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The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Averill raiders — a probability of their capture. (search)
The Averill raiders — a probability of their capture. What little information we have with reference to the Yankees under Averill justice the hope at least that the greater portion of the force will be captured. Finding the road to the Sweet Springs effectually obstructed, they took a road leading by way of junction Store anAverill justice the hope at least that the greater portion of the force will be captured. Finding the road to the Sweet Springs effectually obstructed, they took a road leading by way of junction Store and the Roaring Run Furnaces in Botetourt, which intersects the Fincastle and Covington road about six miles from Covington. On Saturday night they camped in the Rich Patch Valley, and on Sunday morning resumed their march towards Covington. They had destroyed their entire wagon train, consisting of forty negroes, and their artillers behind the enemy, whose horses were completely broken down, and little doubt was entertained that the entire party would be caught. Another report stated that Averill, finding himself hard pushed, had attempted to ford Jackson's river at Clifton Forge, and that in the attempt a number of his men were drowned, which caused him t
The enemy in the Valley. During the latter part of last week the enemy made a bold strike for the relief of Averill. A heavy column of their cavalry saved up the Valley as far as Mt. Crawford, eighteen miles below Staunton. Finding that they were in danger of being cut off, they bent a hasty retreat, and left poor Averill to work himself out of his difficulties. It was stated last night — whether reliably or not we cannot say — that a portion of our forces had reached Martinsburg, emy made a bold strike for the relief of Averill. A heavy column of their cavalry saved up the Valley as far as Mt. Crawford, eighteen miles below Staunton. Finding that they were in danger of being cut off, they bent a hasty retreat, and left poor Averill to work himself out of his difficulties. It was stated last night — whether reliably or not we cannot say — that a portion of our forces had reached Martinsburg, on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and torn up the tract of that