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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 3, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

sufficient causes that prevented the advance of our forces and prolonged, vigorous pursuit of the enemy to and beyond the Potomac. The War Department has been fully advised long since of all of those causes, some of which only are proper to be here communicated. An army which had fought as ours on that day against uncommon odds, under a July sun, most of the time without water and without food except a hastily snatched meal at dawn, was not in condition for the toil of an eager, effective pursuit of an enemy immediately after the battle. On the following day an unusually heavy and unintermitting fell of rain intervened to obstruct our advance with reasonable prospect of fruitful results. Added to this, the want of a cavalry force of sufficient numbers made an efficient pursuit a military impossibility. Your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, General Commanding. To Gen. S. Cooper. Adj't and Inspec'r Gen., Richmond, Va. [Official.] R. H. Canton, Adj't.
General Beauregard's report. We publish this morning the official report of General Beauregard, of the battle of July 21st.It loses some of its interest from the fact that a portion of the introductory remarks has been stricken out by Congress; but it will yet repay perusal, and in giving it a place in our columns we are aware that we gratify the public desire. Taking all the facts into consideration, we cannot help thinking that the Government authorities have carried their reticence to General Beauregard, of the battle of July 21st.It loses some of its interest from the fact that a portion of the introductory remarks has been stricken out by Congress; but it will yet repay perusal, and in giving it a place in our columns we are aware that we gratify the public desire. Taking all the facts into consideration, we cannot help thinking that the Government authorities have carried their reticence to a point bordering on the absurd; and it is with no purpose of obliging them that we devote considerable space to the publication, at this late day, of reports that should have been given to the world while the incidents were fresh. We are rather influenced by a wish to place in the hands of our readers all that is requisite to complete the history of the most eventful year of the present century.
Gen. Beauregard. Much having been said recently in the newspapers about the movements of this officer, it is proper that the public should be made aware of the fact that he left Manassas on Friday last, at midnight, by a special train, for Lynchburg, on his way to the new post of duty to which he has been assigned. Whether that be Kentucky, New Orleans, or elsewhere, he will doubtless be heard from in due time.
Beauregard in Kentucky. --The Bowling Green Courier, says the announcement that Beauregard who assigned to Kentucky has caused a thrill of delight and astounding throughout the bunch. Under the load up this great General our brave men will be prepared to perform duties of heaved value worthy of their Beauregard in Kentucky. --The Bowling Green Courier, says the announcement that Beauregard who assigned to Kentucky has caused a thrill of delight and astounding throughout the bunch. Under the load up this great General our brave men will be prepared to perform duties of heaved value worthy of their
The battles of 1861official reports.the battle of Manassas. July 21, 1861.report of Gen. Beauregard. Hdq'rs 1st Corps army of the Potomac, Manassas, August 26, 1861. General: The War Department having been informed by me, by telegraph on the 17th of July, of the movement of Gen. McDowell--Gen. Johnston was immediately ordered to form a junction of his Army Corps with mine, should the movement, in his judgment, be deemed advisable. Gen. Holmes was also directed to push forward with two regiments, a battery, and one company of cavalry. In view of these propositions, approaching reinforcements modifying my plan of operations, so far as to determine on attacking the enemy at Centreville as soon as I should hear of the near approach of the two reinforcing columns, I sent one of my Aids, Col. Chisholm, of South Carolina, to meet and communicate my plans to Gen. Johnston, and my wish that one portion of his force should march by the way of Aldie, and take the enemy on his