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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 98 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Peter G. T. Beauregard or search for Peter G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

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ring about 500 or 600 men. A large number of troops are being tendered to the Governor and President daily. If required, Alabama can furnish five thousand troops in a short time. Gen. Twiggs is expected here daily, and it is said, goes immediately to Charleston. He will probably be made Major General-in-Chief. Cola, Bragg and Johnston will also likely be Major Generals, and Col.C Wm. Henry Walker, of Ga., a Brigadier. During the secret session to-day the nomination of Gen. Peter G. T. Beauregard, of Louisiana, for Brigadier General of Provisional Army of the Confederate States, was confirmed, and secrecy removed. No other business was made public. President Davis will not allow civilians or West Point juniors to rank above West Point seniors, or citizens of the Confederate States who have heretofore seen service and who have resigned their commissions in the United States Army. Capt. Turney, of Tennessee, a son of the late celebrated Hopkins L. Turney, is i
Brigadier General Beauregard. Even the Black Republican press are forced to acknowledge the sagacity and energy which the Confederate States have displayed in their selection of a President and Vice President, and of their agents generally. One of the best proofs of this is their putting officers of the regular service at the head of their forces. We observe that Major Beauregard, one of the most accomplished officers of the late U. S. Army, who declined the Superintendency of West PointMajor Beauregard, one of the most accomplished officers of the late U. S. Army, who declined the Superintendency of West Point, that he might aid in the defence of his native State, Louisiana, has been appointed by the Confederate Government Brigadier General, and ordered to take command of all the forces at Charleston. In consequence of the foresight and energy of that heroic Commonwealth, South Carolina, there must be already an army of some ten thousand men in that State alone, well drilled, well equipped, and burning with impatience to meet the fee.
Visit to the fortifications. --Brigadier General Beauregard, in company with his Excellency Gov. Pickens, who was accompanied by several of his Aids, visited Fort Johnson, Cummings' Point Battery and Morris' Island Battery, on Monday morning. They returned about six o'clock in the evening. --We learn that Gen. Beauregard wasat Gen. Beauregard was very much struck with the great amount of work that had been done and the general progress and strength of the fortifications. They did not visit Fort Moultrie, but Gen. Beauregard expressed perfect confidence that Fort Sumter could be reduced, and that it was a question only of time.--Charleston Courtier. at Gen. Beauregard was very much struck with the great amount of work that had been done and the general progress and strength of the fortifications. They did not visit Fort Moultrie, but Gen. Beauregard expressed perfect confidence that Fort Sumter could be reduced, and that it was a question only of time.--Charleston Courtier.