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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 30 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Archer or search for Archer in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's final and full report of the Pennsylvania campaign and battle of Gettysburg. (search)
lions of artillery, to ascertain the strength of the enemy, whose force was supposed to consist chiefly of cavalry. The leading division, under General Heth, found the enemy's videttes about three miles west of Gettysburg, and continued to advance until within a mile of the town, when two brigades were sent forward to reconnoitre. They drove in the advance of the enemy very gallantly, but subsequently encountered largely superior numbers, and were compelled to retire with loss, Brigadier-General Archer, commanding one of the brigades, being taken prisoner. General Heth then prepared for action, and as soon as Pender arrived to support him, was ordered by General Hill to advance. The artillery was placed in position, and the engagement opened with vigor. General Heth pressed the enemy steadily back, breaking his first and second lines, and attacking his third with great resolution. About 2 1/2 P. M. the advance of Ewell's corps, consisting of Rodes' division, with Carter's ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General A. P. Hill's report of battle of Gettysburg. (search)
f the artillery, being with Anderson. About three miles from Gettysburg, his advance brigade, Archer's, encountered the advance of the enemy. Archer and Davis were thrown into line, and, with someArcher and Davis were thrown into line, and, with some pieces of artillery from Pegram, the enemy were steadily driven back to the wooded hills this side of Gettysburg, where their principal force (since ascertained to be the 1st and 11th Corps) was dispfurther advance. Heth's whole division was now thrown into line: Davis on the left of the road; Archer, Pettigrew and Brokenbrough on the right, and Pender formed in his rear; Thomas on the left, andnnihilation of the First Corps of the enemy. Major-General Heth was slightly wounded. Brigadier-General Archer was taken prisoner by the enemy. Brigadier-General Scales was also wounded. Pettigrewtempt to pursue. Major-General Trimble, Brigadier-General Pettigrew and Colonel Fry (commanding Archer's brigade) were wounded while most gallantly leading their troops. The troops resumed their for