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created a terrific scene of delight. More O mys were expended on it than I have heard for a couple of years or so. The old lady went almost out of her senses. I put the photographs in it for them, and wrote her name, with your regards, on one of the blank leaves. All sorts of inquiries were made about you, the baby, and mamma, and when I left Mrs.--wished me to kiss the baby for her and give gold love to you. The old lady said that she'd been a mind to send to me for some beef, so I told Bates just now to get a good large piece and take it up to them. They would not take any pay from the bishop, because Col. Hammond had sent more money to pay his bill than they thought right, so they squared accounts and cleared their consciences by refusing any pay from the bishop. Some artist of an illustrated paper had been there taking a sketch of the house, and left them a very good copy, which delighted them much. I gave them that copy of the President and myself which you sent them, so t
BrigAlfred TylerT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellHenry OxnordBoston240 221 BrigHollanderT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellBates & Co.Boston270 222 BarkFrederick WarrenJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonNathaniel GoddardBoston383 223 ShipRajahJ. Stetson'sJ. SteterT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellEnoch & Samuel TrainBoston & Medford415 295 BarkOlgaT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellBates & Co.Boston343 296 ShipMiltonT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellHenry OxnardBoston611 297 ShipGranadaT. Magoun'sF. Waterm351 Sch.TonquinT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellMinot & HooperBoston524 352 BarkDouglassT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellBates & Co.Boston491 353 ShipSantiagoT. Magoun'sF. Waterman & H. EwellW. H. GoddardBoston433 354 BarkWm. H. ShailerT. Magoun'illiam LincolnBoston400 369 BarkEdwinJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisWales & Co.Boston350 370 BarkHollanderT. Magoun'sH. EwellBates & Co.Boston304 371 BrigAlertT. Magoun'sH. EwellW. F. Wild & Co.Boston172 372 Sch.EugeneT. Magoun'sH. EwellParker
the early morning of the 4th of July, the day after the battle ended, not one wounded man of the great number who had fallen was left on the ground. The inspector-general of the army himself reported this interesting fact from personal examination. Ambulances going to the front—before the Wilderness campaign In the foreground of this photograph stand seven ambulances and two quartermasters' wagons, being prepared for active service in the field. The scene is the headquarters of Captain Bates, of the Third Army Corps, near Brandy Station. The following month (May, 1864) the Army of the Potomac moved to the front under General Grant in his decisive campaign from the Wilderness onward. A large quantity of stores lie upon the ground near the quartermasters' wagons ready for transportation to the front. As it became evident that any idea of providing each regiment with its individual hospital was impracticable in a large command, efforts were made to afford hospital facilities
the early morning of the 4th of July, the day after the battle ended, not one wounded man of the great number who had fallen was left on the ground. The inspector-general of the army himself reported this interesting fact from personal examination. Ambulances going to the front—before the Wilderness campaign In the foreground of this photograph stand seven ambulances and two quartermasters' wagons, being prepared for active service in the field. The scene is the headquarters of Captain Bates, of the Third Army Corps, near Brandy Station. The following month (May, 1864) the Army of the Potomac moved to the front under General Grant in his decisive campaign from the Wilderness onward. A large quantity of stores lie upon the ground near the quartermasters' wagons ready for transportation to the front. As it became evident that any idea of providing each regiment with its individual hospital was impracticable in a large command, efforts were made to afford hospital facilities
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General George H. Steuart's brigade at the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
Rock creek, and the breast-works were occupied and held. July 3d Steuart's brigade (composed of the First and Third North Carolina, Second Maryland, Tenth, Twenty-third and Thirty-seventh Virginia regiments), separated from our line of battle on our right, with rear and flank exposed, with no artillery support, fought for five hours a largely superior force--(General O. O. Howard says the Twelfth Corps.) The enemy's artillery played on us from front, rear and flank--(vide Whitelaw Reid in Bates' Battle of Gettysburg.) Only one other brigade came to our assistance, but took no part in the assault. Our brigade was then moved to the left, and our line was reformed. A writer, speaking of the men at this moment, says: The compressed lip, the stern brow, the glittering eye, told that those before me would fight to the last. When the final order to charge was received, the General remarked, it is a slaughter pen. A gallant captain replied, it can't be helped, it is ordered, placed him
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers at Gettysburg. (search)
iments were certainly not stronger than the Confederate ones. His statement, that the figures given by Meade and Butterfield do not show, as has been alleged by Dr. Bates, all the men borne upon the rolls; nor, I think, as Confederate writers have asserted, only the men present for duty on the battle-field, but all the men who at and Stannard's Vermont brigade was added to the First corps on the same morning: of this fact I am positively assured by the Comte de Paris in a letter to me, and Bates also states it. But the fact is very apparent that they were not included in the returns of those corps for the 30th from the returns themselves. Butterfield and Bates show that they numbered 2,500 each, making 5,000 for the two, and that number should be added. We shall thus have-- Number for duty by report of 30th June99,475 Lockwood's and Stannard's brigades5,000 Addition to cavalry, say2,000 Brigade of regular batteries500   Total for duty106,975 Meade certainly had at lea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of a section of the Third Maryland battery on the Mississippi in the Spring of 1863. (search)
in the Spring of 1863. By Captain W. L. Ritter. Baltimore, Md., February 27, 1879. Rev. John William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir — I give a few items which may serve as a branch link in the great historical chain that is being forged for the future historian. April 2, 1863, Lieutenant Ritter was ordered to Deer creek, up the Mississippi river, to take command of a section of the Third battery of Maryland artillery, commanded by Lieutenant Bates, of Waddell's Alabama artillery. This section, with one of Bledsoe's Missouri battery and one of a Louisiana battery, were under the command of Lieutenant Wood, of the Missouri artillery. These sections were all attached to General Ferguson's brigade, that had been operating along the Mississippi, firing into transports and harassing the enemy in every conceivable manner. In March, 1863, when Porter's fleet, consisting of five gunboats and several transports, entered Black bayou fo
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
ders were given for an infantry review the next day (Tuesday). I was invited on this day (Monday) to dine with General Hooker, to meet the President and Mrs. Lincoln. We had a very handsome and pleasant dinner. The President and Mrs. Lincoln, Mr. Bates, Secretary of the Interior, a Dr. Henry, of Colorado, who accompanied the President, Mrs. Stoneman, wife of Major General Stoneman, besides the corps commanders, constituted the party. The next day, owing to the ground not being in condition, of war. I saw George Son of General Meade. the day of the cavalry review. He told me he was to have a leave that day, so that he will undoubtedly be there when this reaches you. The day I dined with Hooker, he told me, in the presence of Mr. Bates, Secretary of the Interior, that he (Hooker) had told the President that the vacant brigadiership in the regular army lay between Sedgwick and myself. I replied that I had no pretensions to it, and that if I were the President I would leave it
7, 269, 278. Backus, Capt., I, 163. Baird, Capt., I, 220, 227. Baker, Edward D., I, 226. Banks, Nathaniel P., I, 225, 249, 250, 256, 262, 268-271, 273, 276; II, 144, 234, 239. Barclay, Clem., I, 339. Barksdale, W., II, 80, 85, 86, 88. Barlow, Francis C., II, 48, 49, 51, 65, 96, 113, 419. Barnes, James, II, 64, 83, 84, 100, 182, 188, 327, 332, 333, 335, 337, 339, 340. Barry, Commodore, I, 3. Barstow, S. F., II, 166. Bartlett, Joseph J., II, 100, 107, 231. Bates, Mr., I, 363, 364. Baxter, Henry, II, 48, 49, 50. Bayard, Geo. D., I, 136, 232, 261, 267, 334, 336, 338. Bayfield, Capt., I, 208. Beauregard, P. G. T., I, 196, 257, 271; II, 148. Beckham, Robert F., I, 212, 258, 324, 380, 389; II, 150, 262. Beecher, Henry Ward, II, 236, 237. Belknapp, Col., I, 100. Bell, John, I, 213. Belton, Col., I, 168. Benedict, G. G., II, 350, 351. Benham, H. W., II, 281. Benning, Henry L., II, 81. Berdan, Col., II, 69, 75. Berkele
1,0361,6071,7545,4605,9836,468 French's Division1,5172,1702,3907,3847,9672,409 Total of Stewart's Corps4,4406,4777,12821,68528,42818,478 Lee's Corps92424 Johnson's Division1,8172,6402,8749,28810,00410,345 Stevenson's Division2,3433,1033,4718,5299,2488,640 Clayton's Division1,5522,2102,4638,2348,8758,948 Total of Lee's Corps5,7127,9538,81726,05128,15127,957 Cheatham's Corps91315 Cleburne's Division2,3583,3743,65810,72011,62411,923 Cheatham's Division1,3811,7951,9849,27210,25010,605 Bates's Division1,0381,5551,7347,0457,6837,886 Total of Cheatham's Corps4,7776,7247,38527,03729,57030,429 Engineer Troops375469484743767767 Total of Infantry15,30421,62323,81775,51681,945775,630 cavalry. Escort of Army Headquarters130151153241248248 Escort of Stewart's Corps295155939798 Escort of Lee's Corps767984192202198 Escort of Cheatham's Corps283739566062 Jackson's Cavalry Division2,0012,8903,1524,1634,5084,508 Total of Cavalry2,2643,2083,4834,7455,1155,114 Artillery. Artillery o
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