; one company of convalescents of say a hundred men more, with say one hundred men for the two batteries of artillery, Graham's and Young's, and say one hundred and twenty men more for a company of convalescents, and a company of penitents. Penitents are soldiers who have been tried by court-martial and committed to prison fo
release English pilots, 849. M Maccormick, Dr., Chas., medical director at New Orleans, 403; discovers two cases of fever, 408-410; invaluable services, 895. MacKENZIEenzie, reference to, 862. Magee's Cavalry, 461. Magruder, General, 282. Mahan, John, services as spy, 484-485. Mahan, Professor, reference to, 817. Mahone, Gen., William, position at close of the war, 879; merit for leadership recognized by Lee, 879-880; an open letter from Horace Lacy to, 881-887. Major Archer's corps of reserves, reference 679. Malden, Mass., the arson case in, 1029-1030. Mallory, Colonel, slaves of, come to Butler, 256-257. Malvern, the flag-ship at Fort Fisher, 791, 796, 797. Manassas Junction, Butler advises fortifying, 222-223. Manchac pass, capture of, 501. Mansfield, General, commanding at Washington, mention of, 225, 236. Marcy, General, forwards copy of missing despatches to Grant, 874. Marengo, Napoleon's famous battle, 864-865. Marston, Gen
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
able officers: Colonels Putnam, Ninety-third Illinois; O'Meara, Ninetieth Illinois; and Torrence, Thirtieth Iowa; Lieutenant-Colonel Taft, of the Eleventh Corps; and Major Bushnell, Thirteenth Illinois. Among the wounded are Brigadier-Generals Giles A. Smith, Corse, and Matthias; Colonel Raum; Colonel Waugelin, Twelfth Missouri; Lieutenant-Colonel Partridge, Thirteenth Illinois; Major P. I. Welsh, Fifty-sixth Illinois; and Major Nathan McAlla, Tenth Iowa. Among the missing is Lieutenant-Colonel Archer, Seventeenth Iowa. My report is already so long, that I must forbear mentioning acts of individual merit. These will be recorded in the reports of division commanders, which I will cheerfully indorse; but I must say that it is but justice that colonels of regiments, who have so long and so well commanded brigades, as in the following cases, should be commissioned to the grade which they have filled with so much usefulness and credit to the public service, viz.: Colonel J. R. Co
l and distinguished military service. I desire also especially to mention Brig.-Gen. Elliott, Surgeon McParlin, Col. Beckwith, Lieut.-Col. T. C. H. Smith, Capt. Piper, Chief of Artillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom met my hearty approval and merits high commendation: Cols. Macomb, Clary, Marshall, Butler, Morgan, and Welch; Majors Selfridge and Meline; Captains Archer, Douglas Pope, Haight, Atcheson, De Kay, Piatt, Paine, Strother. Mr. McCain, confidential telegraph operator at my headquarters, accompanied me throughout the campaign, and was at all times eminently useful and efficient. My personal escort, consisting of two small companies of the First Ohio cavalry, numbering about one hundred men, performed more arduous service probably than any troops in the campaign. As orderlies, messengers, and guards they passed many sleepless nights and wear
l and distinguished military service. I desire also especially to mention Brig.-Gen. Elliott, Surgeon McParlin, Col. Beckwith, Lieut.-Col. T. C. H. Smith, Capt. Piper, Chief of Artillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom met my hearty approval and merits high commendation: Cols. Macomb, Clary, Marshall, Butler, Morgan, and Welch; Majors Selfridge and Meline; Captains Archer, Douglas Pope, Haight, Atcheson, De Kay, Piatt, Paine, Strother. Mr. McCain, confidential telegraph operator at my headquarters, accompanied me throughout the campaign, and was at all times eminently useful and efficient. My personal escort, consisting of two small companies of the First Ohio cavalry, numbering about one hundred men, performed more arduous service probably than any troops in the campaign. As orderlies, messengers, and guards they passed many sleepless nights and wear
ara of the Ninetieth Illinois, Torrence of the Thirtieth Iowa, Lieutenant-Colonel Taft of the Eleventh corps, and Major Bushnell of the Thirteenth Illinois volunteers. Among the wounded are Generals Giles A. Smith, J. M. Corse, and Matthews; Colonel Baum; Colonel Wangeline, Twelfth Missouri volunteers; Lieutenant-Colonel Patridge, Thirteenth Illinois volunteers; Major P. J. Welch, Fifty-sixth Illinois volunteers; and Major M. Allen, Tenth Iowa volunteers. Among the missing is Lieutenant-Colonel Archer, Seventeenth Iowa. My report is already so long, that I must for-bear mentioning acts of individual merit. These will be recorded in the reports of division commanders, which I will cheerfully indorse, but I must say that it is but justice that colonels of regiments who have so long and so well commanded brigades as in the following cases should be commissioned to the grade which they have filled with so much usefulness and credit to the public service, namely: Colonels J. R
sJacob AmmiBoston40 65 BrigLascarSprague & James'sSprague & JamesJoseph LeeBoston207 66 SloopOrionGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerE. CaryBoston100 671818ShipJavaT. Magoun'sT. MagounBenjamin RichBoston295.13 68 BrigArabT. Magoun'sT. MagounJ. Blake & T. MagounBoston & Medford225.62 69 ShipMercuryT. Magoun'sT. MagounNorwood & NicholsBoston304.66 70 BrigJonesT. Magoun'sT. MagounGeo. G. Jones & T. MagounBoston & Medford271.86 71 BrigGeorgeGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerJohn PrattBoston260 72 BrigArcherSprague & James'sSprague & JamesJoseph LeeBoston261 73 BrigPalmerSprague & James'sSprague & JamesJoseph LeeBoston277 741819BrigHalcyonT. Magoun'sT. MagounL. Cunningham & Co.Boston253.07 75 BrigSicilyT. Magoun'sT. MagounJoshua BlakeBoston163.46 76 SloopTruthSprague & James'sSprague & JamesJ. LambartTruro36 771820BrigTamahourelaune These brigs were put together; then taken to pieces and sent to the Sandwich Islands, on board the Thaddeus, commanded by Capt. A. Blanchard, of Medford.T
artillery posted on both roads. The Iron Brigade under General Meredith was ordered to hold the ground at all hazards. As they charged, the troops shouted: If we can't hold it, where will you find the men who can? On they swept, capturing General Archer and many of his Confederate brigade that had entered the woods from the other side. As Archer passed to the rear, Doubleday, who had been his classmate at West Point, greeted him with Good morning! I'm glad to see you! were gradually preArcher passed to the rear, Doubleday, who had been his classmate at West Point, greeted him with Good morning! I'm glad to see you! were gradually pressing toward the east, while the Federals were marching along a line eastward of that followed by the Confederates. The new commander of the Army of the Potomac was keeping his forces interposed between the legions of Lee and the Federal capital, and watching for an opportunity to force the Confederates to battle where the Federals would have the advantage of position. It was plain that they must soon come together in a gigantic contest; but just where the shock of battle would take place was
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
adventurous career till she ran into the harbor of Bahia, Oct. 5, 1864, where she encountered a vessel of Wilke's flying squadron, the Wachusett. Commander Napoleon Collins, in violation of the neutrality laws, suddenly attacked the Florida and received her surrender. The Clarence was burned. Within two weeks the Tacony had ten prizes, and the coast between Chesapeake and Casco bays was in a state of terror. The dauntless schooner shared the fate of the Clarence when the better-suited Archer fell into her clutches. But the latter's career was short. Dashing into the harbor of Portland, Maine, Read cut out the revenue cutter Caleb Cushing. The next day he was attacked, captured, and sent as a prisoner to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. The Florida had no less than fourteen prizes to her credit, when, late in August, 1863, she entered the harbor of Brest, France, greatly in need of repairs. Here she remained until February, 1864, and became in the mean time almost a new ship
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