hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 17 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 18 results in 8 document sections:

The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
asant Hill, where another battle was fought on the 9th, and the enemy repulsed with great loss. During the night General Banks continued his retrograde movement to Grand Ecore, and thence to Alexandria, which he reached on the 27th of April. Here a serious difficulty arose in getting Admiral Porter's fleet, which accompanied the expedition, over the rapids, the water having fallen so much since they passed up as to prevent their return. At the suggestion of Colonel (now Brigadier-General) Bailey, and under his superintendence, wing-dams were constructed, by which the channel was contracted so that the fleet passed down the rapids in safety. The army evacuated Alexandria on the 14th of May, after considerable skirmishing with the enemy's advance, and reached Morganza and Point Coupde near the end of the month. The disastrous termination of this expedition, and the lateness of the season, rendered impracticable the carrying out of my plans of a movement in force sufficient to ins
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
Seventy-first Ohio Infantry, of operations August 9-September 8. No. 67Lieut. Col. Daniel Bowman, Ninety-third Ohio Infantry. No. 68Col. Oliver H. Payne, One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio Infantry, including operations of Ninety-third Ohio Infantry, May 6-August 19. No. 69Col. Frederick Knefler, Seventy-ninth Indiana Infantry, commanding Third Brigade. No. 70Capt. Eli F. Ritter, Seventy-ninth Indiana Infantry. No. 71Col. George F. Dick, Eighty-sixth Indiana Infantry. No. 72Lieut. Col. Chesley D. Bailey, Ninth Kentucky Infantry, of operations May 3-June 26. No. 73Col. George H. Cram, Ninth Kentucky Infantry, of operations June 26-September 8. No. 74Col. Alexander M. Stout, Seventeenth Kentucky Infantry. No. 75Maj. Joseph T. Snider, Thirteenth Ohio Infantry. No. 76Lieut. Col. Henry G. Stratton, Nineteenth Ohio Infantry. No. 77Capt. Robert H. Higgins, Fifty-ninth Ohio Infantry. No. 78Capt. Lyman Bridges, Illinois Light Artillery, commanding Artillery Brigade, Fourth Army Cor
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
ugh to hold nearly as long a line as ourselves, and from our observations Kimball's left brigade was about opposite the rebel flank. As night had fallen at this time, the troops were ordered to intrench and remain in the position gained. The Twenty-third Corps came in sight behind our right flank during the engagement, but gave no support to our movement. The loss in Knefler's brigade was quite severe, including the dangerously wounding of Colonel Manderson, Nineteenth Ohio, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, Ninth Kentucky, and the killing of Captain Miller, assistant adjutant-general of the brigade. We remained in our position confronting the enemy until the night of the 5th, when the troops were withdrawn, falling back to Jonesborough. Remained in bivouac at Jonesborough the 6th. On the 7th fell back to the vicinity of Rough and Ready, and on the 8th marched to our present camp east of Atlanta. In concluding this report I take pleasure in recommending to the favorable cons
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
ched itself in advance of the captured line of the enemy's works, and held this position till the final withdrawal of the army. The brigade suffered quite severely in the assault, especially in the loss of some valuable officers. Captain Miller, assistant adjutant-general of the brigade, was killed instantly. He was a most gallant, intelligent, and useful officer. His untimely death is mourned by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. Colonel Manderson, Nineteenth Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, Ninth Kentucky; Captain Colclazer, Seventy-ninth Indiana, and other valuable officers, were wounded in the assault. I remained on the field till I had seen my division securely posted, and finally reached my headquarters about 8 p. m. The following morning the commanding general of the grand Military Division of the Mississippi announced the campaign terminated. But my division maintained its position in close proximity to the enemy, daily losing some men in the picket encounter
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Oyler; Ninth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Chesley D. Bailey; Seventeenth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, Col. Alexander M. Stout; Thirteenth Regimg of special mention are Col. Charles F. Manderson, of the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers; Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, of the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers; Maj. George W. Parker, of the Seventy-ninth Indianacommand of his regiment, the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers, up to this time commanded by Lieut. Col. Chesley D. Bailey. Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Oyler, of the Seventyninth Indiana Volunteers, relinquished cseverely wounded. Col. Charles F. Manderson, of the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers, and Lieut. Col. Chesley D. Bailey, of the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers, who were leading the charge most gallantly, were ot say too much of him or of Colonel Manderson, of the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, of the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers, who were severely wounded, who are always conspicuo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 76 (search)
No. 72. report of Lieut. Col. Chesley D. Bailey, Ninth Kentucky Infantry, of operations May 3-June 26. Atlanta, Ga., September 13, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following as my official report of the part taken by the Ninth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers in the recent campaign during the time I was in command, viz, from the beginning of the campaign until the 26th day of June, 1864, at which time I was succeeded by Colonel Cram: Left McDonald's Station on the 3d of May and reached Catoosa Springs, Ga., on the evening of the 4th, where we lay until the morning of the 7th, when we moved out on the Tunnel Hill road. The advance was attended with some skirmishing and occasional artillery firing. Reached Tunnel Hill at 2 p. m., from the top of which the enemy could be plainly seen occupying Rocky Face Ridge, little more than a mile distant. Lay on the hill until the next morning, the 8th, when we advanced toward the ridge, making a demonstration to detract
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 77 (search)
threw up a barricade of rails. The enemy occupied a skirt of woods on the left bank, apparently in some force. In several places their works could be seen distinctly. I reported to Colonel Knefler and was ordered to hold the position. Our skirmishers were briskly engaged with those of the enemy for several hours, when I received orders to cross the creek at the point where the Seventy-ninth Indiana lay, with the Seventy-ninth Indiana and Ninth Kentucky. I accordingly directed Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, of the Ninth Kentucky, to move into position on the left of the Seventyninth Indiana. Fifty skirmishers were thrown out from each regiment, under command of Major Parker, Seventy-ninth Indiana. The brigade corps of pioneers, under command of Major Gemmer, succeeded in throwing a bridge across the creek at two points, about 100 yards apart. The crossing of the creek was effected under fire of the enemy's skirmishers, with but little loss. The space between the creek and the ene
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ol. Nicholas L. Anderson; 41st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Robert L. Kimberly; 71st Ohio, Joined August 31st. Col. Henry K. McConnell; 93d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Daniel Bowman; 124th Ohio, Col. Oliver H. Payne, Lieut.-Col. James Pickands, Col. Oliver H. Payne. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel Beatty, Col. Frederick Knefier: 79th Ind., Col. Frederick Knefier, Lieut.-Col. Samuel P. Oyler, Maj. George W. Parker, Capt. John G. Dunbar, Capt. Eli F. Ritter; 86th Ind., Col. George F. Dick; 9th Ky., Lieut.-Col. Chesley D. Bailey, Col. George H. Cram; 17th Ky., Col. Alexander M. Stout; 13th Ohio, Col. Dwight Jarvis, Jr., Maj. Joseph P. Snider; 19th Ohio, Col. Charles F. Manderson, Lieut.-Col. Henry G. Stratton; 59th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Granville A. Frambes, Capt. Charles A. Sheafe, Capt. John L. Watson, Capt. Robert H. Higgins. Artillery, Capt. Cullen Bradley: Ill. Battery, Capt. Lyman Bridges, Chief of corps artillery from May 23d. Lieut. Morris D. Temple, Lieut. Lyman A. White; 6th Ohio, Lieut. Oliver