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Discharged. --Advices from the North state that quite a number of the general officers of the Federal army are to be sent home, or, as is said. "honorably discharged!" Among the number are Morris and Sanford, of New York; Runyan, of New Jersey; Cox, Schleigh and Bates, of Ohio; and Patterson, of Pennsylvania.
The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], What is to be done with the prisoners? (search)
of horror unequalled by those of the French Revolution. The Administration, therefore, decided, as I have said, not to hang any of the pirates. But within a day or two the question has been again raised in the Cabinet. At least one member of that body is in favor, as he expresses it, of discarding all squeamish nonsense, and of hanging every rebel found in arms against the Government, whether taken on the sea or land! This is undoubtedly the course that ought to be taken, if the Government regards this matter as simply an insurrection. This is the view taken of it by President Lincoln; and he, too, although he deplores the necessity of such dreadful measures, is in favor of such a course as will show to the world that we are in earnest in this matter, and that traitors found in arms against the Government must expect and receive a traitor's doom. Mr. Bates and Mr. Blair both go for extreme measures, regardless of consequences; and Mr. Smith also entertains the same views.
The Daily Dispatch: August 24, 1861., [Electronic resource], Attorney General Bates to the bogus Convention. (search)
Attorney General Bates to the bogus Convention. --A letter from Mr. Bates to Mr. A. F. Ritchie, of Marion county, was read in the Wheeling Convention on Thursday last. It was in answer to an inquiry as to the propriety of forming a new State in the Western part of Virginia. Mr. Bates say: The formation of a new StateMr. Bates to Mr. A. F. Ritchie, of Marion county, was read in the Wheeling Convention on Thursday last. It was in answer to an inquiry as to the propriety of forming a new State in the Western part of Virginia. Mr. Bates say: The formation of a new State out of Western Virginia is an original, independent act of revolution I do not dany the power of revolution. (I do not call it right — for it is never prescribed, it exists in force only, and has and can have no law but the will of the revolutionist.) Any attempt to carry it out involves a plain breach of both the Constitutions —Mr. Bates say: The formation of a new State out of Western Virginia is an original, independent act of revolution I do not dany the power of revolution. (I do not call it right — for it is never prescribed, it exists in force only, and has and can have no law but the will of the revolutionist.) Any attempt to carry it out involves a plain breach of both the Constitutions — of Virginia and the nation. And honor it is plain that you cannot take that course without weakening if not destroying, your claims upon the sympathy and support of the General Government; and without disconcerting the plan already adopted both by Virginia and the General Government, for the re-organization of the revolted State
beas corpus. It has been found that the safety of the Republic required the suspension of that writ. The Administration is now satisfied that the safety of the Republic requires that those papers in the North which do not yield a hearty support to the Government and to all the measures of the Administration, and which, by their sympathy with the South, nourish at the North a hostile feeling against the Government, shall be warned to desist, and if they persist, shall be suppressed. Attorney General Bates has been consulted on the subject, and says that the Government would be perfectly justified in doing so. The New era--Eradication of State lines — a National army to be organized.>[From the Washington Correspondence of the Philadelphia Inquirer.] A new era has dawned. The recent order of the War Department, ordering to Washington all the regiments now organized in the Northern States, and all parts of regiments, even if unarmed and without uniforms, is but one step in the
The Daily Dispatch: September 10, 1861., [Electronic resource], The New York Herald upon the Situation. (search)
resolutions reported by them, and adopted by the Council: That the Commissioners of Streets generally recommend to the Council that the Auditor of the city be, and he is hereby, authorized to draw his warrant on the Chamberlain in favor of Mrs. Bates, widow of the late Micajah Bates, Superintendent of Streets, for the sum of $450, being one quarter's salary of her late husband, and that Mrs. Bates be requested by the Council to accept the same as a token of their high regard for her late huMrs. Bates be requested by the Council to accept the same as a token of their high regard for her late husband as a man and his long- continued and valuable services to the city as an officer. Mr. R. G. Morriss sent a communication to the Council offering to relinquish the rent of one of his houses, occupied by the family of an absent soldier, on condition that the Council should release the city taxes. Referred to the Committee on Finance. (Present, Mr. D. J. Burr.) A communication was read from D. M. Miller, requesting the pay of City Assessor to be increased to one per cent. on the amount
th the state of affairs in Missouri are here, in daily intercourse with the President, and they assert the positive necessity of taking immediate and decisive action. They confirm the statement made in recent letters from prominent citizens of the Northwest, that unless something is speedily done for Missouri all will be lost there. The Attorney General is unreserved in his expression of opinion concerning General Fremont, and does not hesitate to pronounce his retention a public crime. Mr. Bates is in receipt daily of letters from important sources in Missouri, indicating a dangerous condition of affairs in that State. His temper and his fears are greatly exercised by these dispatches. A full consultation on the whole subject will be held to-morrow in a Cabinet meeting. The violation of the Savannah blockade. The publicity given to the violation of the Savannah blockade by the British steamer Bermuda, is said to have proceeded from Lord Lyons's dinner table. Information
e who are intimately acquainted with Lord Lyons believe that in this as in other matters he has observed his usual discretion in refraining from premature expressions of opinion. Important advices from England — her Relations with the United States, Etc. "Ion," of the 22d inst., has correspondence from Washington in the Sun, from which we make the following extract: Advices were received from London by the last packet from the leading American bankers, Mr. George Peabody and Mr. Bates, stating their own opinion to be that the British Government is desirous of preserving peace with the United States, and that it will not recognize the Confederate States, nor attempt to raise the blockade of their ports. Some hesitation in business is caused in Boston and New York by an apprehension that the British Government will resent the arrest of the ministers Messrs. Mason and Slidell. Stocks have also fallen in consequence of the uncertainty as to future relations with Great
ty, a short time since. It appears that in a part of the town called the "Log Cabin," an English family of the name of Reeves, consisting of mother and daughter, have lived for the last twelve years. The house they occupied consisted of three small rooms and a shop where they have, since the death of the husband of Mrs. Reeves, who was killed on the railroad some four years since, principally maintained themselves with their needles. The daughter has been twice married, once to a man named Bates, and at his decease, to a man named Cahoon, said to be with the army. From her second husband she has been separated for some time. Two or three years since a man named Alvin Finch, a blacksmith by trade, commenced work upon the railroad bridge in that vicinity and boarded with Mrs. Reeves. Since last spring he has had no steady work, but nothing unusual was noticed until yesterday morning. Mrs. Reeves went to a man named Maguire and asked him to come to the house as Finch was crazy.
Centreville, Dec. 1,P. M. --New York papers of the 29th of November have been received here. The Herald. of that date, says that the destination of Butler and Burnside's expeditions is to reinforce Sherman at Port Royal. A portion of Butler's force left Hampton Roads on Wednesday last. The Times says that the Cabinet is divided on the policy to pursue in regard to slaves. Messrs. Chase, Cameron, and Welles are in favor of emancipation, and Messrs, Seward, Blair, and Bates are against emancipation. The Herald expresses the opinion that McClellan will not advance. On the other hand all the signs are otherwise. Refugees who reached Centreville this evening, from Alexandria, report that an immense collection of wagon trains are on this side, and general movements are indicative of speedy operations. Forage is very scarce in Washington city, and animals are suffering severely. Coal is not to be had, and wood is $10 per cord. General Fremont r
The Daily Dispatch: December 12, 1861., [Electronic resource], Successors of Messrs. Mason and Slidell. (search)
ailway." As you will see, by referring to the foot-note, it was put under the doors in Baltimore on the night of the 26th September. Knowing your sympathy for my native State in her unfortunate affection, I place the prayer of her oppressed at your disposal. A. Marylander. From Lincoln and Hicks From Dodge and from Dix, The people, kind heaven, dissever, With cuff, and with kicks, And with back-handed licks, they would rule and formant us forever. From Scott's gentle care, From Bates and from Blair, And Union men loyal from station; From Yankees is arms, In quest of free farms, Great Goodness, deliver the From telegraph lies. And Government spies. Who turk everywhere to inspect us; From the Federal gag. And the Gideon flag. We pray thee, good Lord, to protect us. From fasting and prayer, To wheedle God a care, Where none is deserved to be given; From the negro-war band, Who would blood stain the land, We pray thee to screen us, good Heaven. From the gloomy
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