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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
. Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in Nashville Banner. The coming of the remnants of that army in gray, whose deeds so astonished the world a third of a century ago, and the presence among us here of the last survivor of the cabinet of President Davis, brings vividly bnooga and St. Louis Railway. We are two small a body to think of reunions. We sometimes meet, not as ships that pass in the night, but on the car or around the engine of to-day, and discuss those old days of the past—the days that the average railroad man of to-day knows so little about or can comprehend how armies were moved and provisioned by the Southern roads, and how trains were run. We are, like the survivors, fast passing away, and will soon be known no more. Colonel J. H. Averill
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
Richmond, Virginia. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, July 4, 1897.] the evacuation of the City and the days preceding it. How the news was received in Danville—Some of the closing scenes of the Confederacy vividly recalled. Colonel J. H. Averill in Nashville Banner. The coming of the remnants of that army in gray, whose deeds so astonished the world a third of a century ago, and the presence among us here of the last survivor of the cabinet of President Davis, brings vividly back anooga and St. Louis Railway. We are two small a body to think of reunions. We sometimes meet, not as ships that pass in the night, but on the car or around the engine of to-day, and discuss those old days of the past—the days that the average railroad man of to-day knows so little about or can comprehend how armies were moved and provisioned by the Southern roads, and how trains were run. We are, like the survivors, fast passing away, and will soon be known no more. Colonel J. H. Averill
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Index. Abbeville, S. C., Distinguished men of, 56. Alabama Heroine, An, 45. Alexandria, Retrocession of, 197. Allen, Major, Wm., 139. Ambulance Corps, The Richmond, Members of, 113. Anderson, General Joseph R., 211. Appomattox, Surrender at, 20, 263. Archer, Colonel Fletcher H., 12. Ashford, Col., John, 257. Atkinson, Col., John Wilder, 38, 139. Averill, Col. J. H., 267. Baldwin, Joseph G , 22. Barlow, Captain J. W., 139. Barker, Capt. F. C., 366. Barnes, Gen. W. F., 78. Beauregard, Gen. G. T., 206 Benjamin, Judah P., Sketch of, 297, 378. Bennett, Captain, Frank, 171. Bingham, apt. Robert 345. Blacknall, Col. C. C., 168, 173. Blacknall, Dr., Geo. W., 168. Blacknall, Dr., Oscar, 168. Blacknall, Maj. T. H., 168. Blake, Capt. T. B., 139, 286. Blow, Capt. W. N, 275 Boonsboro, Battle of, 162, 276 Boyd, Miss, Belle, 165. Boy Heroes at Cold Harbor, 234. Brandy Station, Battle of, 148, 168. Bristow Station, Battle of, 339. Bull