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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 3 (search)
ve brought it all on themselves, the cruel monsters, by refusing to exchange prisoners. But it is horrible, and a blot on the fair name of our Confederacy. Mr. Robert Bacon says he has accurate information that on the first of December, 1864, there were 13,010 graves at Anderson. It is a dreadful record. I shuddered as I passeeen appointed commandant of the Department of South Georgia and Florida, with headquarters at Tallahassee. It was nearly eleven o'clock before they got off. Mr. Robert Bacon says he met them on their way, and they told him they were so pleased with their entertainment at sister's that they wished they could have staid a day or twhould drop out of the road, as sometimes happens in this limestone country, where in the name of heaven would we go to? Sister and I spent the evening at Mrs. Robert Bacon's. The Camps, the Edwin Bacons, Capt. Wynne, and Mrs. Westmoreland were there. We enjoyed ourselves so much that we didn't break up till one o'clock Sunday
wood screws were imported from England so cheap as to render competition ruinous. John L. Sullivan, Esq., the chief agent, afterwards sold the establishment to Mr. Stowell for $4,000, through whom it came into possession of its present owner, Robert Bacon, Esq. He has built three factories and two dwelling-houses, which have been burned; three in 1840, the last in 1843. Since writing the above, we are called to record another destructive fire at Baconville of the factories there. They were burned Sunday evening, April 8, 1855. Mr. Bacon brought his machinery from Boston to Medford in 1824, and manufactured hat-bodies, feltings, &c., employing eighteen or twenty men. Once only he counted; and in that year he formed 83,000 hat-bodies. This work was done by the use of Silas Mason's patent, and T. F. Mayhew's improved machine. He also planked many thousands yearly; which operation was by the use of Macomber's patent, and his own improvement. He also blowed the hair from fur, b
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Incidents and reminiscences of the Fire Department of Medford. (search)
house twenty-two of these leathern buckets, inscribed with the name of the owner and the year of his membership, which the present company prize as relics of auld lang syne. Mr. Francis A. Wait has hanging in the front hall of his house three buckets inscribed as follows: One, John A. Fulton1785. Two, Nathan Wait1810. The following are those in the hook and ladder carriage room: Two, J. Swan1785. Two, Ebenezer Hall1785. Two, Benjamin Fisk1800. One, Daniel Swan1821. Two, Robert Bacon1822. Two, Thomas R. Peck1827. Two, Abnah Bartlettno date. One, E. Hallno date. One, Daniel Lawrence1841. One, Timothy Cottingno date. One, Samuel Chaseno date. Two, Andrew Blanchard, Columbian Eagle Fire Society. One, Nathan Sawyerno date. One, Gov. BrooksNo. 1 One, Gen'l JacksonNo. 2. We have now in the service of the city an organization bearing the name of Washington Hook and Ladder Company which has been in existence for seventy-two years without interruption. From
been a profitable industry, and though its value had greatly diminished before 1847, yet in that year $253 were paid to the town for the privilege of capturing them. On certain days in the week nets were stretched across the river at convenient places, and on being drawn to the shore, would often contain a cartload or more of the treasure. Messrs. Waterman and Litchfield were doing an extensive business in the manufacture of doors, blinds, sashes, etc., on what is now Swan street. Robert Bacon had a factory at Baconville (in northwest Medford) in which he made hat bodies, feltings, etc. He is said to have constructed more than fifty thousand hat bodies per year. Thomas R. Peck & Co. had, on Mystic avenue, a factory for making fur (commonly called beaver) hats, of which the product some years had been about ten thousand, valued at about $40,000. But soon after the time of which we write, that department of industry was entirely ruined by the growing popularity and sale of
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14., Some Medford farmers who had milk routes in Boston in the Thirties and forties. (search)
bout fifteen years old. Up in the morning at 3 A. M., the cows milked and got ready to move, I carried the morning's and the previous night's milk, collecting some on the road at E. T. Hastings' and Joseph Swan's, delivered some in Medford and Charlestown and the North and West Ends, also in the vicinity of Fort Hill (about fifty gallons). In the afternoon I drove to Woburn to collect more milk. In Boston Peter C. Brooks was a customer, and numbers of other Medford families, including Robert Bacon's, and Miss Lucy Osgood's brother David. Considerable truck went over the road both ways for them; for instance, swill for Miss Lucy's pig. A Mr. Lovering, cattle drover and dealer, used to drive a herd of cows into the country at certain times and return them later. I recollect seeing Everett Wellington driving some of his father's stock through Lexington at one time, probably to pasture. There were many working oxen, and one large slaughter-house and tannery where the Armory now st
he original (one hundred and thirty-eight) members who subscribed before the organization of the society, March 17, 1829, that the name of Samuel Train of this town is found. During the first fifty years of the society's life the following citizens enrolled in the membership:— 1829Dr. Samuel Swan. 1829George Thompson. 1830Dudley Hall. 1830John King. 1831Capt. Martin Burridge. 1834Nathaniel H. Bishop. 1845Edmund T. Hastings, Jr. 1845Nathaniel Whiting. 1847John H. Bacon. 1847Robert Bacon. 1850George E. Adams. 1851Charles Hall. 1855S. B. Perry. 1859George L. Stearns. 1860James Bean. 1863Peter C. Hall. 1864Caroline B. Chase (Mrs.) 1864David W. Lothrop. 1865Francis Brooks. 1865;Joshua T. Foster. 1865J. Q, A. Griffin. 1865William B. Whitcomb. 1865Ellen M. Gill (Mrs.) 1866Mrs. Samuel Joyce. 1866Edward Kakas. 1866Francis Thieler. 1867S. R. Roberts. 1868Dr. H. H. Pillsbury. 1869William C. Child. 1869James W. Tufts. 1870Japhet Sherman. 1871George S. Buss. 1<