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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Colonel Rates's regiment at thebattle of Shiloh. [from an Occasional correspondent.] Montgomery, Ala., June 7, 1862. While Beauregard and I were gaining that brilliant victory at Corinth, without fighting or letting the enemy or our own army know anything about it, I was gathering materials for a history of the battle of Shiloh from some of the heroic actors and survivors of that bloody, brilliant day. I am not joking about Beauregard's "victory," because the retreat was a great triumpBeauregard's "victory," because the retreat was a great triumph, if measured by its success, and the injury and loss inflicted on the enemy, which some of them, in spite of Halleck's lies, have had the grace to confess. We certainly "surprised" them, as well as ourselves. We lost some of our sick, who, in consequence of the "fall back." of course had a "relapse. " But, as to Shiloh, many incidents we hear daily which illustrate the undying (?) devotion of our soldiers to our holy cause, and prove how idle is the empty hope of Northern hordes to conq
the forces from the coast of Florida and Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas, and concentrate them at Corinth. This wing to be commanded by G. T. Beauregard, and to move in the direction of Paducah, with the intent of invading Illinois and Indiana. This plan was formed by a full council of leading traitors.st Fœmont's command in that direction — leading directly toward Pittsburg. And the evidence is overwhelming that all the forces from those States to constitute Beauregard's army at Corinth are concentrating there rapidly, with the design and hope of overpowering Gen. Halleck's army, and, if successful in the object, then moving ae and Kentucky. They are ready to act in gathering up all the Confederate forces that can be mustered, fully enforcing the conscript law in the States whenever Beauregard moves forward, and also to cut off the small detachment of Union forces stationed at various points in Kentucky and Tennessee, and small bodies that may be sent
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1862., [Electronic resource], Halleck's misrepresentations — Beauregard's Reply. (search)
Halleck's misrepresentations — Beauregard's Reply. We copy from the Mobile Evening News the communication of Gen. Beauregard. to which brief allusion has been made through the medium of the telGen. Beauregard. to which brief allusion has been made through the medium of the telegraph. It will be seen that the opinion heretofore expressed with regard to the falsity of Gen. Haileck's dispatches, is fully sustained by this straight-forward statement: Headq'rs Western s captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says that when Beauregard learned that Col. Elliott bad cut the railroad on his line of retreat he became frantic, and tHe ought to know that the burning of two or more cars on a railroad is not sufficient to make "Beauregard frantic" and ridiculous! especially when I expected every moment to hear of the capture of hiof the like opinion. I attest that all we lost at Corinth and during the retreat would not amount to one day's expenses of his army. Respectfully, your ob't serv't, G. T. Beauregard.
partment, and a strong wish expressed for a change in the commanding officer. The South Carolina troops are anxious to defend Charleston, and will do so successfully if they are permitted to. A report that we were to have the great services of Beauregard spread universal joy among the troops. If however, we cannot have Beauregard, we would be glad to get Huger, Magruder, Hill of N. C., Whiting, Gregg, Joseph R. Anderson, or any other first class General. change of some kind is necessary to r commanding officer. The South Carolina troops are anxious to defend Charleston, and will do so successfully if they are permitted to. A report that we were to have the great services of Beauregard spread universal joy among the troops. If however, we cannot have Beauregard, we would be glad to get Huger, Magruder, Hill of N. C., Whiting, Gregg, Joseph R. Anderson, or any other first class General. change of some kind is necessary to restore confidence to the troops and people. Palmetto.