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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 10 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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turday last. on a cruise, having ran the paper blockade of the Lincoln Abolition war steamers, off the mouth of the Mississippi. She has a picked crew, and her commander is known to be a most brave and chivalrous sailor, and he has under him a most gallant set of officers: Commander, Raphael Semmes; Lieutenants, John M. Kells, R. F. Chapman, W. E. Evans, J. M. Stribling; Paymaster, Henry Myers; Passed Assistant-Surgeon, Francis L. Gait; Lieutenant of Marines, Becket E. Howell; Midshipmen, Richard F. Armstrong, W. A. Hicks, A. G. Hudgins, J. D. Wilson; Gunner, Thomas C. Cuddy; Sail-maker, M. P. Beaufort; Engineers, First Assistant, acting as chief, Miles J. Freeman; Second Assistant, W. P. Brooks; Third Assistants, Matthew O'Brien and Simeon W. Cummings. She has a crew of sixty-five men and twenty marines. The Charleston Mercury published the following on the Confederate Commissioners in Europe: It is now several months since our commissioners were sent to Europe. Thus far it s
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
tates of America, Navy Department, Montgomery, April 18, 1861. Sir — You are hereby detached from duty as Chief of the Light-house Bureau, and will proceed to New Orleans and take command of the steamer Sumter--named in honor of our recent victory over Fort Sumter. The following officers have been ordered to report to you for duty: Lieutenants John M. Kell, R. T. Chapman, J. M. Stribling and William T. Evans; Paymaster Henry Myers: Surgeon Francis L. Galt; Midshipmen Wm. A. Hicks, Richard F. Armstrong, Albert G. Hudgins, John F. Holden and Joseph D. Wilson. I am respectfully, your obedient servant, S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy. On the 22d of April, Semmes took command of his vessel in New Orleans. The Sumter was simply a coasting steamer, cumbered with upper cabins, and with apparently none of the attributes of a ship-of-war. Who would imagine that so much harm lurked in that frail vessel? though her graceful lines and jaunty air pleased her commander, who seemed
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
l J. Gallardo, Second-class Boy, and John M. Sonius, First-class Boy. The above are of foreign birth. It thus appears that out of one hundred and sixty-three officers and crew of the Kearsarge, only eleven persons were foreign-born. List of officers of Confederate steamer Alabama, June 25, 1864. Raphael Semmes, Captain; J. M. Kell and Arthur Sinclair, Lieutenants; R. K. Howell, Lieutenant-of-Marines; J. S. Bulloch, Sailing Master; E. A. Maffitt and E. M. Anderson, Midshipmen; R. F. Armstrong and Jos. D. Wilson, Lieutenants; M. J. Freeman, Chief Engineer; John W. Pundt and M. O'Brien, Third-Assistant Engineers; J. O. Cuddy, W. Crawford and C. Seymour, Gunners; Captain's-Clerk, W. B. Smith; Boatswain, B. L. McClaskey; Francis L. Gait, Surgeon; W. P. Brooks, Second-Assistant Engineer ; Henry Alcott, Sailmaker D. H. Llewellyn, Assistant-Surgeon; G. T. Fullam, James Evans, Max Mulliner and J. Schroeder, Master's-Mates; Win. Robinson, Carpenter. There has been doubt expressed
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Preface (search)
he was still afloat as the training-ship of the New Jersey state militia. She has every sail up except her head-sails and studding sails. As can be seen at a glance, she was a very lofty craft, and though clewed up, she has her sky-sails, her royals, her topgallant-sails, her topsails, set on every mast. Excellent, whether sailing, steering, working, scudding, lying to, or riding at anchor in a seaway, she sometimes got her sternboard in stays. With this single exception, reported Commander Armstrong, she possesses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Pa
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
eleven ordinary seamen and firemen, all were native-born citizens of the United States. Captain Winslow's ship and his crew were trained to the hour, and her engines and engine-room force were in excellent condition, an Officers of the Alabama in 1862 From left to right: First Lieut. John M. Kell; Surgeon David H. Llewellyn; Capt. Raphael Semmes; Third Lieut. Joseph D. Wilson; Lieut. P. Schroeder; Master J. P. Bullock; Lieut. Arthur Sinclair; Chief Engineer Miles D. Freeman; Lieut. Richard F. Armstrong; Captain's Clerk W. B. Smith; Surgeon Francis L. Galt; Asst. Engineer William P. Brooke; Midshipman Eugene Maffitt; Midshipman E. M. Anderson; Master's Mate George T. Fullman; Lieut. of Marines Becker K. Howell; Carpenter William Robinson; Paymaster Clarence R. Yonge; Fifth Lieut. John Lowe; Asst. Engineer S. W. Cummings. The portraits here grouped were taken in London in 1862 before the departure on August 13th in the steamer Bahama to join Ship no. 290, built at the Lairds' shi
s of America, Navy Department, Montgomery, April 18, 1861. Sir:—You are hereby detached from duty as Chief of the Light-House Bureau, and will proceed to New Orleans, and take command of the steamer Sumter (named in honor of our recent victory over Fort Sumter). The following officers have been ordered to report to you, for duty: Lieutenants John M. Kell, R. T. Chapman, John M. Stribling, and Wm. E. Evans; Paymaster Henry. Myers; Surgeon Francis L. Galt; Midshipmen, Wm. A. Hicks, Richard F. Armstrong, Albert G. Hudgins, John F. Holden, and Jos. D. Wilson. I am respectfully your obedient servant, S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy. Commander Raphael Semmes. The reader will observe that I am addressed as a commander, the rank which I held in the old service. The Navy Department, in consultation with the President, had adopted the rule of accepting all the officers who chose to come to us from the old Navy—as the Federal Navy began now to be called —without increase of rank;<
umter. Her crew, as reported by this roll, consisted of ninety-two persons, exclusive of officers. Twenty of these ninety-two persons were marines—a larger guard than was usual for so small a ship. The officers were as follows: Commander.—Raphael Semmes. Lieutenants.—John M. Kell; Robert T. Chapman; John M. Stribling; William E. Evans. Paymaster.—Henry Myers. Surgeon.—Francis L. Galt. 1st Lieutenant of Marines.—B. Howell. Midshipmen.—William A. Hicks; Albert G. Hudgins; Richard F. Armstrong; Joseph D. Wilson. Engineers.—Miles J. Freeman; William P. Brooks; Matthew O'Brien; Simeon W. Cummings. Boatswain.—Benjamin P. Mecasky. Gunner.—Thomas C. Cuddy. Sailmaker.—W. P. Beaufort. Carpenter.—William Robinson. Captain's Clerk.—W. Breedlove Smith. Commissions had been forwarded to all the officers entitled to receive them, and acting appointments had been given by me to the warrant officers. It will thus be seen, how formally all these de
t, and several other of my officers, I embarked on board the mail-steamer for Southampton. The following is an extract from the last letter that was written to the Secretary of the Navy from on board the Sumter:— I now have the honor to report to you, that I have discharged and paid off, in full, all the crew, numbering fifty, with the exception of the ten men detailed to remain by the ship, as servants, and to form a boat's crew for the officer left in charge. I have placed Midshipman R. F. Armstrong, assisted by Acting Master's Mate I. T. Hester, in charge of the ship, with provisions and funds for ten or twelve months, and I have directed all the other officers to return to the Confederate States, and report themselves to the Department. I will myself proceed to London, and after conferring with Mr. Mason, make the best of my way home. I trust the Department will see, in what I have done, an anxious desire to advance the best interests of our country, and that it will justi
took with me to the Alabama, as the reader has seen, my old and well-tried First Lieutenant, Kell. He became the first lieutenant of the new ship. Lieutenant Richard F. Armstrong, of Georgia, whom, as the reader will recollect, I had left at Gibraltar, in charge of the Sumter, took Chapman's place, and became second lieutenant. Armstrong was a young gentleman of intelligence and character, and had made good progress in his profession. He was a midshipman at the Naval School, at Annapolis, when the war broke out. Though still a mere boy, he resigned his appointment without hesitation, and came South. He had made the cruise with me in the Sumter, and been since promoted. Midshipman Joseph D. Wilson, of Florida, also an éleve of Annapolis, and who, like Armstrong, had made the cruise with me in the Sumter, and been promoted, took Stribling's place, and became third lieutenant. My fourth lieutenant in place of Evans was Mr. Arthur Sinclair, who, though not bred in the old ser
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
h, June 30, 1907. It was not strong, but it made a very good Record— partial list of Survivors—Names of the men who served Faithfully on the Briny deep Many people are living to-day who do not know that the Confederate Government had a navy, and yet there were men who served gallantly on the water and suffered as many hardships as did the brave men who fought on land. Below will be found a partial and perhaps a very inaccurate list of the survivors of the Confederate Navy. Richard F. Armstrong, Halifax, N. S.—Born in Georgia; midshipman, U. S. N.; lieutenant C. S. N.; served on cruiser Sumter, Alabama, Battery Buchanan and Fort Fisher. M. Bynes, private Marine Corps, Corinth, Miss.; served at Drewry's Bluff. Mortimer M. Benton, Louisville, Ky.—Born in Kentucky; midshipman U. S. N.; lieutenant C. S. N.; served Kentucky State Guard; steamer Gaines, Harriet Lane, Webb; commanded steamer Roanoke; served on the steamer Tallahassee at Drewry's Bluff; captured at battle of
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