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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 3 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Part taken by the Ninth Virginia cavalry in Repelling the Dahlgren raid. (search)
ed twelve of his men, and crossing the Mattaponi, took position on the south bank at Dunkirk to dispute their passage over the bridge. After waiting some time, he learned the enemy had found a boat and crossed at Aylett's, two miles lower down. He immediately pursued them, and availing himself of his perfect familiarity with the country, succeeded before nightfall in getting in front of them. On reaching the road of the enemy's march, he met a homeguard company, under command of Captain Richard Hugh Bagby, with several lieutenants and some privates from other regular regiments, ready to dispute the advance of the enemy. Falling back until a good position was reached, the men were posted and darkness closed in. No advance after dark was expected. A lieutenant was left in command on the road. About 11 o'clock the tramp of horses was heard. When within twenty or thirty paces the officer commanded Halt! The reply was Disperse, you damned Rebels, or I shall charge you. Fire! order
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
nt in we found the large bomb-proof filled with devout worshippers, and it proved one of the most tender, precious meetings I ever attended. If I mistake not Rev. John W. Ryland (then orderly sergeant of the King and Queen Company) led the singing, and they sang, with tender pathos which touched every heart, some of those old songs which dear old Uncle Sam Ryland used to sing, and which were fragrant with hallowed memories of Bruington. (I wonder if Uncle Sam is not now singing, with Richard Hugh Bagby and other loved ones, some of those same old songs, for surely they were sweet enough for even the heavenly choir.) I might write columns about those services in the trenches, but I can find space now for only one other incident. In the summer of 1864 I preached a good deal in Wright's Georgia Brigade, where we had a precious revival, and a large number of professions of conversion. The brigade was stationed at a point where the opposing lines were some distance apart, and I used
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
ns for the statement that a very large proportion of our evangelical preachers, under sixty and over thirty-five, at the South, learned in the army to endure hardness as good soldiers of Jesus Christ. And certainly a very large proportion of our most efficient church-members within the past twenty years have been those who found Christ in the camp, or had the pure gold of their Christian character refined and purified by the fiery trials through which they were called to pass. Rev. Dr. Richard Hugh Bagby, of Bruington, Virginia, told me that of twenty-seven members of his Church, who returned at the close of the war, all save two came back more earnest Christians and more efficient churchmembers than they had ever been, and many other pastors have borne similar testimony. A recent letter from a gallant soldier and active Christian worker in the noble little State of South Carolina tells me of the two most active and useful laymen in his section, who found Christ in the camp, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 11 (search)
s received to take the road to old Fort Jesup, and join Colonel Bagby's regiment of Texas cavalry on outpost duty, leaving ths front. It was naturally inferred that they stood between Bagby and Debray. The regiment was deployed, skirmishers being ainst us. At this time three firings were distinctly heard: Bagby's, the enemy's and Debray's. After a short time, Bagby's fiBagby's firing was no longer heard, and the enemy's efforts seemed to be more intensely directed against us. At this juncture, Lieutenant-Colonel Hoffmann, of Bagby's regiment, and Captain Corwin, of the staff of Green's brigade, came by a circuitous pathway to inform Debray that Bagby, having exhausted his ammunition, was compelled to fall back; that the opposing force was a divisilor's infantry fell back on Mansfield, leaving Debray's and Bagby's Texas regiments, and Vincent's regiment of Louisiana cava, who was in command, assigned the right of our line to General Bagby; the center to General Major, and the left to General D
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid against Richmond. (search)
d for Hon. A. H. Stephens by the late Rev. R. H. Bagby, D. D., who stood within a few feet of Colon Forty-Second Virginia battalion, seventy; Captain Bagby, Home Guards, twenty-five; Captain Todd, H the Courthouse, having sent a dispatch to Captain Bagby, of the Home Guards, to keep me advised ofSecond Virginia battalion, was present and Captain Bagby, Home Guard. I immediately took command opresent. They were afterwards captured by Captain Bagby. I cannot say by whom the place of ambushe statement of Mr. Halbach that of Rev. Richard Hugh Bagby, D. D., who commanded the Home Guard on ters were correct copies of the originals. Dr. Bagby wrote out his statement for Hon. A. H. Steph we have not yet been able to recover it. Dr. Bagby also promised to write out his narrative andine, and not forgeries. But, alas! Dr. Richard Hugh Bagby—one of the truest, bravest, purest, nor by Littlepage to Halbach, and were read by Dr. Bagby and others before there was any opportunity
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Several incidents of Christ in the camp. (search)
in we found the large bomb proof filled with devout worshippers, and it proved one of the most tender, precious meetings I ever attended. If I mistake not, Rev. John W. Ryland (then orderly sergeant of the King and Queen company) led the singing, and they sang, with tender pathos that touched every heart, some of those old songs which dear old Uncle Sam. Ryland used to sing, and which were fragrant with hallowed memories of Bruington. [I wonder if Uncle Sam. is not now singing, with Richard Hugh Bagby and other loved ones, some of those same old songs, for surely they were sweet enough for even the heavenly choir.] I might write columns about those services in the trenches, but I can find space now for only one other incident. In the summer of 1864 I preached a good deal in Wright's Georgia brigade where we had a precious revival, and a large number of professions of conversion. The brigade was stationed at a point where the opposing lines were some distance apart, and I used t