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ates, The, proverty of at close of Revolution, 18; obstacles to transportation in, 19. Aughey, Rev. John A., of Miss., reference to, 350; extract from his Iron furnace, 514. Augusta, Ga., seizure of the Federal Arsenal, 411; a letter from, in testimony of the common use of deadly weapons by the Southrons, 500. Agusta (Ga.) Chronicle, The, extract from, 123; citation from. Death to the Abolitionist, 128; citation from, 347. Austin, Moses, 148. Austin, Stephen, F., 148; 150. Avery, William W., of N. C., 278; his resolves in the Democratic National Convention, 309-10; his speech there, 311; 318. Avis, camp. John, referred to in one of John Brown's letters, 296; his treatment of old Brown, 289. Ayres, Capt., engaged at Blackburn's Ford, 539. B. Badger, George E., of N. C., wants liberty to take his old mammy to Kansas, 231; 2:32. Baker, Col. Edward D., 422; reinforces Col. Devens at Ball's Bluff, 622; his death, 623; orders from Gen. Stone to, 624.
ments and in the city included 69 cannon, two steamboats, large quantities of munitions and stores, with some 500 prisoners. Our total loss was about 100 killed and 500 wounded: the former including Lt.-Col. Henry Merritt, 23d Massachusetts, Adjt. Frazer A. Stearns, of the 21st, Maj. Charles W. Le Gendre and Capt. D. R. Johnson, of the 51st, and Capt. Charles Tillinghast, of the 4th Rhode Island. The Rebel loss, beside prisoners, hardly exceeded 200, including Maj. Carmichael, killed, and Col. Avery, captured. Gen. Burnside, having undisturbed possession of Newbern, sent Gen. Parke March 20. with his brigade, 3,500 strong, southwestward to the coast, where he occupied March 23. Morehead City without resistance; as also the more important village of Beaufort, across the inlet known as Newport river; and proceeded to invest Fort Macon, a regular fortress of great cost and strength, seized by Gov. Ellis before the secession of the State. See Vol. I., p. 411. This work stands
Xxvi. West Virginia and North of the Rapidan in 1864. Sam Jones captures Beers at Jonesville Rosser takes Petersburg Averill hits him at Springfield Sigel's defeat at Newmarket Averill worsted at Wytheville Crook's fight near Dublin Station Hunter's victory at Piedmont he takes Staunton, and advances to Lynchburg retreats across the Alleghauies Early chases Sigel out of Virginia Wallace beaten on the Monocacy Early threatens Washington Wright repulsed by Early Avery worsted near Winchester Early defeats Crook Chambersburg burned by McCausland Col. Stough routed at Oldtown Sheridan appointed to command beats Early at Opequan routs him at Fisher's Hill devastates the Valley the Richmond Whig on retaliation Early surprises Crook at Cedar creek Sheridan transforms defeat into victory losses. the anaconda is a clumsy, sluggish beast; effecting his ends by an enormous, even lavish expenditure of force; but Grant's anaconda differed from that of Scott
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
my during the day. No other engagements of infantry occurred than attempts by the skirmishers of each army to harass those of the other. But late in the afternoon a large body of Federal cavalry, probably feeling for our right flank, encountered Avery's regiment of Georgia cavalry. Although desperately wounded in the onset, Colonel Avery, supported in his saddle by a soldier, continued to command, and maintained the contest until the arrival of forces capable of holding the ground. The FeColonel Avery, supported in his saddle by a soldier, continued to command, and maintained the contest until the arrival of forces capable of holding the ground. The Federal troops extended their intrenched line so rapidly to their left, that it was found necessary in the morning of the 27th to transfer Cleburne's division of Hardee's corps to our right, where it was formed on the prolongation of Polk's line. Kelly's cavalry, composed of Allen's and Hannon's Alabama brigades, together less than a thousand men, occupied the interval, of half a mile, between Cleburne's right and Little Pumpkin-Vine Creek. Martin's division (cavalry) guarded the road from Bur
orks on the right of the railroad, I led the Twenty-fifth Massachusetts to their support, and received the surrender of Col. Avery and one hundred and fifty men. The breastwork we had entered was similar in construction to the abandoned one, runni It is thought they were taken prisoners. Their names are given us as Prof. Iradella, James Wood and Frank Hineman. Col. Avery's regiment, the Thirty-third, suffered severely, and fought well. Col. Avery and Major Hoke are reported killed. We tCol. Avery and Major Hoke are reported killed. We trust that it is not so, but fear that it is. Col. Lee was reported killed, but we learn that this is not so. His horse is said to have been killed under him, and this, no doubt, gave rise to the report that he had been killed. His regiment also stoo was five hundred. Burnside admits that the Yankee loss in killed, wounded and prisoners was one thousand five hundred. Major Carmichael, of the Twenty-sixth North-Carolina regiment, was the only field-officer killed. Col. Avery was made prisoner.
and wounded, but nothing positive respecting that is known. On our side one man was severely wounded. A Minie ball passed directly through his left arm, below the elbow, shattering it badly, and probably necessitating amputation. He was a private, named John Leonard, of Capt. Duffy's company A, and resides in New-Haven. After the gallant fellow was shot, he picked up his gun with his right hand, and leaning it on the stump of a tree, fired one more shot at the rebels. Drs. Gallagher and Avery, of the Ninth, are doing their best for the unfortunate man, and hope to save his arm. As the rebels fled they attempted to burn a bridge over a small piece of water, lying between their camp and the place of the skirmish; but our troops were too fast for them and prevented it. At about five o'clock in the afternoon, our troops reached Camp Suggville, (the name of the rebel camp.) There they found evidences of the most sudden departure. Dinners cooked and waiting to be eaten; clothing
evere fire, eager to get as near the enemy's right wing as possible before the time came for the charge. About one hour and a half was thus consumed before Hawkins arrived, with but a slight loss on either side, no musketry having been fired up to this time. Only the batteries were engaged. At three o'clock Col. Hawkins came up with the Ninth New-York, (the Hawkins Zouaves,) the Eighty-ninth New-York, and Sixth New-Hampshire, with Col. Howard's other two howitzers. Lieuts. Gerard and Avery of the Union Coast Guard, were the captains of these guns. Gen. Reno ordered Col. Hawkins with the Ninth New-York and Eighty-ninth New-York to the right in the woods to the support of the Twenty-first Massachusetts and Fifty-first Pennsylvania, and to work around the right wing of the enemy and get into his rear, so as to cut off his retreat if it was possible. The Sixth New-Hampshire was ordered by Gen. Reno to the woods on the left, to keep possession of the road that led to the east,
setts at Newbern were despatched to Washington. Lieut. Avery, of the marine artillery, with three of Wiard's th Massachusetts, except C and D, came next, and Lieut. Avery, with two of his steel howitzers and twenty-five a bridge of slabs, near which the mill stands. Lieut. Avery now opened with grape, canister and solid shot uoolest bravery throughout the brief engagement. Lieut. Avery and his brave little body of marines also foughtCol. Howard's marine artillery, under command of Lieut. Avery. The infantry and artillery having taken up t takes to narrate it, the gallant marines, under Lieut. Avery, came dashing down the hill with their guns, whie, the engagement regularly opened on our side. Lieut. Avery discharged several rounds of shell and canister ng very briskly when driven out by a shell which Lieut. Avery lodged in the building. Others again were discohe tree-tops on the opposite side of the creek. Lieut. Avery elevated his piece and fired a couple of rounds
dred and fifty men, and came out with one hundred and twenty-five; the One Hundred and Second New-York with nearly four hundred men, and has but Major Lane and Captain Avery with sixty-six men remaining, To the Editor of the New-York Tribune: sir: I saw a statement in your paper of the thirteenth that only sixty-six out of four hundred in our battalion came safely off the battle-ground on the ninth, and the only officers uninjured were Major Lane and Captain Avery. This report is erroneous. Though only sixty-six did leave the ground with us uninjured, we took only one hundred and sixty enlisted men and twenty-one officers into the fight. Of these,the One Hundred and Second New-York and the One Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania drew special mention. Major Lane, who commanded the One Hundred and Second, and Captain Avery, are the only officers left. The little band of sixty-six gathered together this morning spoke in high terms of the conduct of their officers. They were cons
dred and fifty men, and came out with one hundred and twenty-five; the One Hundred and Second New-York with nearly four hundred men, and has but Major Lane and Captain Avery with sixty-six men remaining, To the Editor of the New-York Tribune: sir: I saw a statement in your paper of the thirteenth that only sixty-six out of four hundred in our battalion came safely off the battle-ground on the ninth, and the only officers uninjured were Major Lane and Captain Avery. This report is erroneous. Though only sixty-six did leave the ground with us uninjured, we took only one hundred and sixty enlisted men and twenty-one officers into the fight. Of these,the One Hundred and Second New-York and the One Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania drew special mention. Major Lane, who commanded the One Hundred and Second, and Captain Avery, are the only officers left. The little band of sixty-six gathered together this morning spoke in high terms of the conduct of their officers. They were cons
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