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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 22 0 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, I. Across Sherman's track (December 19-24, 1864) (search)
a gentleman, with a confidence as beautiful as the loyalty that inspired it. Under no other social regime, probably, have young girls been allowed such liberty of intercourse with the other sex as were those of the Old South--a liberty which the notable absence of scandals and divorces in that society goes far to justify. Dec. 24, 1864, Saturday Here we are in Macon at last, and this is the first chance I have had at my journal since we left home last Monday. Father went with us to Barnett, and then turned us over to Fred, who had come up from Augusta to meet us and travel with us as far as Mayfield. At Camack, where we changed cars, we found the train literally crammed with people going on the same journey with ourselves. Since the destruction of the Georgia, the Macon & Western, and the Central railroads by Sherman's army, the whole tide of travel between the eastern and western portions of our poor little Confederacy flows across the country from Mayfield to Gordon. Me
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
gar renegade, Andy Johnson, in power, and will give the Yankees an excuse for charging us with a crime which was in reality only the deed of an irresponsible madman. Our papers ought to reprobate it universally. About one o'clock we reached Barnett, where I used to feel as much at home as in Washington itself, but there was such a crowd, such a rush, such a hurrying to and fro at the quiet little depot, that I could hardly recognize it. The train on our Washington branch was crammed with soldiers; I saw no familiar face except Mr. Edmundson, the conductor. There is so much travel over this route now that three or four trains are run between Washington and Barnett daily, and sometimes double that number. We looked out eagerly for the first glimpse of home, and when the old town clock came into view, a shout of joy went up from us returning wanderers. When we drew up at the depot, amid all the bustle and confusion of an important military post, I could hardly believe that this
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 5 (search)
ance stores, to indulge in fireworks of every description, and there is so much shooting going on all around town that we wouldn't know it if a battle were being fought. Capt. Irwin came near being killed this afternoon by a stray minie ball shot by some careless person. The R. R. depot is in danger of being blown up by the quantities of gunpowder scattered about there, mixed up with percussion caps. Fred says that when he came up from Augusta the other day, the railroad between here and Barnett was strewn with loose cartridges and empty canteens that the soldiers had thrown out of the car windows. I have so little time for writing that I make a dreadful mess of these pages. I can hardly ever write fifteen minutes at a time without interruption. Sometimes I break off in the middle of a sentence and do not return to it for hours, and so I am apt to get everything into a jumble. And the worst of it is, we are living in such a state of hurry and excitement that half the time I
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, V. In the dust and ashes of defeat (may 6-June 1, 1865). (search)
nor of Utah before the war, came to see us this morning. She tried to go to Clarkesville, but found the country so infested with robbers and bushwhackers and Kirke's lambs, that she dared not venture three miles beyond Athens. The Yankees have committed such depredations there that the whole country is destitute and the people desperate. The poor are clamoring for bread, and many of them have taken to bushwhacking as their only means of living. Mrs. Cumming traveled from Union Point to Barnett in the same car with Mr. Stephens. The Yankee guard suffered him to stop an hour at Crawfordville [his home], in order to collect some of his clothing. As soon as his arrival became known, the people flocked to see him, weeping and wringing their hands. All his negroes went out to see him off, and many others from the surrounding plantations. Mrs. Cumming says that as the train moved off, all along the platform, honest black hands of every shape and size were thrust in at the window, wi
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 7 (search)
llars you have made out of me. Put it in your pocket; it will pay your board bill for a month, and get you two or three drinks besides. The captain turned to Mr. Barnett, who was standing by, and asked: What is the law in this country? Is a man allowed to defend himself when he is insulted? That depends on the nature of the insult, Mr. Barnett answered. Do you think this one sufficient to warrant me in knocking that man down? inquired the Yankee. I do think so, said Mr. Barnett. Yes! cried Charley, if you have any spirit in you, you ought to knock me down. Just come and try it, if you want a fight; I am ready to accommodate you. ButMr. Barnett. Yes! cried Charley, if you have any spirit in you, you ought to knock me down. Just come and try it, if you want a fight; I am ready to accommodate you. But it seems he wasn't spoiling for a fight after all, and concluded that it was beneath the dignity of a United States officer to engage in a street broil. It is the mature judgment of Philip sober that this Federal officer was acting the part of a gentleman in avoiding a difficulty which, in the excited state of public feeling, m
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 8 (search)
the Frenchman, as they call this missionary from the Freedman's Bureau, expound to them the gospel according to Phillips, Garrison & Co. The meeting was held in Mr. Barnett's grove, much against his will, it is said, but he didn't think it wise to refuse, and the negroes flocked there by thousands. I could hardly have believed theere his first footfall would once have been his death warrant, is a sufficient disgrace. After fruitless efforts to secure father's, Cousin Will Pope's, and Mr. Barnett's groves, he had to take the negro cemetery for the scene of his performances. Accordingly, about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, the candidates for double matrimous people. They arraigned Mrs. Gabe Toombs's Chloe for keeping company with a Yankee, but when she declared that she hadn't never kep‘ company with nobody but Joe Barnett (who has another wife, if not two or three of them) they let her off. They also reported Mrs. Margaret Jones to the commandant, as suffering a sick man (in her