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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
ising money more rapidly. Russell had become acquainted with Goddard Bailey, a South Carolinian and kinsman of Floyd, who was the clerk in y were the State bonds composing the Indian Trust-Fund. He induced Bailey to exchange these bonds July, 1860. for Floyd's illegal acceptanceciated, and the holders called on Russell for additional security. Bailey supplied him with more bonds, December 13. until the whole amount the coupons payable on the 1st of January, on the abstracted bonds, Bailey found himself in such a position that he was driven to a confessionconspiracy, as Commissioner of the Sovereign State of Mississippi. Bailey wrote a letter to him, antedated the 1st of December, disclosing thd the exact amount of the theft was speedily made known. At length Bailey was discovered, and made a full confession. The wildest stories the public held Floyd and Thompson responsible for the crime which Bailey had confessed. The blow given to the public credit was a staggerin
The Daily Dispatch: January 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], To James M. Estes, Wm. M. Caldwell, and others. (search)
From Washington. Washington Jan. 25. --It is currently reported here that Goddard Bailey has been presented to the Grand-Jury, for the larceny of the Indian Trust Fund, and that Ex-Secretary Floyd, and Russell and Bailey have been presented for a conspiracy to defraud the Government in the same. The House Committee on Military Affairs has prepared a bill for the benefit of the troops at Fort Sumter, appropriating $1,150 to indemnify them for the clothing, furniture, musical instru --It is currently reported here that Goddard Bailey has been presented to the Grand-Jury, for the larceny of the Indian Trust Fund, and that Ex-Secretary Floyd, and Russell and Bailey have been presented for a conspiracy to defraud the Government in the same. The House Committee on Military Affairs has prepared a bill for the benefit of the troops at Fort Sumter, appropriating $1,150 to indemnify them for the clothing, furniture, musical instruments, &c., lost in leaving Fort Moultrie.
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1861., [Electronic resource], Decision against the Government in the case of the Indian trust bonds, (search)
Decision against the Government in the case of the Indian trust bonds, --In the United States District Court for the Southern district of New York, on Saturday last, Judge Smalley delivered an oral opinion in the case of the United States against Goddard Bailey, and the Bank of the Republic and others.--The Government in this case sought to compel the defendants to deliver such of the stolen bonds as they might have in their possession. The parties who were thus proceeded against was the Bank of the Republic; Clark, Dodge & Co.; Thompson Brothers, and Richard Schell. The Judge decided that the bonds in question were negotiable, and were negotiated in the regular course of business. All parties who had received them in good faith, and without notice of their abstraction, were bona fide holders, and could not be called upon to deliver them up except in due course of redemption. The temporary injunctions obtained by the Government were therefore all vacated.
n in Washington: A day or two since, Goddard Bailey, the law clerk of the Interior Department-. It proved to be a voluntary confession from Bailey that at the instance of another he had abstracecretary then entrusted them to the keeping of Bailey, the department's law clerk, who was under bonreat commotion in the department, and he, with Bailey and other clerks, were there engaged in the cocers, &c., plying over the city. According to Bailey's confession, he loaned the bonds to the partyaid to have so far found all the statements of Bailey's letter of confession correct to the letter. d not to be the only person implicated besides Bailey. A Washington banker, and others, whose namesharers in the contemplated profits of it. Bailey had three millions of dollars in such bonds inGovernment may not ultimately be a loser. Bailey was appointed to office on perhaps the strongerequenter of the faro banks. This morning Bailey went over to the jail in company with his coun[4 more...]
e rather than abandon the odious principles of their party. [And, thank God! it cannot congeal the fiery Southern heart.] With regard to the transactions of Goddard Bailey. I can give you nothing in addition to what reached you last night by telegraph. I am told that nobody is to blame, neither Bailey nor the Secretary of War.Bailey nor the Secretary of War. At least no criminal action can lie against them. Bailey is out on bail. I saw him last night at the National Hotel. He noticed no one; but his face, I thought, showed that a great burden had been lifted from his mind and heart. There is too much reason to fear that when the investigation ordered yesterday by the House is haBailey is out on bail. I saw him last night at the National Hotel. He noticed no one; but his face, I thought, showed that a great burden had been lifted from his mind and heart. There is too much reason to fear that when the investigation ordered yesterday by the House is had, the disgrace will fall mainly upon Virginia. Some time ago, I wrote that Forney was begging for conciliation for compromise.--Hear how he talks now: "I have for weeks past counselled peace. But the day for persuasion has passed and gone. The time has come for action! action!! action!!! The city of Philadelphia, wh
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1860., [Electronic resource], A Mayor getting his election expenses out of gamblers and Houses of Ill Fame. (search)
on the basis of the reestablishment of the Missouri Compromise line to the Pacific. If successful, they will then invite the Northern members to join them. Bailey, the defaulting clerk, has been surrendered by his sureties, and is now in jail. The South Carolina Commissioners have arrived. Russell has been placed in jail here for complicity with Bailey. His security was put at $500,000, and his counsel intend to apply for a habeas corpus on the ground of excessive bail. The missing bonds are $370,000 of Mo. 6's, $357,000 of N. C. 6's, and $144,000 Tenn, 6's — all coupons. The investigation shows that the contract with Russell, Majors & emoranda, stating that so much money would be due on the execution of certain services, which Russell had used from time to time as collaterals in raising money.--Bailey in his letter to Secretary Thompson, said no official had any complicity in the transaction, or knowledge of the fact of the extraction of the bonds. In Russ