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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 11 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for George D. Bayard or search for George D. Bayard in all documents.

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ssable, he crossed the Alleghanies and descended into the Valley, reaching and occupying Strasburg on the evening of June 1st, just in time to be too late to head Jackson, who had retreated through that place a few hours before. Next morning, Gen. Bayard, Gen. McDowell, in his testimony aforesaid, blames Gen. Ord, commanding one of his divisions, for lack of energy in pushing it on from Front Royal to Strasburg, and adds, that he sent forward Gen. Shields from Front Royal with express orderp coming in from Front Royal and asked him how far out he had met Gen. Shields. He said he had rot met him at all. I told him he had started to go out, and he said he must have lost his way. Without stopping to see what had become of him. I took Bayard's cavalry brigade, the only one ready to move. and sent it forward by the direct road to Strasburg. I then went to see where Gen. Shields was, and found him over on the road toward Winchestar. He had sent his troops on that road, instead of on
from Waterloo Bridge to Culpepper, which Crawford's brigade of Banks's corps had already occupied for several days. Buford, with his cavalry, held Madison C. H., picketing the upper fords of the Rapidan, and as low down as Barnett's Ford; while Bayard was posted on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, near the Rapidan river, picketing the fords from Barnett's as low down as Raccoon Ford. The enemy crossing a considerable force in the vicinity of the junction of Buford's and Bayard's pickets, both Generals reported their advance; but it was some days before it was determined whether they were intending to advance in force on Madison C. H., or toward Culpepper C. H. On the 8th, the Rebels pressed Bayard's pickets, and his force fell back toward Culpepper C. H., followed by the enemy. Pope, under instructions to preserve his communications with Gen. King at Fredericksburg, ordered August 8. a concentration of his infantry and artillery upon Culpepper, his head quarters, and pushed
ion), of Ind., Willey, of West Va. (who wished the question of Emancipation submitted to a popular vote of the District), Kennedy, of Md., McDougall, of Cal., and Bayard, of Del.--was passed : April 3. Yeas 29 ; Nays 14-as follows: Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Browning, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Footowe, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, Morrill, Pomeroy, Sherman. Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, and Wilson, of Mass.--29. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Carlile, Davis, Henderson. Kennedy, Latham, McDougall, Nesmith, Powell, Saulsbury, Stark, Willey, Wilson, of Mo., and Wright--14. This bill having reachelso advocated the measure; and it passed Apr. 2.--Yeas 32 (including Davis, of Ky., Henderson, of Mo., Thomson [Dem.], of N. J., and Willey, of Pa.); Nays--Messrs. Bayard and Saulsbury, of Del., Kennedy, of Md., Carlile, of Va., Powell, of Ky., Wilson, of Mo., Wright, of N. J., Latham, of Cal., Nesmith and Stark, of Oregon. It
further orders, which he never in terms received; at least, not till it was too late to obey them with any hope of success. Franklin's grand division consisted of the two corps of Reynolds (16,000) and W. F. Smith (21,000), with cavalry under Bayard, raising it nearly or quite to 40,000. At 9 A. M., Reynolds advanced on the left; Meade's division, in front, being immediately assailed by Rebel batteries (J. E. B. Stuart's) on his left flank, which compelled him to halt and silence them. At Miss'g.Total. Hooker's grand division3272,4697483,548 Franklin's grand division3382,4301,5314,679 Sumner's grand division4804,1598555,494 Engineers74310050   Total1,1529,1013,23413,771 Not one of these died more lamented than Maj.-Gen. George D. Bayard, commanding our cavalry on the left, who was struck by a shell and mortally wounded; dying that night. But 28 years old, and on the eve of marriage, his death fell like a pall on many loving hearts. Lee at first reported his losses
nevitably intensified and made active the spirit of opposition to the War. Those who detested every form of coercion save the coercion of the Republic by the Rebels, with those who especially detested the National effort under its present aspects as a war not for the Union, but for the Negro, were aroused by it to a more determined and active opposition. The bill passed the House by Yeas 115, Nays 49--the division being, so nearly as might be, a party one--while in the Senate, a motion by Mr. Bayard that it be indefinitely postponed was supported by 11 Yeas (all Democrats) to 35 Nays: consisting of every Republican lican present, with Messrs. McDougall, of California, Harding and Nesmith, of Oregon. The bill then passed without a call of the Yeas and Nays. The President proceeding to constitute an enrolling board for each Congress district in the loyal States, and the Board to enroll those who were held to military service under its provisions, the repugnance to being drafted into
Ga., 634. Pumpkinvine Cr'k, Ga., 628. Rappahannock, Va.. 397. Raymond, Miss., 305. Reams's Station, Va., 593. Richmond, Ky., 214. Roanoke Island, N. C.. 76. Sabine X-Roads, La., 589. Sailors' Creek, Va., 741. Savage's Station, Va., 160. Selma, Ala., 718. South Mountain, Md., 195. Spottsylvania C. H., Va.,572. Vicksburg (assault), 311. Weldon Railroad, Va., 567. Wilderness, Va., 567. Williamsburg, Va., 122. Yazoo Bluffs, Miss., 289. [See Minor Conflicts, p. 775.] Bayard, Gen. Geo. D., reports advance of the enemy, 175; killed at Fredericksburg, 347. Baylor, Col., wounded at Bull Run, 189. Beatty, Lt.-Col. Sam., succeeds Van Cleve on his fall at Stone River, 279. Beauregard, Gen. P. G. T., 545; at Pittsburg Landing, 60; succeeds Johnston. 64; dispatches from, 66-70; extracts from his report of battle at Pittsburg Landing, 67, 69, 70; retreats to Corinth, 69-71; intrenches at, 71; retreats to Tupelo, 72; allusion to, 89; relinquishes command in Vir