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p Christian friends to visit and write to you in your deep affliction. I have no doubt that some of them, at least, will heed the call. Write to me, care of Capt. John Avis, Charlestown, Jefferson County, Va. Finally, my beloved, be of good comfort. May all your names be written in the Lamb's book of life --may you all haong, exclaimed: God bless you, old man! I wish I could help you; but I can't. He looked at her with a tear in his eye. He mounted the wagon beside his jailor, Capt. Avis, who had been one of the bravest of his captors, who had treated him very kindly, and to whom he was profoundly grateful. The wagon was instantly surrounded by at the foot of the gallows, and was first to mount the scaffold. His step was still firm, and his bearing calm, yet hopeful. The hour having come, he said to Capt. Avis: I have no words to thank you for all your kindness to me. His elbows and ankles being pinioned, the white cap drawn over his eyes, the hangman's rope adjusted
ference to, 350; extract from his Iron furnace, 514. Augusta, Ga., seizure of the Federal Arsenal, 411; a letter from, in testimony of the common use of deadly weapons by the Southrons, 500. Agusta (Ga.) Chronicle, The, extract from, 123; citation from. Death to the Abolitionist, 128; citation from, 347. Austin, Moses, 148. Austin, Stephen, F., 148; 150. Avery, William W., of N. C., 278; his resolves in the Democratic National Convention, 309-10; his speech there, 311; 318. Avis, camp. John, referred to in one of John Brown's letters, 296; his treatment of old Brown, 289. Ayres, Capt., engaged at Blackburn's Ford, 539. B. Badger, George E., of N. C., wants liberty to take his old mammy to Kansas, 231; 2:32. Baker, Col. Edward D., 422; reinforces Col. Devens at Ball's Bluff, 622; his death, 623; orders from Gen. Stone to, 624. Bagby, Arthur P., of Ala., on Annexation, 174. Bailey, Godard, an account of his defalcations at Washington, 410-11. Ba
Aug. 21, 1760, Jane, d. of Wm. Pepperell, of Kittery (who had m. twice before; viz., 1st, Benjamin Clark; and, 2d, Wm. Tyler), who d. Feb. 6, 1765. He had issue only by his first wife; viz.,--  19-20Samuel, b. Feb. 2, 1729; d. Oct. 8, 1736.  20 1/2Clark-Thomas, bapt. Aug. 18, 1728; d. young.   And two children who d. infants. 4-18CHRISTIAN Turell m., 1st, Samuel Bass; 2d, John Armstrong.  21Joseph Turell, who is supposed to have been a cousin of Rev. Ebenezer T., m., 1st, a dau. of John Avis, and had--  21-22Joseph, b. 1750.  23Elizabeth, b. 1755; m.----Noyes.  24Samuel, b. 1757.   He m., 2d, Mary Morey, of Roxbury, and had--  25A dau., m. Ed. Gray; ch. were Mrs. Fales, Edward Gray, John Gray, and the late F. T. Gray. 21-22Joseph Turell, jun., m.--------, and had two sons, Charles and John; of whom Charles had several children, one of whom, Garland, is a resident of Boston.  1Usher, Hezekiah, was a prominent merchant of Boston, and in his will, dated March 11, 16
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: sword in hand. (search)
of the depot on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. I here formed two companies of the citizens, and placed them under the command of Captain Lawson Botts and Captain John Avis. Their forces were variously estimated from three hundred to five hundred strong, armed with Sharpe's rifles and revolvers. I detached the Jefferson Guaridge, to leave a strong guard at that point, and to march down to the Gait House, in rear of the Arsenal building, in which we supposed their men were lodged. Captain Avis's command was ordered to take possession of the houses directly in front of the Arsenal. Both of the above commands were promptly executed. By this movement ary of War, the 15th day of October, 1859. John Brown, Commander-in-Chief. J. H. Kagi, Secretary of War. While the fight at the rifle works was going on, Captain Avis and his company took possession of the houses around the Armory buildings. As they were doing so, Captain Turner, who had opened the fire in the morning, was
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, chapter 2.44 (search)
Mr. Hunter accompanied the prisoners to Charlestown, where they were lodged in jail, and placed under the charge of Capt. John Avis. Of the jail and jailer a trust-worthy writer says: Brown is as comfortably situated as any man can be in a Stevens, whose recovery remains doubtful. He has opportunities of occupying himself by writing and reading. His jailer, Avis, was of the party who assisted in capturing him. Brown says, that Avis is one of the bravest men he ever saw, and that hisAvis is one of the bravest men he ever saw, and that his treatment is precisely what he should expect from so brave a fellow. Avis is a just and humane man. He does all for his prisoners that his duty allows him to. I think he has a sincere respect for Brown's undaunted fortitude and fearlessness. BrownAvis is a just and humane man. He does all for his prisoners that his duty allows him to. I think he has a sincere respect for Brown's undaunted fortitude and fearlessness. Brown is permitted to receive such visitors as he desires to see. He states that he welcomes every one, and that he is preaching, even in jail, with great effect, upon the enormities of Slavery, and with arguments which every body fails to answer. His wo
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
up Christian friends to visit and write to you in your deep affliction. I have no doubt that some of them at least will heed the call. Write to me, care of Capt. John Avis, Charlestown, Jefferson County, Va. Finally, my beloved, be of good comfort. May all your names be written on the Lamb's book of life --may you all have ty due from my father's estate may be paid in equal amounts to my wife, and to each of my children, and to the widows of Watson and Owen Brown, by my brother. John Avis, Witness. John Brown. A final codicil. Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., Dec. 2, 1859. It is my desire that my wife have all my personal property noof all. God Almighty bless you all, and make you joyful in the midst of all your tribulations. Write to John Brown, Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., care of Captain John Avis. Your affectionate husband and father. John Brown. Nov. 3, 1859. P. S.--Yesterday, Nov. 2, I was sentenced to be hanged on Dec. 2d next. Do not gri
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: forty days in chains. (search)
rguments that every body fails to answer. Another newspaper correspondent who visited him at this time- the days of his sentence-- says: He said that Captain Avis, his jailer, showed as much kindness in treating him, as he had shown courage in attacking him. It is what I should expect from a brave man. Seeing that one o, It was dreadful to drag him out so; but they did right to kill him. I would. Between Mr. Brown and his jailer there has grown up a most friendly feeling. Captain Avis, who is too brave to be afraid to be kind, has done all he could for the prisoners, and been cursed accordingly. Still their condition was very cheerless, anddo not believe I shall deny my Lord and Master, Jesus Christ; and I should be if I denied my principles against slavery. Why, I preach against it all the time--Captain Avis knows I do. The jailer smiled, and said, Yes. We spoke of those who, in times of trial, forgot themselves, and he said, There seems to be just that differe
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 10: husband and wife. (search)
re sanguinary conflict. At last, however, Mrs. Brown was admitted. She was kindly received by Captain and Mrs. Avis. Mrs. Avis, by order of the powers that be, conducted Mrs. Brown into a private aMrs. Avis. Mrs. Avis, by order of the powers that be, conducted Mrs. Brown into a private apartment, where her clothing was searched for concealed weapons, or other means which the morbid suspicion of the Virginia army of occupation suggested Mrs. Brown might surreptitiously convey to her Mrs. Avis, by order of the powers that be, conducted Mrs. Brown into a private apartment, where her clothing was searched for concealed weapons, or other means which the morbid suspicion of the Virginia army of occupation suggested Mrs. Brown might surreptitiously convey to her husband. In the mean time Captain Brown had been informed that his wife had arrived. The announcement was made by General Taliaferro, when the following dialogue took place: Captain Brown, d's breast, and clasping his neck with her arms. At length they sat down and spoke; and from Captain Avis, who was the only witness of that sorrowful scene, (his fellow-prisoner, Stevens, having been permitted to speak to the other prisoners. But Gen. Taliaferro's orders forbade this, though Capt. Avis expressed a willingness to permit her to see them even at the risk of violating orders. She d
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 11: the victory over death. (search)
to die. The Sheriff bade him farewell in his cell. The old man quietly thanked him for his kindness, and spoke of Captain Avis, his jailer, as a brave man. He was then led to the cell of Copeland and Green. This interview is thus reported: in and remains were to be transported to the North. John Brown mounted the wagon, and took his place in the seat with Captain Avis, the jailer, whose admiration of his prisoner is of the profoundest nature. Mr. Saddler, too, was one of John Brown'save not cast my eyes over it before — that is, while passing through the field. Yes, was the sad reply of the brave Captain Avis. You are a game man, Captain Brown, said Mr. Saddler. Yes, he said, I was so trained up; it was one of the lessotitude and insensibility to fear filled them with amazement. The hour had now come. The officer approached him. To Captain Avis he said: I have no words to thank you for all your kindness to me. His elbows and ankles are pinioned, the white ca
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, VII. Kansas and John Brown (search)
s,--a man, as it proved, of great resources,--Montgomery set out by night and was gone several days. While he examined the whole region,--his native Kentucky accent saving him from all suspicion,--his comrade penetrated into the very jail, in the guise of a jovial, half-drunken Irishman, and got speech with the prisoners, who were thus notified of the proposed rescue. They expressed great distrust of it, and this partly because, even if successful, it would endanger the life of the jailer, Avis, who had won their gratitude, as well as Brown's, by his great kindness. I have never known whether this opposition had any covert influence on the mind of Montgomery, but I know that he came back at last, and quenched all our hopes by deciding that a severe snowstorm which had just occurred rendered the enterprise absolutely hopeless. I was not at the time quite satisfied with this opinion, but it was impossible to overrule our leader; and on visiting that region and the jail itself, many
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