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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), George (Lewis) 1660- (search)
George (Lewis) 1660- King of Great Britain, born in Osnabruck, Hanover, May 28, 1660; eldest son of Ernest Augustus, Elector of Hanover, and the first sovereign of the Hanoverian line. His mother was Sophia, daughter of James I. of England. In 1681 he went to England to seek the hand of his cousin, the Princess Anne (afterwards Queen), in marriage, but, being ordered by his father not to proceed in the business, he returned, and married his cousin Sophia Dorothea. By act of the convention of Parliament in 1689, and by Parliament in 1701, the succession of the English crown was so fixed that in the event of a failure of heirs by William and Mary, and Anne, it should be limited to the Electress Sophia, of Hanover, George's mother, passing over nearer heirs who were Roman Catholics. By the treaty of union with Scotland (1707) the same succession was secured for its crown. By the death of Sophia three months before Queen Anne died, George became heir-apparent to the throne of
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Victoria, Queen of England. (search)
In all the world there was but one person who could rightfully succeed Queen Anne, and that was an elderly lady known to the people of England as the Princess Sophia, and to the people of Hanover as the wife of their sovereign, the elector, Ernest Augustus. King James the First left but two children of the seven who had been born to him. One of these was the unfortunate Charles the First, who lost his crown and his head; the other was the Princess Elizabeth, who in due time married Frederick the Fifth, Elector Palatine, one of the hundred petty sovereigns of Germany. The Princess Sophia was the daughter of this pair, and she was married to Ernest Augustus of Hanover. Being thus the granddaughter of James the First, and the wife of a Protestant prince, her right to the English throne, in case Queen Anne died without issue, was unquestionable; and hence, in the act of settlement of 1701, she was declared the heiress presumptive. She had become a widow, and was living in retireme