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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
mall affair, in which the Confederates lost about three hundred men and the Union troops must have lost more than ten times as many. This was an assault made upon troops of the Fifteenth Corps by two brigades of Bate's Confederate division and Armstrong's brigade of Jackson's cavalry dismounted, supported by Smith's brigade of Bate's division and Ferguson's and Ross's brigades of Jackson's cavalry. Lewis's Kentucky brigade attacked the front of Osterhaus's division without success. Bullock's Florida brigade charged along the Marietta road and was driven back, with heavy loss, by the fire of the 53d Ohio regiment. Armstrong assailed the position held by Walcutt's brigade across the Villa Rica road and met a bloody repulse. General Bate officially reported the loss in his division as 450. General Walcutt in his official report says that 244 dead and wounded rebels were found in my front, and many were doubtless removed. The Confederate loss in this very small affair was, therefor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
ch, together with Maury's command, was held in reserve. Early the following morning the enemy were reported by [F. C.] Armstrong in large force at Fairburn, on the West Point road. It became at once evident that Sherman was moving with his main boour ability to defeat this movement. Reynolds's and Lewis's brigades were dispatched to Jonesboro' to cooperate with Armstrong. General Adams, at Opelika, was directed to guard the defenses of that place with renewed vigilance, while General Mauered to the rear, or to be placed on cars in readiness to move at any moment the railroad became seriously threatened. Armstrong was instructed to establish a line of couriers to my headquarters, in order to report every hour, if requisite, the movt favorable for defense; and, in addition, to hold his corps in readiness to march at the word of command. Jackson and Armstrong received orders to report the different positions of the corps of the enemy at dark every night. The morning of the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
ra P. Stearns. Third Brigade, Col. Elias Wright: 5th U. S., Col. Giles W. Shurtleff; 10th U. S., Lieut.-Col. Edward H. Powell; 37th U. S., Col. Nathan Goff, Jr.; 107th U. S., Lieut.-Col. David M. Sells. Second division, Brig.-Gen. William Birney. First Brigade, Col. Charles S. Russell: 7th U. S., Col. James Shaw, Jr.; 109th U. S., Col. Orion A. Bartholomew; 116th U. S., Col. William W. Woodward; 117th U. S., Col. Lewis G. Brown. Second Brigade, Col. Ulysses Doubleday: 8th U. S., Col. Samuel C. Armstrong; 45th U. S. (6 co's), Lieut.-Col. Edelmiro Mayer; 127th U. S., Lieut.-Col. James Given. Third Brigade, Col. Henry C. Ward: 28th U. S., Lieut.-Col. Thomas H. Logan; 29th U. S., Maj. T. Jeff. Brown; 31st U. S., Maj. Thomas Wright. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Edward A. Wild. First Brigade, Col. Alonzo G. Draper: 22d U. S., Lieut.-Col. Ira C. Terry; 36th U. S., Maj. William H. Hart; 38th U. S., Lieut.-Col. Dexter E. Clapp; 118th U. S., Col. John C. Moon. Second Brigade, Col. Edward M
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 12.91 (search)
t forty men, including Captain Semmes and thirteen officers. At 1 P. M. we started for Southampton. editors. When Mr. Lancaster approached Captain Semmes, and said, I think every man has been picked up; where shall I land you? Captain Semmes replied, I am now under the English colors, and the sooner you put me with my officers and men on English soil, the better. The little yacht moved rapidly The sinking of the Alabama. away at once, under a press of steam, for Southampton. Armstrong, our second lieutenant, and some of our men who were saved by the French pilot-boats, were taken into Cherbourg. Our loss was 9 killed, 21 wounded. and 10 drowned. It has been charged that an arrangement had been entered into between Mr. Lancaster and Captain Semmes, previous to our leaving Cherbourg, that in the event of the Alabama being sunk the Deerhound would come to our rescue. Captain Semmes and myself met Mr. Lancaster for the first time when rescued by him, and he related to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 12.92 (search)
delivering himself up.--editors. The wounded of the survivors were brought on board the Kearsarge for surgical attendance. Seventy men, including five officers (Surgeon F. L. Galt, acting paymaster, Second Lieutenant J. Seaman William Gouin, mortally wounded on the Kearsarge. D. Wilson, First Assistant-Engineer M. J. Freeman, Third Assistant-Engineer Pundt, and Boatswain McCloskey), were saved by the Kearsarge's boats and a French pilot-boat. Another pilot-boat saved Second Lieutenant Armstrong and some men, who were landed at Cherbourg. Lieutenant Wilson was the only officer who delivered up his sword. He refused to go on board the Deerhound, and because of his honorable conduct Captain Winslow on taking his parole gave him a letter of recommendation. Our crew fraternized with their prisoners, and shared their clothes, supper, and grog with them. The conduct of the Alabama's Assistant-Surgeon Llewellyn, son of a British rector, deserves mention. He was unremitting
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The defense of Fort Fisher. (search)
effect any particular damage, and so wild that at least one-third of the missiles fell in the river beyond the fort or in the bordering marshes; but now the fire was concentrated, and the definite object of the fleet was the destruction of the land defenses by enfilade and direct fire, and the ships took position accordingly. When attacked in December, I had had for my 44 heavy guns and three mortars not over 3600 shot and shell; and for the most effective gun in the work, the 150-pounder Armstrong, there were but 13 shells, and we had no other ammunition that could be used in it. The frigates Minnesota and Wabash each had an armament superior to ours, and these two vessels alone fired more shot and. shell at the works in the last attack than we had, all told or on hand, in both engagements. During the time between the two expeditions we had begged for more ammunition, but Interior view of the three traverses of the North-West salient, adjoining the River road. [see map, P. 645.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
ewick. Attached Brigade (detached from 3d Brigade, 2d Division), Col. Charles S. Russell: 10th U. S., Lieut.-Col. Edward H. Powell; 28th U. S., Lieut.-Col. Thomas H. Logan. Cavalry: 2d U. S. Colored, Lieut.-Col. George W. Cole. Second division, Brig.-Gen. William Birney. First Brigade, Col. James Shaw, Jr.: 7th U. S., Lieut.-Col. Oscar E. Pratt; 109th U. S., Col. Orion A. Bartholomew; 116th U. S., Lieut.-Col. George H. Laird. Second Brigade, Col. Ulysses Doubleday: 8th U. S., Col. Samuel C. Armstrong; 41st U. S., Col. Llewellyn F. Haskell; 45th U. S., Maj. Theodore C. Glazier; 127th U. S., Lieut.-Col. James Givin. Third Brigade, Col. William W. Woodward: 29th U. S., Col. Clark E. Royce; 31st U. S., Col. Henry C. Ward. artillery Brigade, Capt. Loomis L. Langdon: 1st Conn., Capt. James B. Clinton; 4th N. J. (or D, 1st N. J.), Capt. Charles R. Doane; 5th N. J. (or E, 1st N. J.), Capt. Zenas C. Warren; E, 1st Pa., Capt. Henry Y. Wildey; C, 3d R. I., Capt. Martin S. James; D, 1st