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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
ils from the Chatham artillery, under Capt. Joseph S. Cleghorn, an officer who was also charged by the governor with all matters relating to ordnance; from the Savannah Guards, Capt. John Screven, and from the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Capt. Francis S. Bartow, whose brilliant eloquence had been devoted to the cause of separation. This force, numbering 134 men, was carried by boat to Cockspur island on the morning of the 3d, and the occupation was effected without resistance from the few men to meet at Milledgeville on January 6, 1861, to decide upon the action to be taken by the State of Georgia. Among the delegates were some of the ablest men that Georgia has produced. Immediate secession was advocated by Thomas R. R. Cobb, Francis S. Bartow and Robert Toombs, while Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin H. Hill and Herschel V. Johnson used all their influence for delay until there could be a congress of the Southern States to take united action. But all parties pledged Georgia to re
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ginally a part of the company of that name which went with Bartow to Virginia and was assigned to the Eighth Georgia regimen authorized enlistments for the full term of the war. Francis S. Bartow, captain of the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, of Savannarrespondence is now forgotten except one burning line from Bartow's pen: I go to illustrate Georgia. It was a noble utteransubsequently was assigned to the Eighth regiment, of which Bartow was elected colonel. The earliest regiments enlisted foH. Colquitt; Seventh, Col. L. J. Gartrell; Eighth, Col. Francis S. Bartow; Ninth, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth, Col. Lafayetten McLendon. Eighth regiment Georgia volunteers: Col. Francis S. Bartow; Lieut.-Col. John R. Towers; Maj. E. J. Magruder; at Chickamauga and in east Tennessee. Its first colonel, Bartow, commanded a brigade and was killed at First Manassas. Heunteers, Col. L. J. Gartrell; Eighth volunteers, Col: Francis S. Bartow; Ninth volunteers, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth volunte
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
on of Virginia the Confederate government hurried troops to that State from every part of the Confederacy, showing great diligence in preparing to defend the soil of the Old Dominion at every point. Of the Georgia regiments ordered there, part were assigned to the army of the Shenandoah commanded by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. The Second brigade of that army consisted of the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Eleventh Georgia regiments of infantry, and the First Kentucky, and was commanded by Col. Francis S. Bartow. The disposition of the other Georgia troops was as follows: The Sixth and Tenth regiments were sent to Yorktown and vicinity, Col. Lafayette McLaws, with the Tenth, being put in command at Williamsburg; and Ramsey's First, which had experienced soldier life at Pensacola, formed part of the force under Gen. R. S. Garnett at Laurel hill in western Virginia. To this place the First had marched from Staunton, a distance of 120 miles, early in June, 1861. Gen. George B. McClellan, c
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
be found in any city of the Union. Brigadier-General Francis S. Bartow Brigadier-General Francis S. BartoBrigadier-General Francis S. Bartow, a native of Georgia, was at the beginning of the war a prominent lawyer of Savannah and recognized as one ofr before the secession of the State of Georgia. Captain Bartow was in communication with his company, and as ss attached to the Eighth Georgia regiment, of which Bartow was elected colonel; was ordered to Virginia, and bsharp correspondence between Governor Brown and Captain Bartow. It was in one of these communications that BaBartow uttered the memorable saying, I go to illustrate Georgia. And he did illustrate his native State glorioun his official report, speaking of the death of General Bartow, Colonel Fisher and LieutenantCol-onel Johnson,ous charge, the colonel of the same regiment, Francis S. Bartow, was slain. His commission as brigadier-generhis celebrated regiment, and was by the side of General Bartow when the latter received his mortal wound, catc
tives abroad, and, taking the company alluded to as a sample of the Georgians generally, so have the people of that patriotic State. They will worthily sustain the honor and renown of a people who, on every battle-field of this country, have always been foremost in the fight. The spirit that animated the gallant Pulaski, (in the shade of whose monument they were formed,) seems to have inspired these intrepid soldiers to do and dare all things for that independence and liberty which they love so well, and without which they do not wish to live. The Oglethorpe Light Infantry, as previously stated, is a very full company. The following are its officers: Francis S. Bartow, Captain; Jos. J. West, 1st Lieutenant; Hamilton Cowper, 2d Lieutenant; A. F. Butler, 3d Lieutenant; J. L. Holcombe, 1st Sergeant; Frederick Bliss, 2d Sergeant; H. A. Crane, 3d Sergeant; W. F. Shellman, 4th Sergeant; and Chas. C. Hardwick, Treasurer. The battalion is now quartered at the Fairfield Race Course.
e, Alabama. Nich. Davis, Jr., Huntsville, Alabama. Arkansas. Robert W. Johnson, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Albert Rust, Little Rock, Arkansas. H. F. Thomasson. Van Buren, Arkansas. A. H. Garland, Little Rock, Arkansas. W. W. Watkins, Carrolton, Arkansas. Florida. Jackson Morton, Milton, Florida. G. T. Ward, Tallahassee, Florida. J. B. Owens, Cottage P. O., Florida. Georgia. Robert Toombs, Washington, Georgia. Howell Cobb, Athens, Georgia. Francis S. Bartow, Savannah, Georgia. Martin J. Crawford, Columbus, Georgia. Eugenius A. Nisbet, Macon, Georgia. Benjamin H. Hill, Lagrange, Georgia. A. R. Wright, Rome, Georgia. T. R. R. Cobb, Athens, Georgia. A. H. Keenan, Milledgeville, Georgia. A. H. Stephens, Crawfordsville, Georgia. Louisiana. J. Perkins, Jr., Ashwood, Madison Parish, La. A. de Clouet, St. Martinsville, La. C. H. Conrad, New Orleans, La. D. F. Kenner, New River, Ascension Parish, La. E. Sparrow, P
n hook" before the assembling of Congress. Mr. Keitt says he is accustomed to bagging wild turkeys, and thinks there is "some game" in the neighborhood of Fairfax. Hon. John Perkins, of Louisiana, is, we believe, at Petersburg. Col. Francis S. Bartow, of Georgia. is with Gen. Johnston's command at or near Martinsburg, at the head of his regiment, doing duty, however, as Brevet Brigadier General. We understand Col. Bartow has resigned his seat in Congress, where his knowledge of milif his regiment, doing duty, however, as Brevet Brigadier General. We understand Col. Bartow has resigned his seat in Congress, where his knowledge of military affairs will be much missed. He was chairman of the Military Committee, but we have no doubt he will give a still better exemplification of his familiarity with the art of war, in the wider and more active field where he is now stationed. He is in the vanguard, and we trust his example will find many imitations among our leading men.
The distinguished dead. --The Central train, which arrived in this city at eight o'clock last night, brought down the bodies of Col. (acting Brig. Gen.) Francis S. Bartow, of Georgia, Gen. Bernard Bee, of South Carolina, and Lieut. Col. Johnson, of Hampton Legion, who fell in the battle at Manassas on Sunday last. Three hearses were in readiness, and the remains of the brave dead were conveyed, (escorted by the Armory Guard, Lieut. Kerr, preceded by their band playing a funeral dirge,) to the Capitol, where the bodies were attended during the night by a guard of honor specially detailed for that purpose. They will be carried South this morning. Colonel. Bartow died a noble and brave death. He first received a shot which shattered one of his feet; but even in this disabled condition he maintained his place at the head of his men. He had reached a fence which crossed the direction of his charge, and was supporting himself, waving his sword and cheering his gallant band on
Artillery, of this city, have received intelligence of his death. The Col. Willcox mentioned elsewhere as among the prisoners, surrendered to the 28th Virginia Regiment. It will gratify every true Virginian to learn of the capture of Captain Edward C. Carrington, who is connected with some of the best families in the South, none of whom would object to his consignment to the hands of an executioner. Another prisoner of rank is Col. Corcoran, of the 69th New York Regiment. Col. Francis S. Bartow, of Georgia, had taken the colors of his regiment in his hands, and was leading a brilliant charge, when he fell. The bereaved wife of the gallant officer was in Richmond when she heard the news of his death. Col. Kemper's Alexandria Artillery receive high praise for their bravery in the action.--Their guns did tremendous execution. Additional. The Central train arrived from Manassas Junction at half-past 7 o'clock last evening Several thousand persons had assembled, a
John Hix was run over by the Cavalry and badly bruised. Wm. Bailey was wounded in the jaw. The killed and wounded in the Rozwell (Ga.) Guards was mostly caused in the attack on Sherman's Battery, and at the time when the gallant Gen. Francis S. Bartow fell. From other sources, and principally from the wounded now in our city, Mr. Pritchard learns that-- Capt. Towers, of the Miller (Ga.) Rifles, is safe; Lieut. Hall, of the Rifles, is said by some to have been severely woundedGeneral reports state that the Eighth Regiment of Georgia Volunteers suffered very severely in killed and wounded. Lieut. Col. Montgomery Gardner (formerly of the U. S. Army, and attached to the First Independent Regiment of Ga., of which Gen. Bartow was previously Colonel,) was slightly wounded in the leg, and had his horse shot from under him. The wounded in Richmond that I visited on yesterday, express their heartfelt thanks for the God-like kindness which they are receiving at the
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