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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
iam W. Boyce; Florida, Jackson Morton, James B. Owens, and J. Patton Anderson; Mississippi, Wiley P. Harris, W. S. Wilson, Walker Brooke, Alexander M. Clayton, James T. Harrison, William S. Barry, and J. A. P. Campbell; Alabama, Richard W. Walker, Colin J. McRae, William P. Chilton, David P. Lewis, Robert H. Smith, John Gill Shorter, Stephen F. Hale, Thomas Fearn, and Jabez L. M. Curry; Georgia, Robert Toombs, Martin J. Crawford, Benjamin H. Hill, Augustus R. Wright, Augustus H. Kenan, Francis S. Bartow, Eugenius A. Nisbet, Howell Cobb, Thomas R. R. Cobb, and Alexander H. Stephens; Louisiana, John Perkins, Jr., Charles M. Conrad, Edward Sparrow, Alexander De Clouet, Duncan F. Kenner, and Henry Marshall. The Texas delegates were not appointed until February 14th. These delegates had been appointed by the conventions of their respective States on the ground that the people had intrusted the State conventions with unlimited powers. They constituted both the convention that organize
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
Johnston's army from the Shenandoah consisted of the brigades of Jackson, Bee, Bartow, and Kirby Smith, 2 regiments of infantry not brigaded, 1 regiment of cavalry (ort. In the mean time Bee had formed a Confederate line of battle with his and Bartow's brigades of Johnston's army on the Henry house plateau, a stronger position tregiment of Heintzelman's division on the Federal side, and Evans's, Bee's, and Bartow's brigades on the Confederate side. The Confederates were dislodged and drivensly formed line and where what Beauregard called the mingled remnants of Bee's, Bartow's, and Evans's commands were re-formed under cover of Stonewall Jackson's briga delay in moving out in the early morning, or if Johnston's army, to which Bee, Bartow, and Jackson belonged, had not arrived But the heavy firing on the left soon diross the Run at all. The line taken up by Stonewall Jackson upon which Bee, Bartow, and Evans rallied on the southern part of Captain Charles Griffin, afterward
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
Capt. H. G. Latham; Loudoun (Va.) Artillery, Capt. Arthur L. Rogers; Shields's (Va.) Battery, Capt. J. C. Shields. Loss: k, 2; w, 8 =10. Total loss Army of the Potomac: k, 105; w, 519; m, 12 = 636. Army of the Shenandoah, General Joseph E. Johnston. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. T. J. Jackson: 2d Va., Col. J. W. Allen; 4th Va., Col. J. F. Preston; 5th Va., Col. Kenton Harper; 27th Va., Lieut.-Col. John Echols; 33d Va., Col. A. C. Cummings. Loss: k, 119; w, 442 = 561. Second Brigade, Col. F. S. Bartow (k): 7th Ga., Col. Lucius J. Gartrell; 8th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. M. Gardner. Loss: k, 60; w, 293 = 353. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. B. E. Bee (k): 4th Ala., Col. Jones (k), Col. S. R. Gist; 2d Miss., Col. W. C. Falkner; 11th Miss. (2 cos.), Lieut.-Col. P. F. Liddell; 6th N. C., Col. C. F. Fisher (k). Loss: k, 95; w, 309; m, 1 = 405. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. K. Smith (w), Col. Arnold Elzey: 1st Md. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. George H. Steuart; 3d Tennessee, Col. John C. Vaughn; 10th Va.,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Incidents of the first Bull Run. (search)
Confederate guns in the semicircle east of the Sudley road, when Griffin and Ricketts had taken position near the Henry house.-editors. turnpike, so long as Bee, Bartow, Evans, and Wheat were on that side, we firing over their heads; and about 11 o'clock two brass 12-pounder Napoleons from the New Orleans Washington Artillery unlrnor Alston, of South Carolina, summoning me to the side of my gallant commander, Brigadier-General Bee, who had been mortally wounded near the Henry house, where Bartow had been instantly killed almost at the same moment. When I reached General Bee, who had been carried back to the cabin where I had joined him the night before, elayed the enemy's movement across Young's Branch. But for that, they might have gained the Henry plateau, before Jackson and Hampton came up, and before Bee and Bartow had rallied their disorganized troops. Minutes count as hours under such circumstances, and trifles often turn the scale in great battles. General Jackson's
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
d obstinately. General Beauregard had joined me on Lookout Hill, and we could distinctly hear the sounds and see the smoke of the fight. But they indicated no hostile force that Evans's troops and those of Bee, Hampton, and Jackson, which we could see hurrying toward the conflict in that order, were not adequate to resist. On reaching the broad, level top of the hill south of the turnpike, Bee, appreciating the strength of the position, formed his troops (half of his own and half of Bartow's brigade) on that ground. But seeing Evans struggling against great odds, he crossed the valley and formed on the right and a little in advance of him. Here the 5 or 6 regiments, with 6 field-pieces, held their ground for an hour against 10,000 or 12,000 United States troops, General Fry (page 185) states that these troops were Andrew Porter's and Burnside's brigades, and one regiment of Heintzelman's division. Reckoning by the estimate of strength given by General Fry on page 194 thes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Ordinances adopted by the Convention of. Virginia in secret session in April and May, 1861. Convention between the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Confederate States of America. Message of Governor Moore, of Louisiana, to the General Assembly, November, 1861. Rules and Directions for Proceedings. in the Confederate States Patent Office. Jomini's Practice of War. Richmond: West & Johnston, 1863. Proceedings of the Confederate States Congress on the announcement of the death of Col. Francis S. Bartow, of the Army of the Confederate States, and late a delegate in Congress. from the State of Georgia. General Orders from the Confederate States Adjutant and Inspector-General's Office, for 1862. Twenty-four pamphlets discussing both sides of the Slavery Question. Sixty-seven miscellaneous pamphlets on various matters of general interest. Speech of Hon. J. P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, on the right of Secession, in the United States Senate, December 31st, 1860. Four Essays on The Righ
July 28. At Savannah, Ga., the funeral obsequies of Gen. Francis S. Bartow, who was killed at the battle of Bull Run, were celebrated to-day in most imposing style. There was an immense military and civic procession, comprising all the companies in the city, with detachments from the several garrisons of the neighboring forts and batteries. The cortege started from Christ Church, where an eloquent funeral sermon was preached by Bishop Elliott. The entire population of the city was present, and manifested the deepest sorrow. The bells were tolled and minute guns were fired during the march of the column. A salute of three rounds was fired by the infantry and artillery over the grave.--Charleston Mercury, July 29. Last night the steamer W. I. Maclay, Capt. Conway, bound from Cincinnati for St. Louis, Mo., was fired into at Cape Girardeau. The Maclay had landed at Cape Girardeau to discharge freight and passengers, and had no trouble whatever with any person or persons a
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
gade. Division. Killed. Includes the mortally wounded.Wounded. Missing. Total. First Bull Run, Va.             July 21, 1862.             8th Georgia Bartow's Johnston's 41 159 -- 200 4th Alabama Bee's Johnston's 40 157 -- 197 7th Georgia Bartow's Johnston's 19 134 -- 153 33d Virginia Jackson's Johnston's 45 Bartow's Johnston's 19 134 -- 153 33d Virginia Jackson's Johnston's 45 101 -- 146 27th Virginia Jackson's Johnston's 19 122 -- 141 4th Virginia Jackson's Johnston's 31 100 -- 131 Hampton Legion ---------- Beauregard's 19 100 2 121 Wilson's Creek, Mo.             August 10, 1861.             3d Arkansas ---------- Pearce's 25 84 1 110 3d Missouri S. G Graves's Rains's 22 49 3 74 rigade commanders. Brigadier-General Robert S. Garnett Killed at Cheat Mountain. Brigadier-General Barnard E. Bee Killed at First Bull Run. Brigadier-General Francis S. Bartow Killed at First Bull Run. Brigadier-General Felix K. Zollicoffer Killed at Mill Springs. Brigadier-General Ben. McCulloch Kil
ible effect, but our men flinched not until their number had been so diminished by the well-aimed and steady volleys that they were compelled to give way for new regiments. The 7th and 8th Georgia regiments, commanded by the gallant and lamented Bartow, are said to have suffered heavily during the early part of the battle. Kemper's, Shields', and Pendleton's batteries were in this part of the field, and did fearful execution. I regret to be unable to name all the regiments engaged, in their oat our brave Southerners had not been conquered by the overwhelming hordes of the North. It is, however, due to truth to say that the result of this hour hung trembling in the balance. We had lost numbers of our most distinguished officers. Gens. Bartow and Bee had been stricken down; Lieut-Col. Johnson, of the Hampton Legion, had been killed; Col. Hampton had been wounded; but there was at hand the fearless general whose reputation as a commander was staked on this battle: Gen. Beauregard pr
orcements came. These were led on by Colonel Jackson, Colonel Bartow, General Bee, and General Jones. The conflict went onis brigade from Gen. Johnston's forces, I think, was next; Bartow was next; Gen. Bonham next; Gen. Jones was next, and Gen. and Wheat's battalion were slaughtered; there the gallant Bartow fell; and that for many of the bloody hours of the contestupport. That again checked the current for an instant. Col. Bartow then came. That again impeded its resistless progress; e road, and had opened a most galling fire. Gens. Bee and Bartow, and Hampton's Legion, rallied to sustain him. The fight w the hill. Against the first of these it was that Bee and Bartow fought and fell, and at length, at fearful sacrifice of li regiment, I think, of Tennesseeans. Later in the day Colonel Bartow was shot near this spot, while leading the Seventh Geo fell. In the rear was the dead charger of the lamented Gen. Bartow, killed under him, himself to fall soon after. But the
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