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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 22 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 11 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for George D. Bayard or search for George D. Bayard in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
ne, a little too late to intercept Jackson, for the latter had passed through that town a few hours before. Next morning Shields's vanguard of cavalry, under General Bayard, reached Strasburg, too late likewise for the intended service of interception. And now began a race up the Valley as exciting as the one down it ten days beant, mentioned in note 1, page 891, was kept in a blank book captured at this time, in which Colonel Wyndham had begun to enter copies of his military orders. General Bayard and Colonel Cluseret then pushed forward with cavalry and infantry, when Ashby, hard pressed, called for an infantry support. General Stewart's brigade was oFremont followed them closely June 9, 1862. in battle order, with Milroy on the right, Blenker on the left, and Schenck in the center. The brigades of Stahl and Bayard formed the reserve. In the mean time there had been stirring events at Port Republic. Jackson had crossed the Shenandoah, and was occupying the town when Frem
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
General S. W. Crawford went out from Culpepper, and drove the Confederates from Orange Court-House; and the Rapid Anna was picketed by the ,cavalry of Buford and Bayard from the foot of the Blue Ridge to the Raccoon Ford, eastward of the railway. Samuel W. Crawford. On the morning of the 8th August, 1862. Jackson had thrown and Jackson, with Stuart's cavalry, posting themselves at Beverly Ford, above Rappahannock Station. There had been some brisk skirmishing between the cavalry of Bayard and Stuart all the way from Cedar Mountain, but no very severe fighting excepting near Brandy Station, August 20. where the Nationals were worsted and driven acrfare Gap before King's division was attacked, and near its entrance, between it and Haymarket, had encountered Ricketts' division, with the cavalry of, Buford and Bayard, which had marched to confront him. An active engagement ensued, and ended only with the sunlight. The heaviest of the battle fell on the Eleventh Pennsylvania,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
Amisville, Jefferson, &c., with his pickets at Hazel River, facing Longstreet, six miles from Culpepper Court-House; and Bayard at Rappahannock Station. --See McClellan's Report, page 237. Burnside's sense of the magnitude of his trust made him . of his whole command, and many valuable officers were slain or wounded. General C. F. Jackson was killed; and General George D. Bayard, who commanded the cavalry on the left, was mortally wounded by a shell, and died that night. He was only twent age, and was on the eve of marriage. His loss was widely felt. General Gibbon was wounded and taken from the field. Bayard's brigade was famous for good deeds throughout the war. It was distinguished for gallantry in the following engagements beys, Cedar Mountain, Brandy Station, Rappahannock Station, Gainesville, Bull's Run, Warrenton, and Fredericksburg. After Bayard's death the brigade, was formed into a division, under General Gregg, and served throughout the campaigns in Virginia und