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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 286 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 219 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 218 2 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 199 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 118 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 92 2 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 91 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 84 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909 66 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 59 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Nathaniel P. Banks or search for Nathaniel P. Banks in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The removal of McClellan. (search)
The removal of McClellan. by Richard B. Irwin, Lieutenant-Colonel, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. V. In some former notes The Administration in the Peninsular campaign, Vol. II. of this work, p. 435; Washington under Banks, Vol. II. of this work, p. 541. I tried to trace with an impartial hand, and without intruding any prejudice or opinion of my own, the course of the unfortunate differences that had arisen between the Government and the commander of the Army of the Potomac. The y of the Potomac, and, eluding Pleasonton's vigorous but ineffectual pursuit, safely recrossed the river near the mouth of the Monocacy. One effect of this raid on the mind of the President is indicated in an anecdote related in Washington under Banks, Vol. II. of this work, p. 544.--R. B. I. Then, leaving the Twelfth Corps to hold Harper's Ferry, he marched down the eastern side of the Blue Ridge, as the President had originally desired, picked up the Third and Eleventh Corps and Bayard's di
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Why Burnside did not renew the attack at Fredericksburg. (search)
tter in the order mentioned has been preserved, and from it the following quotations are given: camp, near Falmouth, Va., December 10th, 1862. Dear mother--. . . . To-morrow, if our present plans are carried out, the great battle of the war will commence. . . . I have little hope of the plans succeeding. I do not think them good,--there will be a great loss of life and nothing accomplished. I am sure we are to fight against all chances of success. There is a rumor and a hope that Banks may have landed on the James River; if so, a large part of the enemy's force will be diverted from this point, but if they have a force anywhere near our own in number we are pretty certain to get whipped. The letter to Judge Kirkland was much stronger and more explicit, and evoked an answer from which one paragraph is quoted: New York, December 18th, 1862. How wonderfully prophetic is your letter, written on the 10th of December. It foretells exactly the awful disaster and rev
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 3.25 (search)
hich an army might move and artillery be used advantageously; moreover, were it left in the hands of an enemy, his batteries, established on its crest and slopes, would command the position at Chancellorsville. Everything on the whole front was ordered in. General Hooker knew that Lee was apprised of his presence on the south side of the river, and must have expected that his enemy would be at least on the lookout for an advance upon Fredericksburg. But it was of the utmost importance that Banks's Ford should fall into our hands, therefore the enemy ought to have been pressed until their strength or weakness was developed; it would then have been time enough to run away. From A photograph. Mott's Run, with a considerable brushy ravine, cuts the turnpike three fourths of a mile east of Chancellorsville. Two of Hancock's regiments, under Colonel Nelson A. Miles, subsequently the Indian fighter, were directed to occupy the ravine. Continuing my way through the woods toward C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
for the purpose of raising and organizing troops for an expedition, to be commanded by him, having for its object the capture of Vicksburg, the freeing of the Mississippi, and the opening of navigation to New Orleans. On the 9th of November General Banks was ordered to relive General Butler, at New Orleans, and proceed to open the Mississippi from below. General McClernand was authorized to show his confidential orders to the governors of the States named, but they were not communicated to G Missouri and Arkansas at this time aggregated 47,000 officers and men. Nearly eighteen thousand of these were in Arkansas under Steele. Halleck, who was still general-in-chief, ordered Steele to hold the line of the Arkansas, and to wait till Banks was ready to cooperate with him from Port Hudson in an attack upon Shreveport, and in taking possession of the Red River and its valley. Holmes, not being pressed by Steele, settled his infantry quietly at Camden, while his cavalry indulged in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
the reduction of Port Hudson. The news from Banks forced upon me a different plan of campaign fr therefore determined to move independently of Banks, cut loose from my base, destroy the rebel forg Black. On the 10th I received a letter from Banks, on the Red River, asking reenforcements. PorBrigadier-General William Dwight, afterward of Banks's staff. According to Banks, Dwight reported Banks, Dwight reported that Grant said he would give me 5000 men, but that I should not wait for them.--Ediors. came up an It had been sent by the way of New Orleans to Banks to forward to me. It ordered me to return to Gn May 23d, 1863, General Halle'ek wrote to General Banks: I assure you that the Government is e's instructions, dated November 9th, 1862, General Banks was authorized to assume control of any mi Burnside. At the same time I wrote to General Banks informing him of the fall, and sending himt was useless for him to hold out longer. General Banks gave him assurances that Vicksburg had bee[12 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
sion upon the enemy's rear, was decided upon, whereupon the commanding general (Banks) was conferred with with great frequency, until at last in the early part of Ma The comnander of the steamer came within speaking distance, reporting that General Banks's army was within five miles of the rear of the Port Hudson works. That waerating in the Teche, and which had reached Red River through the Atchafalaya. Banks was then moving against Alexandria, and a light squadron was formed to go up ane and a part of Farragut's detached squadron he steamed up to Alexandria, where Banks arrived on May 7th. After clearing out the Red River and its tributary the Black, and destroying much property, the expedition returned, Banks going to Port Hudson and Porter returning to his old station above Vicksburg. The Yazoo River now with troops in beating off the enemy at detached points. On the 25th of May Banks, who had returned with his army from Alexandria, had invested Port Hudson, whic
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.75 (search)
iling-ship Morning Light, and the schooner Velocity, was attacked by two cotton-clad steamers, and, being unable to manoeuvre, surrendered. The blockade was resumed the next day by the New London and Cayuga. After the fall of Port Hudson, General Banks took up the question of Texas. His first plan was to land at Sabine Pass and strike the railroad. The expedition was composed of troops under Franklin, and the Clifton, Sachem, Granite City, and Arizona under Lieutenant Crocker. On the 8ther the gun-boats moved up the pass to attack the enemy's fort. The Clifton ran ashore, and soon after got a shot in her boiler. The Sachem's boiler also was penetrated, and both vessels surrendered after heavy loss. The remainder retreated. Banks now decided to attack Texas near the Rio Grande, and his troops, escorted by the Monongahela and other vessels under Commander J. H. Strong, landed at Brazos November 2d. Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Aransas, and Fort Esperanza at Pass Cavallo,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 6.79 (search)
d engagement, Mouton's force was routed and pursued about four miles. Mouton then called in his other troops, burned the bridges, and evacuated the district, Buchanan's gun-boats having been prevented by a gale from arriving in time to cut off the retreat. Mouton's report accounts for 5 killed, 8 wounded, and 186 missing,--in all, 199. Among the killed was Colonel G. P. McPheeters of the Crescent regiment. Weitzel followed through Thibodeaux, and went into camp beyond the town. He claims to have taken 208 prisoners and 1 gun; his loss was 18 killed, 74 wounded, and 5 missing,--total, 97. So ended operations in Louisiana for this year. Taylor continued to occupy the Teche country, and Weitzel the La Fourche, until the spring of 1863. On the 9th of November, 1862, General N. P. Banks was assigned to the command of the Department of the Gulf to relieve General Butler. Burning of the State-House, Baton Rouge, on Sunday, December 28, 1862. from a sketch made at the time.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Port Hudson, La.: May 23d-July 8th, 1863. (search)
for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union army. Nineteenth Army Corps.--Major-General Nathaniel P. Banks. First division, Maj.-Gen. Christopher C. Augur. First Brigade, Col. Edward P. Chapin (k), Col. Charles loss: k, 15; w, 12 ; m, 4 = 31. Total Union loss: killed, 708; wounded, 3336; captured or missing, 319 = 4363. General Banks, in his official report, says that on May 27th, when h-e first assaulted the enemy's works, his effective force had b3,000, and that at the time of the surrender the besieging force was reduced to less than 10,000 men. But the returns of Banks's command for May 31st ( Official Records, Vol. XXVI., Pt. I., pp. 526-528) show not less than 30,000 officers and men oVI., Pt. I., p. 144), the loss of the garrison of Port Hudson during the siege was 176 killed, and 447 wounded = 623. General Banks reports ( Official Records, Vol. XXVI., Pt. I., p. 55), that with the post there fell into our hands over 5500 priso
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
aken in 1884. During the active operations of a campaign the post of the commander-in-chief should be in the center of his marching columns, that he may be able to give prompt and efficient aid to whichever wing may be threatened. But whenever a great battle is to be fought, the commander must be on the field to see that his orders are executed and to take advantage of the ever-changing phases of the conflict. Jackson leading a cavalry fight by night near Front Royal in the pursuit of Banks, Jackson at the head of the column following McClellan in the retreat from Richmond to Malvern Hill, presents a contrast to Bragg sending, from a distance of ten miles, four consecutive orders for an attack at daylight, which he was never to witness. Surely in the annals of warfare there is no parallel to the coolness and nonchalance with which General Crittenden marched and counter-marched for a week with a delightful unconsciousness that he was in the presence of a force of superior str
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