Your search returned 286 results in 62 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
; and after testing their strength and gaining the confidence born of experience, they generally moved to the larger cities, North or South. Is it more than necessary to mention Frick, Goodman and Smith, of Maryland; Hartshorne, Chapman, Horner, Mitchell, Mutter, and J. L. Cabell, of Virginia; Jones, Chas. Caidwell and Dickson, of North Carolina; Geddings, Bellinger, Toland, and Sam. H. Dickson, of South Carolina; Meigs, Arnold, Bedford and Anthony, of Georgia; Eve, of Tennessee; Nott and Baldwin, of Alabama; Stone and Jones, of Louisiana; Dudley, McDowell and Yandell, of Kentucky, to recall to your minds the great instructors in medicine in this country? How well they performed their part is prominently shown in the lasting impressions they have left behind them. Historic they are, and historic they will continue to be; untold generations will arise to bless them, and they will not fade into obscurity through the lapse of time. How can I speak except in terms of reverence an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee as an educator. (search)
. In his nice sense of honor, which would have felt a stain like a wound, in unselfish patriotism, in moral elevation, he was unlike many of the world's great conquerors, and finds his parallel in Washington, and in him alone. The late Colonel John B. Baldwin, highly distinguished as a lawyer and a legislator, gave me the following narrative which shows how Lee became an educator: He said Colonel Bolivar Christian, himself, and several others were talking together some time in the summer of 1865 in Staunton, Va. The subject of their conversation was what business would suit a certain ex-Confederate officer, when one of the group said, and what shall we do for General Lee? and Baldwin answered, make him president of Washington College. Colonel Christian, who was a trustee of Washington College, approved the suggestion and at the next meeting of the board of trustees, August, 1865, nominated Lee as such. He was unanimously elected, and was inaugurated as president October 2, 1865.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
ral James A. Walker, the unveiling orator, was born near Mt. Sidney, Augusta county, Virginia, August 27, 1833, and educated at the Virginia Military Institute. On leaving the Institute, where he had a difficulty with Stonewall Jackson, which led to his sending the latter a challenge, he accepted a position in the engineer corps of the Covington and Ohio railway, now the Chesapeake and Ohio, but after eighteen months of service resigned and commenced the study of law under the late Colonel John B. Baldwin. Later he took the law ticket at the University of Virginia. About the year 1855 he removed to Northern Pulaski county, Virginia. He secured a good practice, and in 1865 was elected Commonwealth's attorney of his adopted county. When the war broke out General Walker entered the Confederate army as captain of the Pulaski Guard. Subsequently he commanded the Thirteenth Virginia, and later was made a brigadier-general, and commanded the Stonewall brigade. He was desperately wound
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company a, Fifteenth Virginia Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
in the War Records Office at Washington shall have been secured, such private rolls as Captain Hazlewood has made will prove very valuable in revising and annotating them. The company was mustered into service April 23, 1861, by Inspector-General John B. Baldwin. It was recruited on Church Hill, and assigned by Colonel Baldwin to the Thirty-third Regiment of Light Infantry. The company volunteered in response to the call of Governor Letcher, for one year, at the expiration of which it eColonel Baldwin to the Thirty-third Regiment of Light Infantry. The company volunteered in response to the call of Governor Letcher, for one year, at the expiration of which it enlisted for the war. On the 24th of May, 1861, the company left for the Peninsula, as a part of the Third Virginia, commanded by Colonel Thomas P. August. After the battle of Big Bethel the regiment was known as the Fifteenth. The figures opposite the names stand for the ages of the men: Zzzcompany a, Fifteenth Virginia, C. S. A. John Wilder Atkinson, captain; 31. Served till reorganization in 1862; promoted colonel in heavy artillery. Benjamin F. Cocke, first lieutenant; 32. Resi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
64, 46th Georgia Regiment, April 30th, ‘64, 46th Georgia Regiment. Brashear, A. B., Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War, June 13, ‘63, to rank from Oct. 14, ‘62, reported to B. B. Jan. 29, ‘64. Appointment, returned to Surgeon-General. Baldwin, R. T., Assistant Surgeon to S. B. B., Sept. 30, ‘63, 43d Alabama Regiment, Oct. 31, ‘63, 43d Alabama Regiment. Brumbtell, W. H., Surgeon, Sept. 30, ‘63, 63d Virginia Regiment, Headquarters A. T., Nov. 18, ‘63. Dec. 31, ‘63, 63d Virginia Regid Tennessee Cavalry. Canfield, A. R., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary War, July 14, ‘62, to rank from same date, passed Board at Tupelo, Miss., July 14, ‘62. Dec., 35th Mississippi Regiment, January transferred from Department with Baldwin's Regiment. Chustant, A., Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank from Mar. 19, ‘62, A. and I. G. O., Richmond. Feb. 20, ‘64, ordered to report to Medical-Director, Headquarters A. T., Dalton. Mar. 1 ‘64, ordere
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
atters, and also to have graduated in 1830 at West Point, where he was a contemporary of many men who were already prominent in one or other of the two armies which were then organizing. He had been a fellow-student of Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Robert E. Lee, and of the newly-elected President of the Confederacy, Mr. Davis. Some time after this company was organized another company formed near Fairfield, and attached to the Fifty-second Virginia regiment of infantry, under Colonel John B. Baldwin, was equipped as an artillery company under Rev. John Miller, a Presbyterian minister, as captain, and this was known as the Second Rockbridge Artillery, and did good service in the war. The material of which the First Rockbridge Artillery was composed, and the military antecedents and ecclesiastical prominence of Captain Pendleton, created great enthusiasm in the company, and afterwards brought into it many young men whose engagements at the University of Virginia and other semi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
of the grave problem which confronted them. From the day of its opening session, on the 13th of February, down to the 17th of April, the advocates of secession and of union confronted each other in debate. Foremost among the Union men were John B. Baldwin, Robert Y. Conrad, Jubal A. Early, Alex. H. H. Stuart, George W. Summers, Williams C. Wickham, and the president, John Janney. Right to secede. Of the 152 members of the convention there were probably few who did not hold to the consti the State, at an election to be held on the 4th Thursday of the following May, the ratification or rejection of this momentous step. The sentiments of many of the Union men of the convention doubtless found expression in the declaration of John B. Baldwin, the great Union leader, who, when called upon to know what would be the course of the Union men in Virginia declared: We have no Union men in Virginia now, but those who were Union men will stand to their guns and make a fight that will shi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ting as captain, to command a brigade, and one Mahone to be a major-general; fighting a battle near Petersburg in company with R. E. Lee and others, and another at Five Forks, all of which things were done traitorously, unlawfully, maliciously and wickedly. The various historic acts styled crimes, in this lengthy document, were proved before the grand jury by the following witnesses summoned for the purpose: R. E. Lee, James A. Seddon, C. .B. Duffield, John Letcher, G. Wythe Munford, John B. Baldwin, Charles E. Wortham, and Thomas S. Hayward. On the finding of this indictment the trial was continued until the 2d day of May, 1868, then to the 3d day of June, and then again until the fourth Monday in November, when it was arranged that the Chief-Justice should be present. This date was again changed to the 3d of December in the same year. During this delay the fourteenth amendment to the constitution was adopted and became a part of the organic law of the land. The third sect
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
ting as captain, to command a brigade, and one Mahone to be a major-general; fighting a battle near Petersburg in company with R. E. Lee and others, and another at Five Forks, all of which things were done traitorously, unlawfully, maliciously and wickedly. The various historic acts styled crimes, in this lengthy document, were proved before the grand jury by the following witnesses summoned for the purpose: R. E. Lee, James A. Seddon, C. .B. Duffield, John Letcher, G. Wythe Munford, John B. Baldwin, Charles E. Wortham, and Thomas S. Hayward. On the finding of this indictment the trial was continued until the 2d day of May, 1868, then to the 3d day of June, and then again until the fourth Monday in November, when it was arranged that the Chief-Justice should be present. This date was again changed to the 3d of December in the same year. During this delay the fourteenth amendment to the constitution was adopted and became a part of the organic law of the land. The third sect
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Pulaski Guards. (search)
The Pulaski Guards. On the 23d of April, 1861, in the old City Hall, in Richmond, The Pulaski Guards, commanded by Captain James A. Walker, was mustered into the service of the State of Virginia by Colonel John B. Baldwin, of Staunton, inspector-general of the militia of the State. This company, which had been organized a year or more previously, was composed of sixty strong, stalwart young men, ranging in their ages principally from eighteen to thirty years, though there were several older men who had seen service in the United States army in Mexico, and with General Albert Sidney Johnston on the Western plains. Among the veterans were R. D. Gardner, first lieutenant of the company, later noted for his coolness and courage in leading his regiment as lieutenant-colonel into battle; Theophilus J. Cocke, Robert Lorton, John Owens, and David Scantlon, the company's drummer. This company, designated as Company C, constituted a part of the newly organized 4th Regiment of Vi
1 2 3 4 5 6 7