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the afternoon of the 20th July, directed an attack upon it, designing to take advantage of a gap between two of its divisions. The attack was led by Walker's and Bates' divisions of Hardee's corps; and the massed troops, in admirable order, burst through the gap in the enemy's lines, and for a time appeared about to destroy his furred one of the most extraordinary incidents of the war. It is said that Gen. Hood was about to publish a victory along his line, when Finney's Florida brigade in Bates' division, which was to the left of the Confederate centre, gave way before the skirmish line of the enemy! Instantly Bates' whole division took the panic, and brBates' whole division took the panic, and broke in disorder. The moment a small breach was thus made in the Confederate lines, the whole of two corps unaccountably and instantly fled from their ditches, almost without firing a gun. It was a disgraceful panic; muskets were abandoned where they rested between the logs of the breastworks; and everything that could impede fligh
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
e granddaughter of Lord Byron. June 23. Breakfast with Lord Ebrington; calls; Parliament; dinner with Mr. T. Baring. June 24. Breakfast with Sir H. Holland; visit at Lansdowne House; visited the Duchess of Sutherland at Stafford House; declined her invitation to stay at Stafford House; dinner at Lord Hatherton's, where I met old Lord Haddington. June 25. Duchess of Sutherland took me to the Crystal Palace,—a wonder. Before going, met at Stafford House Lord Shaftesbury; dinner at Mr. Bates's, where were many distinguished people. Among them were Lord Wensleydale, Henry Labouchere (afterwards Lord Taunton), and the Russian Minister. June 26. Visited the Athenaeum Club, where I have been made a pro tem. member; visited the House of Commons; breakfasted in the morning with the Duke of Argyll, where I met Lord Aberdeen; dined with Lord Granville, where I met Lord Clarendon and enjoyed him much, for he seemed a good man; then to a great party at Lansdowne House. June 27
voring the division of the State of Virginia was at first voted down in the Senate. The proposition to form a new State, to bear the name of Kanawha, was, however, already very strong, and a convention was called to carry out this plan. Attorney-General Bates, of Lincoln's cabinet, in a letter to a member of the convention, strongly opposed it, declaring that the formation of a new State out of western Virginia is an original, independent act of revolution. Any attempt to carry it out involvet time heard of in our history, but as representing the good old commonwealth. The constitutional convention met at Wheeling, November 26, 1861, and, influenced more by the success of the United States army than by the grave objections urged by Bates, framed a new constitution, which was ratified May 3, 1862, by the qualified voters of forty-eight of the old Virginia counties. Berkeley and Jefferson counties were subsequently added. The mountain counties of Morgan, Hampshire, Hardy, Pendlet
the enemy there November 26. Enemy evacuate on the 28th. November 30. Battle of Franklin. December 2. Reached Nashville. December 6. Fenner's Battery was ordered to join General Forrest's command at Murfreesboroa; participated in the battle of Murfreesboroa on the 8th, and was still with Forrest when the battles of Nashville were fought, on the 15th and 16th, and the great retreat commenced. In this fight, which is called the second of Murfreesboroa, it will be remembered that Bates's Infantry Division was stampeded early in the action, causing the loss of several guns of the Fifth Company, Washington Artillery. On this occasion (one of the few instances, if not the only one during the war) six pieces of field artillery, being four Napoleons of Fenner's Battery and two rifled pieces of Missouri Battery, placed in position by General Forrest,—their horses having been sent to the rear across Stone River,—held the line for three-quarters of an hour against the enemy's ent
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 19: 1860-1863: Aet. 53-56. (search)
shall avail myself of opportunities for bringing myself to your recollection by such brochures as I have time for. One of them will open to your view something of the nature of the contest here waging to obtain for England a suitable Museum of Natural History, equivalent to her wealth and colonies and maritime business. In this I find you a valuable ally, and have cited from the Reports of your Museum of Comparative Zoology in support of my own claims for space. I was glad to hear from Mr. Bates that the Megatherium had not gone to the bottom, but had been rescued, and that it was probably ere this in your Museum at Cambridge. I trust it may be so. A line from you or the sight of any friend of yours is always cheering to me. Our friends Enniskillen and Egerton are both well. . . . I remain ever truly yours, Richard Owen. As has been seen by a previous letter from Sir Roderick Murchison, Agassiz tried from time to time to give his English friends more just views of our
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 21: 1865-1868: Aet. 58-61. (search)
ng this journey with his own Brazilian expedition almost half a century before. From Professor Martius. February 26, 1867. my dear friend,—Your letter of March 20th last year was most gratifying to me as a token of your affectionate remembrance. You will easily believe that I followed your journey on the Amazons with the greatest interest, and without any alloy of envy, though your expedition was undertaken forty years later than mine, and under circumstances so much more favorable. Bates, who lived for years in that country, has borne me witness that I was not wanting in courage and industry during an exploration which lasted eleven months; and I therefore believe that you also, in reviewing on the spot my description of the journey, will not have passed an unfavorable judgment. Our greatest difficulty was the small size of our boat which was so weak as to make the crossing of the river always dangerous. I shall look forward with great pleasure to the more detailed accoun
and telegraph lines, between Nashville and Murfreesboroa, and on the 3rd and 4th of December, he captured three stockades, as well as a train of cars on the Chattanooga railroad, and reported two hundred and sixty prisoners. So secure, indeed, did Hood now feel, that, on the 4th, he ordered Forrest to move with two divisions of cavalry, nearly his entire force, The enemy still holding Murfreesboroa with some 6,000 troops, Major-General Forrest, with the larger portion of the cavalry and Bates's division of infantry, was sent there to see if it was practicable to take the place.—Hood to Beauregard, January 9, 1865. On the morning of the 4th I received orders to move with Buford's and Jackson's divisions to Murfreesboro—Forrest's Report, January 24, 1865. and a division of infantry, against Murfreesboroa, thirty miles away. Forrest started on the morning of the 5th, and Thomas's cavalry force was then far superior to that which remained with Hood. On the 4th, the enemy exten
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the Western army in which Albama troops were engaged. (search)
roops, 16th, 20th, 30th, 36th, 37th, 40th Inf. Resaca, Ga., May 9. Gen. Canty. Alabama troops, Canty's brigade. Railroad, Ga., May 9. Gen. Wheeler: total loss 3.—Federal, total loss 22. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 8th Conf., and 53d, and Snodgrass' Battn, Inf. Near Varnell's, Ga., May 9. Gen. Wheeler; total loss 36.—Federal, Gen. La Grange; loss 100 m; total loss 260. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 8th Conf., 53d, and Snodgrass' Battn. Inf. Mill Cr. Gap, Ga., May O. Gen. Bates. Cleveland Rd., Ga., May 11. Gen. Jos. Wheeler; total loss 7.— Federal, Gen. Stoneman; total loss 40. Alabama troops, parts of 3d, 8th Conf. and 53d. Dalton, Ga., May 11. Gen. Jos. Wheeler; total loss 81.–Federal, Gen. Sherman, total loss 255. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 8th, 10th Conf. Rocky Face, Ga., May 12. Gen. Jos. Wheeler; total loss 12.—Federal, total loss go. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 8th, 10th Conf. Resaca, etc., Ga., May 13 to 16. Gen. Joh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
uld get it. First on the right, then through the siege, the Fifth Company battles for Atlanta, till Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longer. Here Frazer, Vincent, Delery, find their death, and also that unrecorded priest who followed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task, ill clad and badly shod. Columbia is taken, and Franklin's ditches are made level with Confederate dead. Bates's division is thrown toward Murfreesboro. At Overall creek it is Leverich's canister saving us from destruction, and riderless horses sweep in line of battle, through our intervals, to the rear. Siebrecht is buried on the field. The morrow finds us attacking with Forest, and yielding lines place the enemy in the rear. We lose two guns in running the gauntlet of their line. On that sad day Bennett is laid beneath the snow. Nashville follows, and after the defeat we spike our guns and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
uld get it. First on the right, then through the siege, the Fifth Company battles for Atlanta, till Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longer. Here Frazer, Vincent, Delery, find their death, and also that unrecorded priest who followed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task, ill clad and badly shod. Columbia is taken, and Franklin's ditches are made level with Confederate dead. Bates's division is thrown toward Murfreesboro. At Overall creek it is Leverich's canister saving us from destruction, and riderless horses sweep in line of battle, through our intervals, to the rear. Siebrecht is buried on the field. The morrow finds us attacking with Forest, and yielding lines place the enemy in the rear. We lose two guns in running the gauntlet of their line. On that sad day Bennett is laid beneath the snow. Nashville follows, and after the defeat we spike our guns and
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