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Ford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The Reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under the command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V.-General Bragg will detach the Fifty-first and Fifty-second Regiments, Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama, and Desha's Arkansas Battalions, and Bain's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI.-Strong guards will be left at the railroad-bridges between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportions from the commands at Iuka, Burnsville, and Corinth. VII.-Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field; corps commanders will determine the strength of these guards.
f two rifled 6-pounders, brass placed upon our extreme right, next the railroad, manned by a detachment of the Washington Artillery, of New Orleans; one smooth 12-pounder siege gun, mounted to the right of the Farmington road, and manned by Captain Rice's company, as is also the 24-pounder siege gun, smooth, placed on the left of the same road. Next to this comes a 24-pounder siege gun, rifled, which commands the Farmington road for nearly three-quarters of a mile. This gun is manned by Captain Bain's company of light artillery. The next gun, which is about 300 or 400 yards farther to the left, is a brass 12-pounder rifled, and is so placed as to get a raking fire up the Monterey road and a cross-fire upon all the cleared ground in front of the breastworks. This gun is manned by Captain Jones' company of heavy artillery. Next on the left is a rifled 24-pounder siege gun, which sweeps the Monterey road. This also is manned by Captain Jones' company. The next gun is a smooth 24-
ed, will dismount from suitable horses as many troops, with the least prejudice practicable to his arm of the service, as may be necessary to supply said deficiency. 5th. All men thus dismounted will be paid the assessed value of their horses without delay, and they will be attached to regiments of infantry of their own selection, ten days being given for selection. 6th. Supernumeraries, if any, of light batteries, after organization as prescribed in these orders, may select whether to serve in other light batteries or to serve with siege guns or guns in position, it being understood that all such supernumeraries in the event of a battle shall be held in reserve to replace casualties in light batteries in action. 7th. Vaiden (Bain's) artillery company will report at once to General Bragg to be assigned according to the needs of the service, their guns to be turned in to the Ordnance Department. By command of General Beauregard: Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General.
ly during the remainder of the day, and speaks highly of all under his command. That evening he was ordered to Norfolk for repairs. The Beaufort, Lieutenant Commanding Parker, was in close contact with the enemy frequently during the day, and all on board behaved gallantly. Lieutenant Commanding Parker expresses his warmest thanks to his officers and men for their coolness. Acting Midshipman Foreman, who accompanied him as volunteer aid, Midshipman Mallory and Newton, captain's clerk, Bain, and Mr. Gray, pilot, are all specially mentioned by him. On the twenty-first instant, I forwarded to the department correct lists of the casualties on board all the vessels of the squadron, on the eighth; none, it appears, occurred on the ninth. While in the act of closing this report, I received the communication of the department, dated twenty-second instant, relieving me temporarily of the command of the squadron for the naval defences of James River. I feel honored in being reliev
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Hampton roads--Confederate official reports. (search)
lantly during the remainder of the day, and speaks highly of all under his command. That evening he was ordered to Norfolk for repairs. The Beaufort, Lieutenant-Commanding Parker, was in close contact with the enemy frequently during the day, and all on board behaved gallantly. Lieutenant-Commanding Parker expresses his warmest thanks to his officers and men for their coolness. Acting Midshipman Foreman, who accompanied him as volunteer aid, Midshipmen Mallory and Newton, Captain's Clerk Bain, and Mr. Gray, pilot, are all specially mentioned by him. On the 21st instant, I forwarded to the Department correct lists of the casualties on board all the vessels of the squadron, on the 8th; none, it appears, occurred on the 9th. While in the act of closing this report, I received the communication of the Department, dated 22d instant, relieving me temporarily of the command of the squadron for the naval defences of James river. I feel honored in being relieved by the gallant Fl
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: Fleshing the sword. (search)
abinet, and the successful attack, on a Missouri force, by a party of Free State men, led by Captain Snyder, the blacksmith, whose name is inseparably associated with the history of the massacre of the Marais-des-Cygnes. This cabin was the Headquarters of these ruffians. When they saw the Free State men coming they offered fight; a conflict ensued; they refused to surrender; the cabin was fired, and four of the murderers perished in its flames. At this time John Brown and his men were at Bain's cabin, in Bourbon County, preparing for any emergency that might demand their aid. Two hundred Missourians had assembled at Fail's store, eight miles distant, in Missouri, for the purpose of invading the Territory; but, hearing that Old Brown was recruiting his forces to attack them, they withdrew fifteen miles farther from the borders. While John Brown was stating his plan of following them, and, by invading Missouri and carrying off slaves, teaching the citizens of that State to attend
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Exodus. (search)
d asked: Hows ye feel, fadder, when you's free? These incidents were related by Kagi. These liberated slaves constituted four families: one man, his wife, and two children; a widowed mother, two daughters, and a son; a young man, a boy, and a woman who had been separated from her husband. They were taken by one party several miles into Kansas, and there they remained for two or three weeks. A fight or two. Captain Brown and Kagi returned to their fortified position — known as Bain's Fort — on the Little Osage, in which fifty men could have resisted five hundred. When the news of the invasion of Missouri spread, a wild panic went with it, which, in a few days, resulted in clearing Bates and Vernon Counties of their slaves. Large numbers were sold south; many ran into the Territory and escaped; the others were removed farther inland. When John Brown made his invasion there were five hundred slaves in that district where there are not fifty negroes now. For a short t
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 17: with Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley (continued). Cedar Creek (search)
sed himself up and attempted to unbuckle his body belt, but we did it for him. Doctor Slocum said he had the greatest nerve of any man he ever saw, and if he had been in a hospital where he could have had extra good care, he believed he would have recovered. But he was so terribly wounded that he died several days later. The noble fellow had lived through all the battles of the regiment and had borne the colors to the front on every field, ever since he had taken them from the hand of Sergeant Bain at Salem Church. No better soldier ever lived. The enemy along the stone wall kept up a severe fire, and a good many were hit here, and John Rowland of Company D was instantly killed by a solid cannon ball. One of those hit was Swartout, of Company F, through the shoulder. He used to be our fortune teller. His predictions were all good whether they came true or not. After remaining, it seemed to me an age, we were ordered to charge and drive the enemy from his position. It looked l
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
general temperament of the man than from any personal interest. Then I went into a Cooperative meeting for a while—working men, who all dropped their H's, but spoke much to the point . . . . Later, I walked through Pall Mall, all illuminated for the Queen's birthday, and crowded with people . . . . I saw one fight and stopped it to the displeasure of the crowd so I decided not to interfere any more . . . . I saw Herbert Spencer. He was playing billiards as he does every afternoon. Prof. Bain introduced me and he went back to his game, apologizing, but afterwards came to me in the library and we had some talk. I liked him better than I had been told I should. He looks like his pictures and like a Unitarian minister. He is rather small, with large head, bald forehead and spectacles, bad figure and walks awkwardly, manner quite pleasant and cordial with a little that effect of whim and isolation more common with Englishmen than with us. He said billiards were of great value to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
ter, July 30, 1864. [from the Richmond, Va., News leader, November 24, 1908.] Roster of the members of the 12th Virginia Infantry, Mahone's Brigade, who were engaged. Field and staff officers. Weisiger, Colonel David A., commanding brigade; wounded. Jones, Captain Richard W., of Company I, commanding regiment. Hinton, Lieutenant Drury A., Aide-de-Camp of brigade commander. Smith, Adjutant Hugh R. Maclin, Sergeant-Major Joseph J. Company a —Petersburg city guard. Bain, Sergeant John W. Eckles, Private Benjamin F.; wounded. Hawthorne, Private John W. Harrison, Private William Henry. Ivey, Private George W. May, Private George W. Stainback, Private Francis Charles. Company B —Petersburg A Grays. Brown, Private Samuel E. Chappell, Private Robert; wounded. Cayce, Private Milton; wounded. Chase, Private Henry E.; wounded. Dean, Private Leonidas H.; killed. Fowlkes, Private Joseph C.; wounded. Leavitt, Private Ithman
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