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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Notes. (search)
y each of the two parties. Before commencing the narration of the decisive battle of Gettysburg we provoked on the causes of Lee's defeat a discussion of this kind, which has been to us of great help; it has been published in the Southern Historical Society's Papers, thanks to the kindness of the editor, the Rev. J. Wm. Jones, who solicited on this point the opinion of some of the principal officers of the Confederate army. The special works of Hotchkiss and Allan on Chancellorsville, of Bates on Gettysburg—the one written from the Southern standpoint, the other from the Northern—as well as the maps published by the former and that of Bachelder of Gettysburg, have been for us invaluable guides. But the most useful documents for such a work are those which emanate from the actors themselves, and which are written at the first moment, when facts are too recent to allow any glossing of the truth. Unfortunately, the printed reports of Lee and his subordinates stop after the battle
ass. Hist. Coll. III. 398. In England the proclamation was but little regarded. The Puritans, hemmed in by dangers on every side, and at that time having no prospect of ultimate success, desired at any rate to escape from their native country. The privy council interfered to stay a squadron of eight ships, which were in the Thames, preparing to embark for 1638 May 1. New England. Rushworth, II. 409. Hazard, i. 122 It has been said that Hampden and Cromwell were on board this fleet. Bates and Dugdale, in Neal's Puritans, II. 349. C. Mather, b. i. c. v. s. 7. Neal's N. E. i. 168. Chalmers, 160, 161. Robertson, b. x. Hume, c. LIII Belknap, II. 229. Grahame's U. S. i. 299. Lord Nugent, in his Hampden, i. 254, should not have repeated the error. Edinburgh Review, No. 108. Russel's Cromwell, i. 51. Godwin, in his History of the Commonwealth, i. 11, 12, reproves the conduct which he unjustly imputes to Hampden. The pretended design was indeed unlike Hampden. The English min
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1860., [Electronic resource], English view of the late Royal visit. (search)
ember, 1860. Published by authority of Act of Congress, in the newspaper having the largest circulation in the District where printed. Persons calling for letters in this List, will please say they are Advertised. Ladies' list. Arnistead mrs Sarah Abernathy mrs S D Anderson mrs M A Anderson mrs Jane Allen mrs D Austin mrs Henry Andrews miss E S Allen miss M Allen miss Mary C Blakey mrs Mary E Ball mrs Ann Baily mrs Mary E Baily mrs Sarah Baugh mrs S G Bates mrs Mary A Berry mrsA Bell mrs Sarah D Boulding mrs Wood Biglow mrs A M Biunt mrs Emily C Bagg mrs Mary S Branch mrs Eliz'th Brannon mrs C Boge mrs Mary A Blackburn miss E Barnett miss M E Baily miss M E Blair miss H Black miss Julia B Branch miss Mary S Burke miss Marg't 2 Buck miss Jane Britton miss A Cannon mrs E Cassidy mrs Cooper mrs Eliz Cox mrs P L Cumine mrs Marg't Carter miss H R Christian miss S A Chandler miss H S Cobbs miss J
erson mrs M Alderslade mrs J M Allen mrs M A Adams mrs N F Alkins miss N W Anderson miss Cecilia Allen miss Nannie Allen miss C B Anderson miss B B Fall mrs Aug. Balley mrs Sempy Binford mrs Lucy A Bullock mrs Lucy Burroughs mrs G W Buchanan mrs Sarah E Ballard miss Fannie Barnes miss A M Barrett miss M A E Barber miss C A Brandon miss Lizzie Burch miss Marietta Brown mrs Sophia Brady mrs Brennan miss Burck miss Eliza Bates miss Pattie A Brooks miss Nancy Bowser miss Frances Crenshaw mrs F E Curry mrs Lucy L Crenshaw mrs Sarah B Campbell mrs E N G Carter mrs Mary E Caulfield mrs J A Caldwell mrs Caligan miss Maria Cullen miss Ellen Connolly miss Kate Cooke miss Sarah J Cook miss Mary A Cook miss Fannie Charters miss A V Clarke miss Delia Chandler miss M W Carter miss Georgie Carter miss H K Dillard mrs Wm Dixon mrs Martha Dillard mrs S F Do
The Immaculate Abe. In a late speech, to a committee of Philadelphians urging Mr. Cameron for a seat in the Cabinet, Mr. Lincoln said: "In the formation of my Cabinet, I shall aim as nearly as possible at perfection. I have already appointed Senator Seward, and Mr. Bates, of Missouri, and they are men whose characters. I think, the breath of calumny cannot impeach. Any man whom I appoint to such a position, must be, as far as possible, like CŒsar's wife, pure and above suspicion, of unblemished reputation and undoubted integrity. I will not have any man associated with me whose character is impeached." This is what we had a right to expect. We always understood from Old Abe's neighbors and friends that he was a pink of purity and decency, and that when a representative in Congress he never stooped to any job that brought on a vociferous remonstrance, signed by five hundred of his own party! By no manner of means! And therefore it is not at all wonderful that he shou
y amendment thereof, shall be constituted to give Congress power to legislate to abolish or control, within any State or Territory, the relation of slavery, nor the power to interfere with the slave trade," was offered as an adjustment. The Conference is in session to-night, and strong efforts are being made to come to a conclusion on the subject before adjournment. The most reliable report as to the construction of Lincoln's Cabinet is that Mr. Seward will be Secretary of State; Mr. Bates, or Missouri, Attorney General; Mr. Gilmore, of North Carolina, Secretary of the Navy; C. B. Smith, of Indiana, Secretary of the Interior; Mr. Wells, Postmaster General; Gen. Cameron, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of the Treasury. Several gentlemen are prominently mentioned for Secretary of War. The statement is thus communicated without vouching for its accuracy. Private advices received to-day from Montgomery say that very soon a Commissioner will be appointed by the Southern Confede
illains of the South, who have the insolence to take up arms rather than submit to the domination of that wise, cultivated, dignified, and polished martin-pole from Springfield. Why, why on earth cannot the South imitate the courageous patience of Virginia. and sit perfectly still until Seward has noiselessly wound the anaconda folds of the new Union party around their very vitals? I hear this morning from a good source that Cabinet places have been offered to only three men --Seward, Bates and Cameron. The first two have accepted; the latter is hesitating over the War Department. Mr. John Bell has signified his willingness to take a place, and I think he will get one. The pressure on Lincoln for and against Chase has been so great that on Sunday it is said he burst into tears and exclaimed, "My God! gentlemen, what shall I do?" How the Inauguration Ball came off I have not heard. Virginia office-seekers are pouring in. A few have resigned. It is windy, dusty, cool.
In Washington, Wednesday, the Vermont delegation called on Gen. Scott and Messrs. Seward, Dix and Bates. Gen. Scott made a speech in which he thanked Vermont for her Presidential vote in 1852.
The Daily Dispatch: March 22, 1861., [Electronic resource], Mr. Bates on the collection of the revenue. (search)
Mr. Bates on the collection of the revenue. --The St. Louis Democrat, of Monday, gives currency to a rumor that the Attorney General, Mr. Bates, has given the opinion to President Lincoln that the revenue cannot be collected, except under the law of 1809, which renders it necessary for collectors to reside within their respective districts, and therefore it will be impossible to execute the laws with propriety, even were it otherwise feasible, in vessels. Mr. Bates on the collection of the revenue. --The St. Louis Democrat, of Monday, gives currency to a rumor that the Attorney General, Mr. Bates, has given the opinion to President Lincoln that the revenue cannot be collected, except under the law of 1809, which renders it necessary for collectors to reside within their respective districts, and therefore it will be impossible to execute the laws with propriety, even were it otherwise feasible, in vessels.
respondent who telegraphed us yesterday that Lincoln had prepared a proclamation, including Alexandria in the fifth military district, received his information from several respectable gentlemen, who obtained the facts from the War Department. We have ourselves seen a Virginia gentleman who has been driven from Washington, who declares that he saw the proclamation himself, although it may have been since suppressed, and, from motives of policy, not yet acted upon. We also understood that Mr. Bates, the Attorney General of the Government, has given his opinion that the retrocession of Alexandria to Virginia was unconstitutional! Lincoln's whole object is to put us off our guard, and then to attempt our subjugation. We ought to be wide awake to this serpent-like and unscrupulous despotism. The people of Virginia have confidence that their dearest rights and interests will not be left open to the most false, hollow-hearted and cruel of mankind. At our head is the most approved
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