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he Secesh to get hold of them and sent South as a relic, the way we do theirs. Direct your letters, "Sergeant Major William B. Stephenson, General Sherman's Division, Fifty-third Ohio Regiment. Paducah, Kentucky. Forward to regiment." Gen. Beauregard's Orders. Gen. Beauregard has just issued the following order from the headquarters of the Army of the Mississippi: For the sake of the cause in defence of which we are all engaged in this critical hour, the General Commanding is imGen. Beauregard has just issued the following order from the headquarters of the Army of the Mississippi: For the sake of the cause in defence of which we are all engaged in this critical hour, the General Commanding is impelled to appeal to the good sense and patriotism of the officers of this army to give prompt and zealous need and obedience to all orders emanating from superior authority. Implicit obedience to the orders of your superiors is the soul of discipline, and is essential to give unity, energy, success to military operations. With it an army becomes disciplined — a perfect, yet disciplined, machine, calm and steady amid the greatest danger, and easily wielded by its commanders. Without it, an ar
ated that the plan of the battle is commonly due to the genius of Beauregard, but I have no doubt that it was equally the result of the strate the centre by Gen. Bragg, and the rear by Gen. Folk Johnston and Beauregard being with the latter. Saturday night our troops lay upon thpersonal valor which made our troops invincible. On one occasion Beauregard himself, finding a regiment wavering under the rain of death thatst. Prudently the information was kept from the army, and Gen. Beauregard assured the command-in- chief. So the fight went on until foun account of the battle of Sunday. I believe I intimated that Gen. Beauregard anticipated a demonstration on the ensuing morning. Our scouthe Southern troops. Discovering the condition of affairs, Gen. Beauregard made his preparations to fall back. The wounded were sent bacd that Dr. Chapin, of New Orleans, who served on the staff of General Beauregard in Virginia, performed thirty one amputations on Sunday. Pro