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h and One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New-York, detachments of the Third Maryland home brigade, Ninth Vermont, (deployed as skirmishers,) and Rigby's battery, occupied the extreme left. The Twelfth New-York militia remained posted behind the first intrenchments, and a portion of Capt. Potts's battery were moved up to the Bolivar Heights and planted near the Charlestown road. Gen. White commanded the heights, Major McIlvaine all the artillery, and Gen. Miles held command over all the forces Col. Baring, acting Brigadier-General, whose forces consisted of all the infantry and artillery (Fifth New-York and Potts's battery) behind the first line of intrenchments, continued to shell the neighboring heights. About twelve o'clock, two companies of the Garibaldi Guard and two of the Sixty-fifth Ohio bravely ascended the Maryland Heights, secured some of their camp equipage, and brought down four of the pieces of artillery, which had been left spiked. This was a daring deed. On the day befor
h and One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New-York, detachments of the Third Maryland home brigade, Ninth Vermont, (deployed as skirmishers,) and Rigby's battery, occupied the extreme left. The Twelfth New-York militia remained posted behind the first intrenchments, and a portion of Capt. Potts's battery were moved up to the Bolivar Heights and planted near the Charlestown road. Gen. White commanded the heights, Major McIlvaine all the artillery, and Gen. Miles held command over all the forces Col. Baring, acting Brigadier-General, whose forces consisted of all the infantry and artillery (Fifth New-York and Potts's battery) behind the first line of intrenchments, continued to shell the neighboring heights. About twelve o'clock, two companies of the Garibaldi Guard and two of the Sixty-fifth Ohio bravely ascended the Maryland Heights, secured some of their camp equipage, and brought down four of the pieces of artillery, which had been left spiked. This was a daring deed. On the day befor
upon a country with which Great Britain was at peace. Referring to the Alabama, as she was when she left the Mersey, Mr. Laird said: If a ship without guns and without arms is a dangerous article, surely rifled guns and ammunition of all sorts are equally and even more dangerous. I have referred to the bills of entry in the custom-houses of London and Liverpool, and I find that there has been vast shipments of implements of war to the Northern States through the celebrated houses of Baring & Co.; Brown, Shipley & Co.; and a variety of other names. . . . I have obtained from the official custom-house returns some details of the sundries exported from the United Kingdom to the Northern States of America from the 1st of May, 1861, to the 31st of December, 1862. There were—muskets, 41,500; rifles, 341,000; gun-flints, 26,500; percussion-caps, 49,982,000; and swords, 2,250. The best information I could obtain leads me to believe that one third to a half may be added to these num
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Index (search)
321; cutting through the South at, 337 Atlanta campaign, the, faults of Sherman's organization in, 122 et seq.; questions of rank in, 150, 151; S. requested to write a critical history of, 162; Thomas's service in, 189; results of, 309; Sherman's tactics in, 340-343 Augusta, Ga., proposed destruction of, by Sherman, 317, 318, 333; Sherman's movement to, 332, 333, 337, 338 Austria, attitude in the Mexican affair, 385 B Bank of South Carolina, effect of brass on the cashier, 17 Baring Bros., 384 Bartlett, Miss, Harriet, married to S., 29 Bartlett, Prof. W. H. C., 26, 29, 74 Bates, Edward, U. S. Attorney-General, letter to S., Sept. 29, 1863, 93 Bayonet, the, superseded by the rifle, 145, 146 Bazaine, Marshal Francois A., occupation of Mexico, 391 Bean's Ferry, see Beard's Ferry. Beard's Ferry, Tenn., proposal to obstruct roads at, 211 Beatty, Maj.-Gen., Samuel, in battle of Nashville, 263 Beauregard, Gen. Pierre G. T., possible movements by, 199,
and sweet after the morning's ablution which she had just undergone; her sails were well hoisted, and her sheets well home; in short, she was a picture to look at, and the cat looked at her, as a cat only can look at a sleek mouse. And then only to think, that the sly little mouse, looking so pretty and so innocent, should have so much of that villanous material called sulphur in its little pouch! The master stated in his deposition, that the entire cargo belonged to the British house of Baring Bros., it being consigned to an agent of theirs in Boston. The object of so wording the deposition was, of course, to save the cargo as neutral property, but as I happened to know that the Boston house of the Barings, instead of being an agent merely, was a partner of the London house, the master took nothing by his deposition. Besides, if there had been no doubt as to the British ownership, sulphur going to an enemy's country is contraband of war; and in this case the contraband of war wa
ame speech, as a sufficient answer to Mr. Low's complaints:— If a ship without guns and without arms, [he is alluding to the Alabama when she left the Mersey,] is a dangerous article, surely rifled guns and ammunition of all sorts are equally—(cheers)— and even more dangerous. (Cheers.) I have referred to the bills of entry in the Custom-houses of London and Liverpool, and I find there have been vast shipments of implements of war to the Northern States, through the celebrated houses of Baring & Co. — (loud cheers and laughter),—Brown, Shipley & Co., of Liverpool, and a variety of other names, which I need not more particularly mention, but whose Northern tendencies are well known to this House. (Hear! Hear!) If the member for Rochdale, or the honorable member for Branchford wishes to ascertain the extent to which the Northern States of America have had supplies of arms from this country, they have only to go to a gentleman who, I am sure, will be ready to afford them every in
Armory, at sixty-five shillings each. The New-York agent purchased about the same number, and contracted for about fifteen thousand more; he also contracted for five thousand second-hand rifles, used in the Crimea. The first lot of guns were ready to be sent over; but the Persia would not take them, which delayed their arrival here. In a letter to the Governor, Mr. Crowninshield says, I have not ventured to approach the British Government about guns, at the strong recommendation of Mr. Baring; but one of the gun trade, who has the means to do so, has promised to sound them about buying some from them on his own account. I have but little hope of success. Colonel Fremont, who is here, assured me that he was confident I could do nothing in France, but has written for information, which he will give me. The Government seems inclined to favor the South, so far as the question of cotton is concerned,—I think no further. I have a credit of one hundred thousand dollars from Ohio, w
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, 484 Ballou, Adin, 437 Ballou, M. M., 166 Baltimore American, the, 515 Balzac, 87, 98 Bancroft, George, 171, 173, 183, 190, 451, 452 Bancroft, H. H., 141, 195-6 Bandelier, A. F., 144, 625 Bangs, Edward, 493 Bangs, J. K., 310 Banker's daughter, the, 270, 272, 274 Banks, banking, and paper Currencies, 438 Banks of Claudy, the, 511 Barante, 598 Barbara Allen's cruelty, 507 Barbara Frietchie, 266, 283 Barbarism of slavery, 346 Barde, Alexandre, 594, 597 Baring-Gould, 500 Bar Kochba, 608 Barlow, Joel, 86, 446, 542, 544 Barlow, S. L. M., 183, 184 Barnard, Frederick A. P., 413, 414 Barnard, Henry, 398, 404, 407, 408, 409 Barnard College, 50 Barnay, 588 Barby, 500 Barnes, 548 Barnett, 365 Barnum, P. T., 21, 23 Baron Rudolph, 274 Barrett, Lawrence, 269 Barrie, J. M., 279, 286, 292 Barriers burned away, 74 Barrows, 213 Barry, Phillips, 512 Barstow, Elizabeth, 44 Bartlett, John R., 153 Barton, William, 4
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
oldier. As his brigades started towards Cumberland Gap the orders were strict—no soldier was to leave his place in the line. He fell out of ranks with gun and cartridge box completely equipped. The field officer of the day asked him if it would not be better to march in his place in the ranks. He replied: It would look better, but it would not feel better to me. Have you a permit? said the officer. At this he handed the surgeon's certificate. How were you wounded? said the officer. Baring his breast and exposing the wound, he said: It went in there, and turning his back, he said: it stuck out there, and the surgeon pulled it out. He was ready for duty at any moment. We have not mentioned others, brave ones, who on the Federal side on that day performed feats of valor and deserved honorable mention at the hands of their superiors; nor those on the Confederate side who, like Field and Govan and many others, witnessed a good fight in behalf of the flag of the South and in t
The Daily Dispatch: February 13, 1861., [Electronic resource], Sudden death of the Hon. J. A. Rockwell, of Connecticut. (search)
orter than the shortest of the other three, only half as expensive as the cheapest of the other three, so superior in safety that no comparison can be made, navigable nearly twice as long as two of them, with a country at the terminus that does business all the year, in the name of heaven, why should it not come our way? Because, say some, New York and New Orleans and Montreal have the capital, and the shipping! Well, how did they get it? Did some mighty man of wealth — some Rothschild or Baring--set himself down at either place, and offer money to all who would bring business in that direction? Was the capital there before the business came? Did the capital make the business, or the business make the capital? It is silly to ask such a question. Men who had their fortunes to make settled there because they found them good places for business. They carried on business — it increased — money came with it-- people flocked in — they became great commercial places. Let it be seen
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