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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 355 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 147 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 137 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 135 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 125 13 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 108 38 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 85 7 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 84 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Banks or search for Banks in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

The shock of Banks's retreat. --An Incident occurred at the telegraph office in Washington about the time of Stonewall's advance to Winchester, which serves to illustrate the shock which Banks's retreat gave to every one, as well as the heavy losses entailed by it upon many speculative Yankees, who "calculated" upon a thrivinBanks's retreat gave to every one, as well as the heavy losses entailed by it upon many speculative Yankees, who "calculated" upon a thriving trade with Virginia. The Washington correspondent of the New York Post says: Early on Sunday morning a Northern man of business appeared at the office here and prosecuted a message for Winchester, "Call Winchester," said the clerk to the operator. Winchester was called, but made no reply. The m at the counter grew anxiound dollars worth of goods to Winchester, and it is all the property I had in the world." This was the first intimation the public had of the rout or retreat at Winchester. It was known that Banks had retreated from Strasburg, but it was supposed that it was simply a prudential movement, and that he could easily hold Winchester.