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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

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nt never opened his lips. He returned to Paris among his friends and relations, who lamented the singular infirmity he had brought with him from the army. Beauregard expressed only by signs. Physicians were sent for, but he refused their assistance. The captive king was at length restored to his people, but his joy on ller presented herself, and wrote to the king that she would undertake the restoration of the Chevalier to his speech. Being sent for she was introduced to Beauregard, when she addressed him thus: "Speak !" Beauregard immediately recognized in the stranger his beloved Aurelia, who had long witnessed his constancy anBeauregard immediately recognized in the stranger his beloved Aurelia, who had long witnessed his constancy and devotion. Francis was sensibly affected at the event, and presented him with a rich marriage portion. It is not now-a-days that men become dumb for love, though many keep silent for interest. There are few Beauregards in the present age.
Gen. Beauregard. The recent publication, in this paper, of a synopsis of Gen. Beauregard's report of the battle of Manassas, occasioned some discussion through the columns of a contemporary journal, in which we had no inclination to interfere.Gen. Beauregard's report of the battle of Manassas, occasioned some discussion through the columns of a contemporary journal, in which we had no inclination to interfere. The subjoined card, published in the Weig, of yesterday, is worthy of attentive persal Surely it ought to put a stop to all controversy in regard to the special subject referred to: A Gard from Gen.Beauregard. Centreville, Va.,(within beariGen.Beauregard. Centreville, Va.,(within bearing of the enemy's guns,) November 3, 1861. To the Editors of the Whig: Gentlemen --My attention has just been catted to an unfortunate controversy now going on relative to the publication of the synopsis of my report of the battle of Manasssecuring our rights and independence as a nation, is to retire into private life — my means then permitting — never again to leave my home, unless to fight anew the battles of my country. Respectfully, your most obd't serv't, G. T. Beauregard.