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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 2 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 3 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 30, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
from the right of Upton's Division to Macon, and in scouting the country to his front and rear. General Minty, commanding the Second Division, with the main body well in hand, also near Macon, was scouting the country to the southeast, watching the lower crossings of the Ocmulgee, and had small parties at all the important points on the Southwestern Railroad, and in Western and Southwestern Georgia. Detachments of the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry occupied Cuthbert, Eufaula, Columbus and Bainbridge, and kept a vigilant watch over the lower Flint and Chattahoochee, while General McCook, with a detachment of his division at Albany, and seven hundred men between there and Tallahassee, Florida, was scouting the country to the north and eastward. We also had rail and telegraphic communication from my headquarters at Macon with Atlanta, Augusta, West Point, Milledgeville, Albany and Eufaula, and, finally, Palmer, in hot haste, was approaching the line of the Savannah from South Carolina w
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
tc. They are, however, all dry now. Major Thomas traveled with me from Fort Mason. We are in camp together. Captain Bradford, whom we knew at Old Point, is on the court. Colonel Chapman, of the infantry, from Georgetown, Captain Marsey, Colonels Bainbridge, Bumford, Ruggles, and Seawell, and Captain Sibley, an old classmate of mine. Colonel Waite is president of the court and Captain Samuel Jones, of the artillery, judge advocate. The latter brought his wife and child with him in a six-mulk and made all my blankets necessary. This morning fires and overcoats are in fashion again. A general courtmartial has been convened here for the trial of Lieutenant Eagle, Second Cavalry. I am president of the court, I am sorry to say. Colonel Bainbridge, Major Thomas, Major Van Horn, Major Paul, Captain King, and others are members. I have pitched a couple of tents by the side of mine for the Major and Mrs. Thomas, for she has accompanied him again, and they are to take their meals with m
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 18: the Capital secured.--Maryland secessionists Subdued.--contributions by the people. (search)
nt. The arrival of the Massachusetts troops was just in time to save the Constitution. Communication was speedily opened between General Butler and Captain Blake, and a hundred of the troops, who were seamen at home, with the Salem Zouaves as a guard, were detailed to assist in getting the Constitution from the wharf, and putting her out beyond the bar in a place of safety. With the help of the Maryland, acting as a tug, this was accomplished. That venerable vessel, in which Hull, and Bainbridge, and Stewart had won immortal honors in the Second War for Independence, was built in Boston, and was first manned by Massachusetts men; now she was preserved to the uses of the Government, for whose sovereignty she had gallantly fought, by the hands of Massachusetts men. This, said General Butler, in an order thanking the troops for the service, is a sufficient triumph of right; a sufficient triumph for us. By this the blood of our friends, shed by the Baltimore mob, is so far avenged. W
uard, to march leisurely, and arrived at Bainbridge, on the 25th of December. A pontoon bridge was constructed as rapidly as the boats arrived, the corps were placed in position covering the roads to the north, and during the 26th and 27th the Army crossed the river. The following day, the march was continued in the direction of Tupelo, at which place Cheatham's Corps, the last in the line of march, went into camp on the loth of January, 1865. I had telegraphed General Beauregard from Bainbridge to meet me, and, in compliance with my request, he arrived at Army headquarters on the night of the 14th. The day previous, I had sent the following dispatch to the Secretary of War: headquarters, Tupelo, Mississippi, January 13th, 1865. Honorable J. A. Seddon, Secretary of War, Richmond. I request to be relieved from the command of this Army. J. B. Hood, General. On the 15th, after consultation with General Beauregard, a system of furloughing the troops was agreed upon. In
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
ogically flows therefrom, in natural sequence, that the Confederate States can have no claim upon the negro soldiers captured by them from the armies of the United States, because of the former owner-ship of them by their citizens or subjects, and only claim such as result, under the laws of war, from their captor merely. Do the Confederate authorities claim the right to reduce to a state of slavery freemen, prisoners of war captured by them? This claim our fathers fought against under Bainbridge and Decatur, when set up by the Barbary powers on the northern shore of Africa about the year 1800, and in 1864 their children will hardly yield it upon their own soil! This point I will not pursue further, because I understood you to repudiate the idea that you will reduce free men to slaves because of capture in war, and that you base the claim of the Confederate authorities to re-enslave our negro soldiers, when captured by you, upon the jus post limini, or that principle of the law
with the rebel cavalry near East-Point. October 26.--At seven A. M., I left Atlanta, in command of a foraging expedition composed as follows: The Third brigade of my division, under Lieutenant-Colonel Van Voorhes, nine hundred and forty-five men; Third brigade, First division, under Colonel Robinson, one thousand two hundred men; Second brigade, Third division, under Major Brant, six hundred and forty-two men; cavalry, under Colonel Garrard, four hundred men; two batteries under Captain Bainbridge; six hundred and seventy-two wagons from the different commands and detachments in and around Atlanta. Reached Decatur at one P. M. Learning here that the enemy had concentrated a force from two to four thousand strong, between Stone Mountain and Lawrenceville, I sent a request to Major-General Slocum, for a force to be sent to Stone Mountain, with the object of preventing annoyance on my right flank. This request was responded to by sending my Second brigade, under Colonel Mindil.
, the batteries were reduced from six to four guns each, leaving but (24) twenty-four guns in the brigade instead of (36) thirty-six. This was, however, increased to (28) twenty-eight, by the assignment of battery K, Fifth U. S. artillery, Captain Bainbridge, with (4) four (20) twenty-pounder Parrott guns, to the corps. During the occupation, several expeditions were sent out in the country for forage, a battery accompanying each; but meeting with but slight opposition, they were at neither g so reduced as to render them utterly unserviceable. Almost an entire new supply of horses had to be obtained. A short time before leaving Atlanta, a still further reduction of the artillery was made. Battery K, Fifth U. S. artillery, Captain Bainbridge; battery I, First Michigan artillery, Captain Smith and Thirteenth New-York independent battery, Captain Bundy, were relieved from duty with the corps and sent to Chattanooga, leaving but four batteries, (2) two twelve pounders and (2) two
her casemate on our approach, now lay draggled and torn, with its shattered flag-staff, on her deck ; and turning our vessel around with hard-a-port helm, which she answered slowly but steadily, we again passed down by our enemy. Our divisions still stood at their guns, and our brave commander firmly enunciating his instructions and orders, and guiding every movement of his gallant ship with a coolness, precision, and relentless audacity that find no parallel since the days of Decatur and Bainbridge — those days of splendid gallantry and magnificent courage — calmly smoking his cigar through the whole eventful conflict, and displaying a perfect indifference to danger, worthy of one of Farragut's salamanders, kept his guns at work on our retiring foe, so long as they could be brought to bear, till the Sassacus was carried by her disabled engine slowly, gracefully, and defiantly out of range. Thus ended the single-handed encounter between the Sassacus — a delicate river steamer — an
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Preface (search)
ses the finest qualities of any ship I ever sailed in; rolls as easy as a cradle, and stands up under her canvas like a church. Lying under her stern is the captain's gig; her other boats seem to have been called away; probably one of the watches has gone ashore. Few annals in the history of the United States are of greater and more compelling interest than those connected with the achievement of its sailors. The descendants of Drake and Frobisher, led by John Paul Jones, Perry, Bainbridge, Porter, and other illustrious naval heroes in the days of lofty spars and topsails, made a name for themselves both on the sea and on the lasting scrolls of history. Their records, penned by historians and novelists, form brilliant pages in American literature. Therefore, it was not strange that a conflict in which officers and seamen of the same race and speech, graduates of the same historic Naval Academy and sailing the same seas and along the same shores, met in heroic struggle, sho
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
-inch pivot-gun of the sloop-of-war Wissahickon gives us an idea of the appearance of the men of the old navy. The face of the gun-captain standing near the breach of his gun shows that he is a sailor through and through. There are very few landsmen pictured here. The old Jack-tar, standing fourth in the right row, who has turned his cap into a ditty bag, harks back to the fighting days when steam had hardly been thought of. He is a survivor of the War of 1812, and remembers the days of Bainbridge, of Decatur, Stewart, and Biddle. Even the younger men have no look of the volunteer about them; they are deep-sea sailors, every one. The Wissahickon was one of the Federal cruisers that had put out in search of the Confederate commerce-destroyers. She was in the fleet of Admiral Farragut at New Orleans and ran the batteries at Vicksburg. Late in 1862 she was in Carolina waters and in January, 1863, participated in the first attacks on Fort McAllister. She was in Admiral Dahlgren's f
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