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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 11 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George D. Bayard or search for George D. Bayard in all documents.

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Doc. 193. expedition to Drainesville, Va. Colonel Bayard's report. camp Pierpont, Va., Nov. 27, 1861. sir: In obedience to orders, I started from this camp yesterday, at nine o'clock in the evening, for the purpose of marching on Drained well, and I cannot but thus publicly express my admiration for their truly admirable behavior. Very respectfully, Geo. D. Bayard, Colonel First Penn. Regiment Cavalry. Colonel H. I. Biddle, A. A. G. General McCall transmitted Colonel Bayard'Colonel Bayard's report in the following words: Headquarters McCall's Division, November 27, 1861. Gen. S. Williams, A. A. G.: General: I have the honor to transmit herewith the report of Col. G. D. Bayard, First regiment Cavalry, Pennsylvania Reserve, of Col. G. D. Bayard, First regiment Cavalry, Pennsylvania Reserve, of a very successful expedition made during the last twenty-four hours, in the direction of Drainesville, where I had ascertained that a picket force of the enemy was stationed. The men who were sent by the colonel for ambulances, reported to me a str
cCalmont, was assigned to the duty. The force consisted of the Sixth regiment, Colonel W. W. Ricketts; Ninth regiment, Colonel C. F. Jackson; Tenth, Colonel John S. McCalmont; Twelfth, Colonel John H. Taggart. The regiment of riflemen known as the Bucktails, and under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas L. Kane; a battery of Colonel Campbell's artillery regiment, consisting of two twenty-four-pounders and two twelve-pounders, commanded by Capt. Easton, and a detachment of cavalry from Colonel Bayard's regiment, also accompanied the expedition. Each regiment was strongly represented, and it is supposed that there were about four thousand men in the expedition. The order for march was received on Thursday evening, the men being directed to take with them one day's rations. At six o'clock the men were under arms and ready to march. The morning was clear, and rather cold, with a slight mist around the sun, and a thin layer of frost whitening the road and coating the lawn. The Buckt