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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 5 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 2 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
d in placing these troops. It was a little after 6 o'clock in the morning when I sent out Colonel Osterhaus with Captain Asmussen of my staff to reconnoiter the ground on which I intended to deploy, and to find the nearest road leading to it. The this to General Curtis, made him acquainted with the object in view, told him that I expected Colonel Osterhaus and Captain Asmussen back every moment, and finally asked him to give me ten minutes time to wait for them, when I would move immediatelyienced in my position away from him on the left, and what my intention was to do in the morning, although I had sent Captain Asmussen to his headquarters to report to him, receiving, however, no orders from him in return. After our conversation, whitold Colonel Osterhaus to take charge of our column and move it to the position to be occupied; then, accompanied by Captain Asmussen, I rode to the front, where Davis's division had formed into line, to see what was going on. I found one of our batt
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
rect and enfilading fires. General Hooker's advance did not commence until after 12 m. During the mean time fire of sharpshooters, skirmishers, and of artillery was kept up all along our line. 1 p. m., sent word to Major-General Hooker, by Colonel Asmussen, his assistant inspectorgeneral, and also by Captain Stevens, of General Stanley's staff, to call on this corps for re-enforcements whenever he wished them. 1.10 p. in., sent word by a staff officer to division commanders that Hooker was ascending the hill he was to storm on our left, and that they must now push ahead and press the enemy. 2.20, Colonel Asmussen reported that General Hooker had secured a lodgment on the ridge, and that he wished the Fourth Corps to make a demonstration and he would advance along it. A demonstration was made along our entire line. Generals Hazen and Willich, of Wood's division, stormed the enemy's works in their front, but the force of the enemy was so strong, and the direct and enfilading fire of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
e, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. General Barlow. Somebody's guns thundered away for a few short minutes, and then came the fitful rattle of musketry; and before I could again get into the saddle there arose the ceaseless roar of the terrible storm. I sent out my chief-of-staff, Colonel Asmussen, who was the first officer to mount,--The firing is in front of Devens, go and see if all is in order on the extreme right. He instantly turned and galloped away. I mounted and set off for a prominent place in rear of Schurz's line, so as
sels the day previous. The troops of the corps, while in front of the rebel works, suffered a number of casualties. Amongst those killed, was Lieutenant C. A. Ahruts, One. Hundred and Thirty-fourth New-York volunteers, assistant to Lieutenant-Colonel Asmussen, Inspector-General of the corps — an excellent and faithful young officer. Amongst the severely wounded was Colonel John H. Ketcham, One Hundred and Fiftieth New-York volunteers, an officer of superior intelligence and worth. Major Win McDowell, Chief Topographical Engineer for the corps, showing the positions of the several divisions at each camp during the march from Atlanta to Savannah. These positions were laid down and the notes accompanying the maps kept by Lieutenant-Colonel Asmussen, Inspector-General of the corps. The faithful and skilful manner in which this work is done, presents a complete and accurate view of the daily marches of the corps. Tabular statement marked A, shows the casualties of the corps by di
sels the day previous. The troops of the corps, while in front of the rebel works, suffered a number of casualties. Amongst those killed, was Lieutenant C. A. Ahruts, One. Hundred and Thirty-fourth New-York volunteers, assistant to Lieutenant-Colonel Asmussen, Inspector-General of the corps — an excellent and faithful young officer. Amongst the severely wounded was Colonel John H. Ketcham, One Hundred and Fiftieth New-York volunteers, an officer of superior intelligence and worth. Major Win McDowell, Chief Topographical Engineer for the corps, showing the positions of the several divisions at each camp during the march from Atlanta to Savannah. These positions were laid down and the notes accompanying the maps kept by Lieutenant-Colonel Asmussen, Inspector-General of the corps. The faithful and skilful manner in which this work is done, presents a complete and accurate view of the daily marches of the corps. Tabular statement marked A, shows the casualties of the corps by di
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 22: battle of Chancellorsville (search)
had filled these intrenchments, which had been prepared for Barlow's brigade, with fragments of regiments and individual men in retreat, who had volunteered to stay and help. In the outset of the conflict I instantly sent a staff officer (Colonel Asmussen) to see that all was right in the direction of the firing. After Colonel Asmussen left me I had proceeded some 200 yards toward my reserve batteries, when the louder firing reached my ears and I saw Von Gilsa's men running back from their pColonel Asmussen left me I had proceeded some 200 yards toward my reserve batteries, when the louder firing reached my ears and I saw Von Gilsa's men running back from their position. Immediately I made an effort to change the front of part of Devens's and all of Schurz's division. The rush of the enemy made this impossible. To render matters worse for me personally my horse got crazy, like some of the panic-stricken men, and plunged and reared and left me on the ground. Of course, I was soon mounted, but this hindered and delayed my personal work. Steinwehr, who was always at hand, at this juncture brought me two regiments. For a time the reserve artillery a
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 26: transferred to the West; battle of Wauhatchie (search)
nd I could not go on to join the corps and the General, who had already reached Bridgeport, on the Tennessee River, his destination for the present. I found Colonel Asmussen, chief of staff, and other officers here. Some of our freight and artillery horses had not yet passed this place. The rear of the corps is all at Nashville now, and we will march by land next Saturday morning, in order that the railroad, as soon as open, may be free for supplies. Colonel Asmussen--a most energetic worker-had, after many troublesome delays, secured the wagons and artillery horses at Nashville, and was coming on. We had with us ten days rations for the men, but mylosely and gave us annoyance. To add a little to our store of information we had captured two cavalrymen, who were held as prisoners. My inspector general, Colonel Asmussen, probed them with questions. By their reluctant accounts the position and strength of the enemy was made more clear. The next morning, October 28th, the c
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
July, 1863 80, 12 Anderson, Robert: Charleston Harbor, S. C. 1, 1-3; 2, 1-3 Andrews, Christopher C.: Fort Blakely, Ala., April 9, 1865 61, 6 Andrews, N. S.: Bowling Green, Ky. 103, 1 Andrew., William S.: Roanoke Island, N. C., Feb. 8, 1862 12, 6 Anstey, E. G.: Chickamauga, Campaign, Aug. 16-Sept. 22, 1863 48, 1 Arms, G. H.: Belmont, Mo., Jan. 2, 1862 4, 2 Aschbach, G. A.: Cincinnati, Ohio, Covington and Newport, Ky. 103, 2 Asmussen, Charles W.: Atlanta to Savannah, Ga., Nov. 15-Dec. 21, 1864 71, 1-11 Savannah, Ga., Dec. 11-21, 1864 71, 10, 11 Savannah, Ga., to Goldsborough, N. C. 80, 1-11 Atkinson, W. G.: Bull Run, Va., July 21, 1861 3, 2 Averell, William W.: Droop Mountain, W. Va., Nov. 6, 1863 135-B, 2 New Creek Station, W. Va., Aug., 1863 135-C, 2 Western Virginia (part of), 1863 135-C, 1 White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., Aug. 26-27, 1863 135-B, 3 Bache, A. D.: