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ritten imposing dispatches to Washington, describing the successes in his Department. The public, not then knowing that he had neither planned nor fought a single one of the battles he described, and had not even been under fire in Western Virginia, and that he was entitled to no more credit for any of those victories than the writer of this paragraph — the bewildered and appalled public, and the horribly frightened officials at Washington, who, in their nightly dreams, saw visions of Beauregard and the Black-Horse cavalry crossing the Long Bridge, instantly indicated McClellan as the man to supplant Mcllowell. Precisely why they called him they did not know, and I fancy they have not yet found out. But the war had hardly begun, and his department was the only one in which anything had been done; and, forgetting how cheap pen and ink are, they took it for granted that the author of such glowing dispatched must, in fighting qualities, be the ante-type of Frederick, of Bincher, of
was in supreme command, nobly assisted by Gen. Beauregard. The artillery was commanded by Brig hen they were brought in and delivered to Gen. Beauregard. I witnessed, also, the arrival and preshim, with his compliments, immediately to Gen. Beauregard. The following is the substance of the cur power to-day, and have had to yield. Beauregard.--That is natural, sir. You could not expectered into our calculations, and cannot. Beauregard.--The Union is already broken, and the man,re at the time we stopped your advance. Beauregard.--You are mistaken, General. My order of baovercome today the best troops we have. Beauregard.--I am glad to hear it, and trust that the reling, and that of our army and people. Beauregard.--You are very kind, sir; but we have much btermaster of the 53d Ohio regiment, which Gen. Beauregard has kindly assigned to two friends and myying their dead. The request was granted by Beauregard, and our own army will to morrow commence th[1 more...]
, and one piece of artillery. They have possession of the city and have effectually cut off all communication by that route. The 5th Georgia regiment had passed over the roads short time previous, and were all safely beyond Huntsville, except some few who were detailed to bring on baggage. Passengers by the Georgia railroad last night report that Huntsville has been occupied by eleven thousand Federal troops.--Two locomotives and trains of cars, loaded with troops going to reinforce Beauregard, were captured. All communication, except by way of Mobile, is cut off, if the report is true. Fight with the tories. The Knoxville Register, of Sunday last says a bush whacking fight, which lasted three days, came off last week between a detachment of Confederates under command of Col. Key, and the band of tories from Greene county, Tennessee, who have taken refuge in the mountains of the North Carolina border, and who have been occasionally sallying down into Greene, and commit
destroy her. From General Banks the War Department are in receipt of a dispatch which states that in General Jackson's rebel camp it was believed that General Beauregard was dead — It is probable, however, that there is some mistake in the news, and that the intelligence of the death of General A. S. Johnston which has been confirmed by General Beauregard's dispatch, has in some measure been confounded with that of Gen. Beauregard himself. Later intelligence from Port Royal indicates that the operations of Gen. Hunters department are progressing favorably; but to enable him to carry out to the fullest attend his programme, and facilitate mastereGen. Beauregard himself. Later intelligence from Port Royal indicates that the operations of Gen. Hunters department are progressing favorably; but to enable him to carry out to the fullest attend his programme, and facilitate mastered the coast, it is necessary that he should be speedily reinforced with fresh troops, and we presume the War Department is not blind to the necessity.
Gen. Beauregard. The name of Gen. Beauregard is associated with success. He is not only a sagacious, circumspect, and prudent, but a brave and aggressive soldier. He will suffer no grass to grow under his feet. No man excels him in single hearted devotion to the great cause of Southern independence, and no General of the South can be more safely trusted with the immense responsibilities confided to his hands. Gen. Beauregard. The name of Gen. Beauregard is associated with success. He is not only a sagacious, circumspect, and prudent, but a brave and aggressive soldier. He will suffer no grass to grow under his feet. No man excels him in single hearted devotion to the great cause of Southern independence, and no General of the South can be more safely trusted with the immense responsibilities confided to his hands.