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ebagoes. Red Bird. aversion to letter-writing. the angry flute-player. General Atkinson and his wife. Johnston's standing as an officer. a suicide. his charityantry, to take date from July 1, 1826. The Sixth, commanded by brevet Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, was then esteemed the crack regiment; so that at once he proced to negotiate with General Cass, who thereupon turned the matter over to General Atkinson. The expedition left Prairie du Chien on the 29th of August, and returned828 Lieutenant Johnston was selected as adjutant of the regiment by Brevet-General Henry Atkinson, the colonel commanding. Atkinson was an officer of fair military Atkinson was an officer of fair military capacity and experience, of a bright and social temper, and of popular manners. General Scott, in his autobiography, calls him an excellent man and fine soldier; andnd the eldest of a family celebrated for beauty, wit, and charm of manner. Mrs. Atkinson, aided, after the lapse of some years, by her brilliant and beautiful siste
ohnston's journal. movements of troops. General Atkinson's negotiations for peace. Pacific course report, as assistant adjutant-general of General Atkinson, but his private journal furnished the moar: On the 1st of April, 1832, Brigadier-General Atkinson, then commanding the right wing, Wesn obedience to the above-mentioned order, General Atkinson set off for the Upper Mississippi, with sad the power. The speakers also informed General Atkinson that Black Hawk was eight or nine miles ufatigue and insufficiency of proper food, General Atkinson selected about 900 of the best mounted von, had been interposed, under orders from General Atkinson, to cut off his retreat; and a sharp skirre to stop the effusion of blood, induced General Atkinson to desist from the pursuit of the miserabthe presence of an overpowering force, to General Atkinson, as he had yielded to General Gaines the of War addressed the following letter to General Atkinson: Department of War, October 24, 1882. [16 more...]
it as a memento of the event. He was ever afterward a warm friend of General Johnston. From Mr. Groce's Mr. Johnston proceeded to the headquarters of the army, which were then on the river Coleto, about fifteen miles east of Goliad. Although Mr. Johnston bore with him the highest testimonials to his personal worth and military ability, in the form of letters of introduction from persons of distinction in the United States to the leading men of Texas, he forbore to deliver them. General Atkinson had sent him a letter to Stephen F. Austin, couched in language of the highest eulogy; and personal friends of Houston, Rusk, and others, had also given him letters that would have secured him a cordial welcome at their hands; but, with that peculiar combination of pride and conscientiousness which made him unwilling to receive advancement as a favor, and, it may be, somewhat in the spirit of knight-errantry, he preferred to reach his destination unannounced, and then enlisted as a pri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Talcott, Andrew 1797-1883 (search)
Talcott, Andrew 1797-1883 Civil engineer; born in Glastonbury, Conn., April 20, 1797; graduated at the United States Military Academy, and commissioned second lieutenant in the engineer corps in 1818; served for a year on construction duty; then accompanied Gen. Henry Atkinson as engineer on the expedition to establish military posts on the upper Missouri and Yellowstone rivers. On his return he was engaged on the construction of the defences of Hampton Roads, Va., till 1835. He resigned his commission in 1836. He devised the Talcott method for determining territorial latitudes by observations of stars near the zenith. He died in Richmond, Va., April 22, 1883.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
Adams, then President, as Second Lieutenant of the Sixth regiment of infantry, then regarded as the crack regiment of the army, under the command of Brigadier General Henry Atkinson. He reported for duty on the first of June. Lieutenant Johnston's first military service was performed in the expedition sent from Prairie-du-Chither. He said: I have offended. I sacrifice myself to save my country. In 1828, Lieutenant Johnston was selected as Adjutant of his regiment by Brigadier General Henry Atkinson. The Colonel commanding, Colonel T. L. Alexander, who joined the regiment in 1830 says of him at this time: Possessing in an extraordinary degree th. When Mr. Johnston reached the Texan army, then under the command of General Thomas J. Rusk, though he bore letters of introduction from his old commander, General Atkinson of the Fifth infantry, and other distinguished persons in the States, he, with his instinctive dread of being an office seeker, quietly volunteered in the li
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
Adams, then President, as Second Lieutenant of the Sixth regiment of infantry, then regarded as the crack regiment of the army, under the command of Brigadier General Henry Atkinson. He reported for duty on the first of June. Lieutenant Johnston's first military service was performed in the expedition sent from Prairie-du-Chither. He said: I have offended. I sacrifice myself to save my country. In 1828, Lieutenant Johnston was selected as Adjutant of his regiment by Brigadier General Henry Atkinson. The Colonel commanding, Colonel T. L. Alexander, who joined the regiment in 1830 says of him at this time: Possessing in an extraordinary degree th. When Mr. Johnston reached the Texan army, then under the command of General Thomas J. Rusk, though he bore letters of introduction from his old commander, General Atkinson of the Fifth infantry, and other distinguished persons in the States, he, with his instinctive dread of being an office seeker, quietly volunteered in the li
Robberies. --The police yesterday arrested Mike, slave of John Greanor; Boston, slave of Mrs. Marin Hunt; and Richard, slave of Henry Atkinson, charged with stealing one barrel of crushed sugar from Robert Lacy.--Mary, the property of Harman Woodward, was also arrested for stealing three pounds of sugar and a small lot of eggs and lard from George A. Gathright.--Another negro, named Sam, the property of George W. Bagby, was arrested for stealing a lot of pork from H. Ammons.--All of these parties were lodged in the lower Station-House.
y. John Ryan was charged with beating Jas Kelly, and stealing from him $200 in Confederate money and a gold ring valued at $50. Several witnesses were examined in this case, whose evidence was sufficiently convincing to induce the Mayor to send him on to the Hustings Court. A soldier named William C. Gay, who obtained lodgings in the watch house on Friday night last upon his own application, was ordered by the Mayor to proceed immediately to his regiment. William, slave of Henry Atkinson, was ordered to be whipped for having in his possession seven bottles of liquor, and a lot of crushed sugar, supposed to have been stolen. The whiskey and sugar can be found at the Mayor's office, where the owner can go and identify it. A negro boy named George was whipped for stealing two chickens from Washington Jenkins. Patrick McKenna was fined five dollars for allowing an unlawful assembly of negroes to assemble at his house. He was also charged with renting a house out