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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Fannie A. Beers, Memories: a record of personal exeperience and adventure during four years of war. 2 2 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Appendix C: Report of surgeon Lafayette Guild, Confederate State Army, medical Director, of the killed and wounded at Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 1862. (search)
32629290 37th North CarolinaBranch'sA. P. Hill's21315150 18th North Carolina Branch'sA. P. Hill's11314140 1st TennesseeArcher'sA. P. Hill's42024240 7th TennesseeArcher'sA. P. Hill's43034340 14th TennesseeArcher'sA. P. Hill's33134340 6th AlabamaArcher'sA. P. Hill's43034340 14th TennesseeArcher'sA. P. Hill's33134340 6th Alabama BattalionArcher'sA. P. Hill's18990 19th GeorgiaThomas's A. P. Hill's42731310 45th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's74148480 49th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's94150500 14th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's42428280 66th VirginiaFields's A. P. Hill's2220 40thArcher'sA. P. Hill's33134340 6th Alabama BattalionArcher'sA. P. Hill's18990 19th GeorgiaThomas's A. P. Hill's42731310 45th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's74148480 49th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's94150500 14th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's42428280 66th VirginiaFields's A. P. Hill's2220 40th VirginiaFields's A. P. Hill's4440 2d Virginia BattalionFields's A. P. Hill's7770 Purcells BatteryFields's A. P. Hill's21214140 Total22910471276 229104712761276 Official copy. (Signed) Charles Marshall, Major and A. D. C. Archer'sA. P. Hill's18990 19th GeorgiaThomas's A. P. Hill's42731310 45th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's74148480 49th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's94150500 14th GeorgiaThomas'sA. P. Hill's42428280 66th VirginiaFields's A. P. Hill's2220 40th VirginiaFields's A. P. Hill's4440 2d Virginia BattalionFields's A. P. Hill's7770 Purcells BatteryFields's A. P. Hill's21214140 Total22910471276 229104712761276 Official copy. (Signed) Charles Marshall, Major and A. D. C.
's left flank, and enter Harper's Ferry. Gen. A. P. Hill observing a hill on the enemy's extreme left occupied by infantry without artillery, and protected only by abattis of felled timber, directed Gen. Pender with his own brigade, and those of Archer and Col. Brockenbrough, to seize the crest, which was done with slight resistance. At the same time he ordered Gens. Branch and Gregg to march along the Shenandoah, and taking advantage of the ravines intersecting its steep banks, to establish t. Jones. Hill's batteries were thrown forward, and united their fire with those of Gen. Jones. The progress of the enemy was immediately arrested, and his line began to waver. At this moment Gen. Jones ordered Toombs to charge the flank, while Archer, supported by Branch and Gregg, moved upon the front of the Federal line. The enemy made a brief resistance, then broke, and retreated in confusion towards the Antietam, pursued by the troops of Hill and Jones, until he reached the protection of
and the division batteries of Anderson, Ransom, and McLaws. A. P. Hill, of Jackson's corps, was posted between Longstreet's extreme right and Hamilton's Crossing, on the railroad. His front line, consisting of the brigades of Pender, Lane, and Archer, occupied the edge of a wood. Lieut.-Col. Walker, with fourteen pieces of artillery, was posted near the right, supported by two Virginia regiments. Early and Taliaferro's divisions composed Jackson's second line-D. H. Hill's division his reser, by whose fire they were momentarily checked, but soon recovering, they pressed forward, until coming within range of our infantry, the contest became fierce and bloody. Here at one time the enemy broke the Confederate line, turning the left of Archer and the right of Lane. But reinforcements from Jackson's second line were rapidly brought forward, and restored the battle. After a severe contest, the enemy was routed, driven from the woods; and although largely reinforced, he was driven back
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 7 (search)
eries posted in advance of the railroad had to be hastily withdrawn. The division of Hill which held Jackson's advanced line was thus disposed: the brigades of Archer, Lane, and Pender from right to left, with Gregg's in rear of the interval between Archer and Lane, and Thomas's in rear of that between Lane and Pender. Meade pArcher and Lane, and Thomas's in rear of that between Lane and Pender. Meade pushed forward his line impetuously, drove back Lane through the woods, and then, wedging in between Lane and the brigade on his right (Archer's) swept back the right flank of the one and the left flank of the other, capturing above two hundred prisoners and several standards, crossed the railroad, pushed up the crest, and reached Archer's) swept back the right flank of the one and the left flank of the other, capturing above two hundred prisoners and several standards, crossed the railroad, pushed up the crest, and reached Gregg's position on a new military road which Lee had made for the purpose of establishing direct connection between his two wings, and behind which Jackson's second line was posted. The importance of this road has been greatly exaggerated by General Burnside: it was made merely for convenience of transportation, and was in no
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 9 (search)
idge, leaving the battery unsupported. Meanwhile, the skirmishers of Cutler's other two regiments (the Fourteenth Brooklyn, under Colonel Fowler, and the Ninety-fifth New York, under Colonel Biddle) were disputing with the Confederate brigade of Archer the passage of Willoughby Run, and skirmishing in a skirt of woods along the brook with such as had crossed. At this moment, the Iron Brigade opportunely swept down from the left, struck the flank of the Confederate brigade, and captured several hundred that had already crossed, including the commander, Brigadier-General Archer. This movement was led by the Second Wisconsin, under Colonel Fair child, supported by the remainder of the Iron Brigade. The dispositions at this point were made by General Reynolds in person; and it was at the moment when, after urging on his men with animating words, he saw this successful charge under way, and turned to leave the woods, that he was struck with a rifle-shot that caused almost instant death
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
s over came home to a little supper, or went to one elsewhere, so that, from twelve at noon till midnight, we were constantly in society as agreeable and exciting as any in the country. Our next neighbors were the Edward Livingstons, between whose parlor and ours we soon removed all obstructions; and under the same roof, Colonel Hayne Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina, born 1791; best known for his debate with Mr. Webster in the United States Senate, in 1830. and his wife, Mr. Cheves, Mr. Archer, Colonel Hamilton, General Mercer, Mr. King, Rufus King, our Minister to Great Britain in 1796; died in 1827 at the age of seventy-two. and so on. Two or three times a week, therefore, we could make an agreeable supper-party without going out of the house. . . . . The only objection to society at Washington is, that there is too much of it. Here, however, things are entirely different. It is, at this moment, a city of mourning. . . . . The first moment after our arrival we heard of
ppointed Captain, Police Division No 1, May 26, 1854 Appointed Deputy Chief of Police, Feb. 11, 1861 Chosen Chief of Police, Apr. 4, 1870 Appointed Probation Officer for Suffolk Co., Oct. 21, 1878 Savannah sufferers Great relief meeting at Faneuil Hall, Jan. 9, 1865 Scales large, first in use at the Market, 1782 Scandals An unwritten sensation in high life, caused by a kiss, Oct., 1788 Carpenter and apprentice girl, at South Boston, Sep., 1821 A constable and Archer's ring, Aug., 1836 Rev. Joy H. Fairchild's, began, June, 1844 Dalton and Coburn, began, Oct., 1855 Hancock School, began, Nov., 1856 Rev. Isaac H. Kalloch's, began, Jan., 1857 Officer Prescott sensation, Aug., 1858 Rev. Henry Ward Beecher sensation, June, 1875 Scavengers Had six carts in service, 1800 Carts ordered to have tail-boards, 1809 Employ 150 horses, 1880 Schools established by law, Oct., 1647 For writing, established, 1696 Provided for colo
was so different when among the sick, so gentle, so benignant beside the bedsides of suffering men, that I soon learned to know and appreciate the royal heart which at other times he managed to conceal under a rough and forbidding exterior. Dr. Archer, of Maryland, was as complete a contrast as could be imagined. A poet of no mean order, indulging in all the idiosyncrasies of a poet, he was yet a man of great nerve and an excellent surgeon. Always dressed with careful negligence, his handsOrleans. At the depot we met again, and the gentleman very kindly took charge of me. I was going to Newnan, he returning to camp. Delightful conversation beguiled the way. Among other subjects, poets and poetry were discussed. I told him of Dr. Archer, and a beautiful Ode to Hygeia composed by him, parts of which I remembered and repeated. Gradually I discovered that Mr. Augustin had an unfinished manuscript of his own with him, entitled Doubt, and at last persuaded him to let me read it. F
to break the Southern advance; Gordon was, however, only to waste blood, for he came too late. Archer was now up to the front line, and Pender's North Carolina brigade struck Gordon's flank. Just a Branch's brigade joined in the chase of Taylor's men, who had been scattered by the brigades of Archer, Field and Pender. General Taylor was mortally wounded, and his command driven across Bull Run.ackson's trains that had been threatened by a cavalry attack. Pender was kept on the left until Archer and Thomas were severely pressed. Then his brigade and Brockenbrough's were put in, and all tog, and the Federal army had been slowly driven off the entire field. In the advance of Jackson, Archer's, Thomas' and Pender's brigades acting in concert had rendered most effective service. Latham'on his flank. General Hill, whose brigades were mainly engaged, says: Gregg, Pender, Thomas and Archer were successively thrown in. The enemy obstinately contested the ground, and it was not until th
nchester & Harper's Ferry railroad. On nearing the town, General Pender, in command of his own, Archer's and Brockenbrough's brigades, was sent to seize a crest overlooking the town, which was done w come against him by bridge No. 4, Pender's and Brockenbrough's, and threw Branch's, Gregg's and Archer's against the forefront of the battle, while Toombs', Kemper's and Garnett's engaged against its Appomattox, pp. 261, 262. Gen. A. P. Hill reports of his brigades: With a yell of defiance, Archer charged them, retook McIntosh's guns, and drove them back pellmell. Branch and Gregg with theiranced with the brigades of Pender, Gregg and Thomas, in his front line, Lane (Branch's brigade), Archer and Brockenbrough in his second. The advance of these brigades was made in the face of a tremenrushed away. Pender met a sharp infantry fire. His Carolinians were not retarded, however, and Archer's brigade and Lane, with his North Carolinians, supporting them, the small force in front was so
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