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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for George Armistead or search for George Armistead in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armistead, George, 1780- (search)
Armistead, George, 1780- Military officer; born in New Market, Caroline co., Va., April 10, 1780; entered the army as second lieutenant in 1799. In 1813 he held the rank of major in the 3d Artillery, and was distinguished at the capture of Fort George. His gallant defence of Fort McHenry in September, 1814, won for him immooned like a bombshell, with goblets and salver. After his death at Baltimore, April 25, 1818, a fine marble monument was erected there to his memory. The George Armistead. grateful citizens also erected a large monument, designed by Maximilian Godefroy, and wrought in white marble, in memory of all the defenders of Baltimore. ateful citizens also erected a large monument, designed by Maximilian Godefroy, and wrought in white marble, in memory of all the defenders of Baltimore. It The Armistead vase. is a cenotaph, and was erected in 1815, at a cost of $60,000. It bears the names, in bronze letters, of the officers who perished in defence of the city.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
ith considerable loss of prisoners, from the strong position on our extreme left, from which he was annoying our forces on Little Round Top. In the terrific assault on our centre Generals Hancock and Gibbon were wounded. In the rebel army, Generals Armistead, Kemper, Petigru, and Trimble were wounded, the first named mortally, the latter also made prisoner; General Garnett was killed, and 3,500 officers and men made prisoners. These were the expiring agonies of the three days conflict, and way, Gibbon, Graham, Hancock, Sickles, and Warren; while of officers below the rank of general, and men, there were 2,834 killed, 13,709 wounded, and 6,643 missing. On the Confederate side there were killed on the field, or mortally wounded, Generals Armistead, Barksdale, Garnett, Pender, Petigru, and Semmes, and wounded, Heth, Hood, Johnson, Kemper, Kimball, and Trimble. Of officers below the rank of general, and men, there were taken prisoners, including the wounded, 13,621, a number ascertain
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McHenry, Fort (search)
as garrisoned by about 1,000 men, volunteers and regulars, commanded by Maj. George Armistead (q. v.). To the right of it, guarding the shores of the Patapsco, and t a distance of 2 miles, and kept up a well-directed bombardment until 3 P. M. Armistead immediately opened the batteries of Fort McHenry upon the assailants; but aftve up nearer the fort, in order to increase the effectiveness of their guns. Armistead was delighted, and immediately ordered a general cannonade and bombardment frh were compelled to send a division of small boats to tow her out of reach of Armistead's guns. The garrison gave three cheers, and the firing ceased. After the he fleet, and was inspired by the event to compose The Star-Spangled banner. Armistead and his brave band received the grateful bene- Sallyport of Fort McHenry. e of Baltimore and of the whole country. The citizens of Baltimore presented Armistead with a costly service of silver, the principal piece —a vase—in the form of a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Point, battle of (search)
morning he landed 9,000 troops at North Point, 12 miles above Baltimore, and at the same time the British fleet bombarded Fort McHenry (q. v.), which guarded the harbor of Baltimore, a city of 40,000 inhabitants at that time, and a place against which the British held a grudge, because of the numerous privateers. The citizens of Baltimore had wisely provided for the emergency. A large number of troops were gathered around the city. Fort McHenry was garrisoned by 1,000 men, under Maj. George Armistead (q. v.), and supported by batteries. The citizens had constructed a long line of fortifications on what afterwards became Patterson Park. Intelligence of the landing of the British at North Point produced great alarm in Baltimore. A large number of families, with such property as they could carry with them, fled to the country, and inns, for 100 miles north of the city, were filled with refugees. The veteran Gen. Samuel Smith was in chief command of the military at Baltimore, t