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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 30 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. You can also browse the collection for Archer or search for Archer in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 7 (search)
eries posted in advance of the railroad had to be hastily withdrawn. The division of Hill which held Jackson's advanced line was thus disposed: the brigades of Archer, Lane, and Pender from right to left, with Gregg's in rear of the interval between Archer and Lane, and Thomas's in rear of that between Lane and Pender. Meade pArcher and Lane, and Thomas's in rear of that between Lane and Pender. Meade pushed forward his line impetuously, drove back Lane through the woods, and then, wedging in between Lane and the brigade on his right (Archer's) swept back the right flank of the one and the left flank of the other, capturing above two hundred prisoners and several standards, crossed the railroad, pushed up the crest, and reached Archer's) swept back the right flank of the one and the left flank of the other, capturing above two hundred prisoners and several standards, crossed the railroad, pushed up the crest, and reached Gregg's position on a new military road which Lee had made for the purpose of establishing direct connection between his two wings, and behind which Jackson's second line was posted. The importance of this road has been greatly exaggerated by General Burnside: it was made merely for convenience of transportation, and was in no
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 9 (search)
idge, leaving the battery unsupported. Meanwhile, the skirmishers of Cutler's other two regiments (the Fourteenth Brooklyn, under Colonel Fowler, and the Ninety-fifth New York, under Colonel Biddle) were disputing with the Confederate brigade of Archer the passage of Willoughby Run, and skirmishing in a skirt of woods along the brook with such as had crossed. At this moment, the Iron Brigade opportunely swept down from the left, struck the flank of the Confederate brigade, and captured several hundred that had already crossed, including the commander, Brigadier-General Archer. This movement was led by the Second Wisconsin, under Colonel Fair child, supported by the remainder of the Iron Brigade. The dispositions at this point were made by General Reynolds in person; and it was at the moment when, after urging on his men with animating words, he saw this successful charge under way, and turned to leave the woods, that he was struck with a rifle-shot that caused almost instant death