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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 30, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Fredericksburgh, Va., Dec. 25, 1863. (search)
Fredericksburgh, Va., Dec. 25, 1863. We were driving Sedgwick's infidels across Banks's Ford, when a Yankee officer was seen making his way through the streets of Fredericksburgh, where we had no troops at the time, in order to gain the opposite side of the river. A number of ladies, standing on a porch at the time, saw the runaway and cried out, Stop him! Stop him! when a Miss Philippa Barbour, a niece of Colonel Phil. Barbour, of Virginia, with a number of other ladies gave chase, and ran the Yankee officer nearly down, who, convulsed with laughter at the sport and the idea of being pursued by ladies, became nearly exhausted, and gave up on being hemmed in at the corner of a garden fence. The ladies took him prisoner and locked him up in a room until our troops again entered the city.--Mobile Tribune.
Chased by ladies. --The following paragraph, which we clip from the army letter of the Mobile Tribune, may contain some truth; but as we have before heard nothing of the affair, we cannot vouch for its accuracy: We were driving Sedgwick's infidels across Banks's ford, when a Yankee officer was seen making his way through the streets of Fredericksburg, where we had no troops at the time, in order to gain the opposite side of the river. A number of ladies standing on a porch at the time saw the runaway, and cried out "stop him, stop him," when a Miss Philippa Barbour, a niece of Col. Phil. Barbour, of Va., with a number of other ladies, gave chase, and ran the Yankee officer nearly down, who, convulsed with laughter at the sport, and the idea of being pursued by ladies, became nearly exhausted, and gave up on being hemmed in at the corner of a garden fence! The ladies took him prisoner, and locked him up in a room until our troops again entered the city.