hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 225 results in 66 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIV: return to Cambridge (search)
ven months; besides other things too much for anybody. It was a rare thing for him to admit that he worked beyond his strength, but such was often the case. In the autumn of this year, Colonel Higginson wrote to his sister:— I invited Matthew Arnold to spend a few days with us, but he is not coming, being engaged to Phillips Brooks. And later:— This morning I spent in taking Matthew Arnold to schools in Boston . . . . He is very cordial and appreciative, not in the least cynical, oMatthew Arnold to schools in Boston . . . . He is very cordial and appreciative, not in the least cynical, or patronizing. In the poem called Sixty and Six, Colonel Higginson describes the joy he found in the blithe littie, lithe little daughter of mine. The following extracts, referring to his new and absorbing possession, are taken partly from his letters and partly from his diaries:— To-day the crocuses are up and I have been taking off part of their covering of leaves. . . . But what is all the promise of early spring beside the round rosy cheeks of our darling, her great earnest brown<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
She knows Burne-Jones well and says he is a very simple person. Dined with the Edwin Arnolds . . . . She was Fanny Channing, a tall, elegant, attractive woman and a most adoring wife of a loving husband. There is something un-English about Arnold, perhaps from his long life in the East and his poetic nature. He is delightful when not talking politics, but there he is so vehement as to be a little fatiguing though always in a gentle, graceful way. He is a small man with a pleasing face. . or vain in a petty way, but has a sublime self confidence and thinks he (B.) alone can save this nation of stupid snub-nosed Englishmen —and A. seems to think the same of Beaconsfield's policy. To save the British Empire from the Russians is to Arnold like saving Rome from the Gauls. Arnold the other day came upon that poem He who died at Azan, read it with delight and finally remembered that he wrote it himself in youth . . . . She (Fanny) showed me his Star of India with pride; but her chil
, 26. See also Mrs. H. W. Longfellow. April Days, 157, 408. Army Life in a Black Regiment, 227, 230, 237, 363, 411, 423; at work on, 282. Arnim, Bettina von, Higginson reads, 343-46. Arnold, Edward, Higginson visits, 331, 332. Arnold, Matthew, and Higginson, 301. Atlantic Essays, 156, 157, 411. Baby of the Regiment, The, 237, 412. Barney, Margaret Dellinger, granddaughter of T. W. H., 394, 395. Barney, Margaret Higginson, daughter of T. W. H. See Higginson, Margaret Wirth and death of first child, 294, 295; at Plymouth, N. H., 296; A Search for the Pleiades, 296; in legislature, 296-99; birth of second child, 298; at Cowpens, 299; and his daughter, 300-07, 318-21, 372, 373; writes Larger History, 301; and Matthew Arnold, 301; summers at Holden, Mass., 305-07; a week's work, 307, 308; Life of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, 307, 308; writes Women and Men, 308; in politics, 308-10, 317, 318; company reunion, 310; on dreams, 310, 311; Monarch of Dreams, 311, 312; and E
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 10: forecast (search)
eged influence of the so-called Puritan tradition. 2. The alleged materialism of the age. 3. The mainly scientific tendency of education and thought. Let us consider these in order: The alleged obstacle of Puritanism. 1. It was Matthew Arnold who maintained that the Puritan spirit in America was utterly hostile to literature and art. As to the Puritan period, it is needless to say that the forest pioneer did not compose orchestral symphonies or the founders of a nation carve stat Grant that nowhere in America have we yet got within those three fields,--we will not say of Shakespeare, but of Goethe, of Voltaire, even of Heine,--the hunt has at least been interesting, and we know not what to-morrow may bring forth. Matthew Arnold indignantly protested against regarding Emerson as another Plato, but thought that if he were to be classed with Marcus Aurelius or Epictetus, a better case might be made out; and certainly that is something, while we wait for the duplicate P
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, chapter 13 (search)
. Tennyson Poet-Laureate. 1850. Tennyson's In Memoriam. 1852. Thackeray's Henry Esmond. 1853. Kingsley's Hypatia. 1854-1856. Crimean War. 1856. Matthew Arnold's Poems. 1857. Indian Mutiny. 1859. Darwin's Origin of species. 1859. George Eliot's Adam Bede. 1862. Spencer's First principles. 1864. Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. 1864. Newman's Apologia. 1865. Matthew Arnold's Essays in criticism. 1866. Swinburne's Poems and ballads. 1867. Disraeli Prime Minister. 1867. Parliamentary Reform Bill. 1868. Browning's The Ring and the book. 1868. Gladstone Prime Minister. 1870. D. G. Rossetti's Poems. 1873. Walterenson's Virginibus Puerisque. 1881. Carlyle died. 1885. Austin Dobson's At the sign of the Lyre. 1887. Kipling's Plain tales from the Hills. 1887. Matthew Arnold died. 1888. Bryce's The American Commonwealth. 1889. Browning died. 1892. Tennyson died. 1899. South African War. 1901. Queen Victoria died.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
Poe's, 214. Alcott, Amos Bronson, 179, 180-182. Alcott, Louisa M., 126. Alden, Capt., John, 139. Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, 264. All's well, Wasson's, 264. Americanism, 3, 159. American Humor, 242, 243. American poetical Miscellany, 68. Ames, Fisher, 4, 46. Ames, Nathaniel, 58. Ancient Mariner, Coleridge's, 68. A New home, Who'll follow? Mrs. Kirkland's, 240. Appeal for that class of Americans called Africans, Mrs. Child's, 125. Areopagitica, Milton's, 165. Arnold, Matthew, 266, 283. Arthur Gordon Pym, Poe's, 208. Arthur Mervyn, Brown's, 70. Astoria, Irving's, 240. Astronomical diary and almanac, Ames's, 58. Atlantic monthly, 106, 132, 133, 158, 162. Audubon, John James, 239. Austin, William, 187. Autocrat of the breakfast table, Holmes's, 157, 158. Bancroft, George, 87, 111, 117, 143. Barclay of Ury, Whittier's, 147. Barlow, Joel, 38. Battle of the Kegs, Hopkinson's, 55. Baudelaire, 208. Beauclerc, Lady, Diana, 168. Beautif
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
ude from Yale College, the legend upon the map prefixed to each of his volumes, might be their motto. His opinions upon Elizabethan writers, upon architecture, upon the drama, upon Greek and Roman literature, would be incredible if they did not stare us in the face from cold type. His genuine powers are rendered nugatory by his incompetence in the realms of taste and imagination. He is the complete Puritan, inhospitable to art but thoroughly efficient in dealing with things; and—to modify Arnold's formula concerning the Philistine—a maker of farms that produce, of sermons that edify, of a college that educates, and of characters that wear. His want of adequate standards leaves his book a miscellany, not so much because there are all sorts of things in it as because of their huge artistic incongruities; not so much because of the variety of its contents as because of the unplumbed gaps between their literary levels. Yet this is not to say that after some acquaintance with the Tra
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 24: Lowell (search)
the direction of literary criticism, they may be regarded as less important than those which Matthew Arnold was writing during the same decade. But this is mainly due to the fact that Arnold's literaArnold's literary criticism was a part of a definite propaganda. When he gave up poetry and turned to prose, it was with the pronounced intention of getting at the British public, of entering on controversy, of pree of ineffectuality. If he did not proclaim a definite evangel, yet scarcely less potently than Arnold he preached the gospel of culture. To a nation torn by war and largely engaged in the indispenspirit. The cause of culture, indeed, called for a different service in the two countries. For Arnold in England, literature was to be given a renewed allegiance in the face of industrialism and sci suggest the different tasks of literary criticism in the two countries. It was unnecessary for Arnold to preach the value of medieval art. The Middle Ages were still very much present in England, an
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
merican Revolution, 115 Anne, Queen of England, 348 Annie Laurie, 275, 298 Annual register, the, 104, 105 Antiquities of the Southern Indians, Particularly of the Georgia Tribes, 317 Appeal to Pharaoh, an, 325 Apple Pie and Cheese, 243 Appleton, Frances Elizabeth, 36 Arabian nights, 260 Argonaut, the, 387 Argus, the (Croswell, E.), 183 Argus of Western America, the (Kendall, G. W.), 184 Aristotle, 197, 320 Arme Heinrich, der, 39 Arnold, George, 242 Arnold, Matthew, 203, 245, 253, 254 Artemus Ward. See Browne, C. F. Arthur, Chester A., 110 Ascham, Roger, 124 Ashby, Turner, 305, 306 Ashes of glory, 309 Aspern papers, the, 376 Astroea at the Capital, 283 Astronomy and General physics considered with reference to natural theology, 221 As you like it, 12 At close range, 392 At Fredericksburg, 281 Atlanta Constitution, the, 321-322, 350 Atlantic magazine, the, 167 Atlantic monthly, the, 47, 165, 169, 228, 247, 331, 369
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 3: the third and fourth generation (search)
rovement led him not only to try his hand upon an abridgment of the Book of Common Prayer, but to go even so far as to propose seriously a new rendering of the Lord's Prayer. His famous proposal for a new version of the Bible, however, which Matthew Arnold solemnly held up to reprobation, was only a joke which Matthew Arnold did not see — the new version of Job being, in fact, a clever bit of political satire against party leadership in England. Even more brilliant examples of his skill in polMatthew Arnold did not see — the new version of Job being, in fact, a clever bit of political satire against party leadership in England. Even more brilliant examples of his skill in political satire are his imaginary Edict of the King of Prussia against England, and his famous Rules for Reducing a great Empire to a Small one. But I must not try to call the roll of all the good things in Franklin's ten volumes. I will simply say that those who know Franklin only in his Autobiography, charming as that classic production is, have made but an imperfect acquaintance with the range, the vitality, the vigor of this admirable craftsman who chose a style smooth, clear, and short, an
1 2 3 4 5 6 7