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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States: joint resolution in relation to the war. (search)
Foster, W. R. Smith, Ro. J. Breckinridge, John M. Martin, Porter Ingram, A. H. Garland, E. S. Dargan, D. Funsten, Thomas D. McDowell, J. R. McLean, R. R. Bridgers, G. W. Jones, B. S. Gaither, George W. Ewing, W. D. Holder, Dan. W. Lewis, Henry E. Read, A. T. Davidson, M. H. Macwillie, James Lyons, Caspar W. Bell, R. B. Hilton, Charles J. Villere, J. W. Moore, Lucius J. Dupre, John D. C. Atkins, Israel Welsh, William G. Swan, F. B. Sexton, T. L. Burnett, George G. Vest, Wm. Porcher Miles, E. Barksdale, Charles F. Collier, P. W. Gray, W. W. Clarke, William W. Boyce, John R. Chambliss, John J. McRae, John Perkins, Jr., Robert Johnson, James Farrow, W. D. Simpson, Lucius J. Gartrell, M. D. Graham, John B. Baldwin, E. M. Bruce, Thomas B. Hanly, W. P. Chilton, O. R. Kenan, C. M. Conrad, H. W. Bruce, David Clopton, W. B. Machen, D. C. DeJarnette, H. C. Chambers, Thomas Menees, S. A. Miller, James M. Baker, Robert W. Barnwell, A. G. Brown, Henry C. Burnett, Allen T. Caperton, John B. Clark, C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Records of Longstreet's corps, A. N. V. (search)
s on the right. Stafford's Louisiana brigade of Ewell's division held the centre between Whiting and Hill. The rest of Jackson's command was formed in a second line in rear of the first. On the right of D. H. Hill came in Armistead's and Wright's brigades of Huger's division, and on their right D. R. Jones' sub-division of Magruder's command, consisting of Tombs' and G. T. Anderson's brigades. The remainder of Huger's command (Mahone's and Ransom's brigades), and of Magruder's command (Barksdale's, Cobb's, Kershaw's and Semmes' brigades, the last two constituting McLaws' division), were disposed and used in support of Armistead, Wright and D. R. Jones. General Holmes, with his division, moved from New Market a short distance down the River road, and formed line of battle, but took no part in the action, deeming the enemy's position too strong for attack in that direction. Longstreet and A. P. Hill remained in reserve on the Long Bridge road. Owing to ignorance of the roads and t
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
To use his own words: The plain of Fredericksburg is so completely commanded by the Stafford Heights that no effectual opposition could be made to the construction of bridges or the passage of the river. Our position was therefore selected with a view to resisting the enemy's advance after crossing, and the river was guarded only by a force sufficient to impede his movements until the army could be concentrated. The Thirteenth, Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Twenty-first Mississippi, of Barksdale's brigade of McLaws's division, and the Third Georgia and Eighth Florida of Anderson's division, guarded the points where pontoons were to be laid, and displayed such skill as marksmen and such courage as men, sheltered behind the houses at the river banks, that the Federal army was delayed at the river bank for sixteen hours, giving the Confederate commander ample time to prepare for battle. During the night of the 11th and succeeding day Sumner's two corps, with one hundred and four ca
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
8 A. M. It was determined to hammer Hooker while Sedgwick was held at arm's length. Lee wisely selected Early to keep, if possible, Sedgwick out of the difficulty he proposed to have with Hooker, and, in addition to his own division, gave him Barksdale's brigade of McLaws's division and the reserve artillery under General Pendleton. Jackson found Anderson some six miles from Chancellorsville, intrenching. He ordered the work discontinued, for, as usual, he wanted at once to find his enemy. reserve artillery. On May 2d, at 9.55 A. M., Hooker telegraphed him: You are all right. You have but Early's division in your frontbalance all up here. To oppose Sedgwick, Early had his division of seventy-five hundred officers and men, and Barksdale's brigade of fifteen hundred, making nine thousand. In addition, Early had Andrew's battalion of artillery of sixteen guns, Graham's four guns, a Whitworth gun posted below the Massaponax, and portions of Walton's, Cabell's, and Cutts's battal
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
f the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia was about one hundred and sixty thousand. Both armies mourned the death of brave men and competent officers. In the Army of the Potomac four general officers were killed-Reynolds, Vincent, Weed, and Zook-and thirteen wounded, viz., Hancock, Sickles, Gibbon, Warren, Butterfield, Barlow, Doubleday, Paul, Brook, Barnes, Webb, Stanard, and Graham. In the Army of Northern Virginia five general officers were killed-Pender, Garnett, Armistead, Barksdale, and Semmesand nine wounded, viz., Hood, Hampton, Heth, J. M. Jones, G. T. Anderson, Kemper, Scales, and Jenkins. Meade showed no disposition to assume the offensive after Pickett's repulse. Like Lee at Fredericksburg, he did not want to lose the advantages of position, and was not certain the battle was over. The relative numbers in each army were still about the same, for their losses did not vary much, and the greater part of Lee's army was ready to receive him; he might have bee
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 14: siege of Petersburg. (search)
vident, unless Lee could get more men, he would lose that line of railroad. A lodgment once effected, enormous intrenchments would follow, which could not be assailed with success; but where were men to come from when the end of conscription had been reached and exchange of prisoners stopped? Lee did not believe the white population could supply the necessities of a long war without overtaxing its capacity, and thought the time had come to enlist the negroes as soldiers, and so wrote Hon. E. Barksdale, a member of the Confederate States House of Representatives, on February 18, 1865. Six months before, he had advocated their employment as teamsters, laborers, and mechanics, in place of whites, who, being replaced, could be restored to the ranks. He thought, too, that the negroes would be used against the South as fast as the Federals got possession of them; that he could make as good soldiers of them as his enemy, who attached great importance to their assistance; that the negroes
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
Army of Northern Virginia, 311, 312, 348, 379, 386. Army of the Potomac, 173, 182, 309, 313, 351, 377. Army of the Shenandoah, 352. Army of the Tennessee, 372. Army of Virginia, 175. Assault on Fort Stedman, 371. Austin, Stephen F., mentioned, 31. Averell, General William W., mentioned, 241, 242, 340, 341. Babcock, Colonel, of Grant's staff, mentioned, 392, 393. Ball, Mary, mentioned, x. Banks Ford, Va., 244. Banks, General Nathaniel P., mentioned, 109, 143, 180. Barksdale's brigade, 224; killed at Gettysburg, 302. Barlow, General, wounded at Gettysburg, 302. Bayard, General George D., mentioned, 228. Beauregard, General P. G. T., mentioned, 48, 87, 107, 108, 110, III, 132, 137, 346; notice of, 100; promoted, 133, 134; at Petersburg, 360; sent against Sherman, 369. Beaver Dam Creek, 158, 160, 168. Beckwith, General, Amos, 103. Benedict, Colonel G. G., letter to, 299. Benjamin, Judah P., 324. Benton, Thomas H., 52. Berkeley, Sir, William, m
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXV. April, 1863 (search)
ident could only see the necessity of placing this city under the command of a native Southern general, he might avoid much obloquy. The Smiths, Winders, and Elzeys, who are really foreigners, since the men from their States are not liable to conscription (vide Judge Campbell's decision), are very obnoxious to the people. Virginians can never be reconciled to the presence of a mercenary Swiss guard, and will not submit to imported masters. Notwithstanding the Enquirer urges it, and Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, persistently advocates it, Congress still refuses to confer additional powers on the President. Twice, within the last week, Congress has voted down the proposition to clothe the President with power to suspend the writ of habeas corpus. Congress has likewise refused to reconsider the vote postponing the consideration of the bill to create a Court of Claims. Judge S--was here, working for it; but was doomed to disappointment. A few nights since a full Federal band c
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 29 (search)
on all officers to arrest and bring to summary punishment all who shall in any way offend against the orders on this subject. R. E. Lee, General. We have no additional news from the battle-field, except the following dispatch from Winchester: Our loss is estimated at 10,000. Between 3000 and 4000 of our wounded are arriving here to-night. Every preparation is being made to receive them. Gens. Scales and Pender have arrived here wounded, this evening. Gens. Armistead, Barksdale, Garnett, and Kemper are reported killed. Gens. Jones, Heth, Anderson, Pettigrew, Jenkins, Hampton, and Hood are reported wounded. The Yankees say they had only two corps in the fight on Wednesday, which was open field fighting. The whole of the Yankee force was engaged in the last three days fighting. The number — is estimated at 175,000. The hills around Gettysburg are said to be covered with the dead and wounded of the Yankee Army of the Potomac. The fighting of these fou
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 35 (search)
e in the basement. The smoke led to the discovery, else the family might have been consumed with the house. One or two of the servants have absconded. At the sale of a Jew to-day an etegere brought $6000; a barrel of flour, $220; and meal, $25 per bushel. All else in proportion. He is a jeweler, and intends leaving the country. He will succeed, because he is rich. Yesterday the House passed the Senate bill, adjourning Congress on the 18th of February, to meet again in April. Mr. Barksdale, the President's organ in the House, moved a reconsideration, and it will probably be reconsidered and defeated, although it passed by two to one. Major Griswold being required by resolution of the Legislature to give the origin of the passport office, came to me to-day to write it for him. I did so. There was no law for it. January 22 Troops, a few regiments, have been passing down from Lee's army, and going toward North Carolina. A dispatch, in cipher, from Petersburg, was r
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