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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 19: 1860-1863: Aet. 53-56. (search)
shall avail myself of opportunities for bringing myself to your recollection by such brochures as I have time for. One of them will open to your view something of the nature of the contest here waging to obtain for England a suitable Museum of Natural History, equivalent to her wealth and colonies and maritime business. In this I find you a valuable ally, and have cited from the Reports of your Museum of Comparative Zoology in support of my own claims for space. I was glad to hear from Mr. Bates that the Megatherium had not gone to the bottom, but had been rescued, and that it was probably ere this in your Museum at Cambridge. I trust it may be so. A line from you or the sight of any friend of yours is always cheering to me. Our friends Enniskillen and Egerton are both well. . . . I remain ever truly yours, Richard Owen. As has been seen by a previous letter from Sir Roderick Murchison, Agassiz tried from time to time to give his English friends more just views of our
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 21: 1865-1868: Aet. 58-61. (search)
ng this journey with his own Brazilian expedition almost half a century before. From Professor Martius. February 26, 1867. my dear friend,—Your letter of March 20th last year was most gratifying to me as a token of your affectionate remembrance. You will easily believe that I followed your journey on the Amazons with the greatest interest, and without any alloy of envy, though your expedition was undertaken forty years later than mine, and under circumstances so much more favorable. Bates, who lived for years in that country, has borne me witness that I was not wanting in courage and industry during an exploration which lasted eleven months; and I therefore believe that you also, in reviewing on the spot my description of the journey, will not have passed an unfavorable judgment. Our greatest difficulty was the small size of our boat which was so weak as to make the crossing of the river always dangerous. I shall look forward with great pleasure to the more detailed accoun