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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3,199 167 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2,953 73 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 564 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 550 26 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 448 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 436 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 390 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 325 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 291 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 239 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 23, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for G. T. Beauregard or search for G. T. Beauregard in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

action as have come into our possession, which show that important advantages were goned by the gallant army under General Beauregard. We have some further particulars of the operations on the south side of the river. On Thursday night some inssful, despite the advantages of the enemy. Our column was under the immediate command of Gen. D. H. Hill, but General Beauregard was on the field, and his presence inspired an enthusiasm which rendered our men irresistible. The scene of the fialker is missing. It is feared he fell in the hands of the enemy while gallantly leading his troops into action. G. T. Beauregard. This official confirmation of the reports previously received caused universal rejoicing, and the publicventeen wounded and none killed. We learned at the War office last night that a dispatch had been received from Gen. Beauregard giving an account of the fate of Gen. Walker, reported missing in the first dispatch. It appears that he rode into
meaning which we do not yet fully understand. The prisoners report, also, the arrival of a division yesterday under Gen. Angur, composed of the sweepings of the hospitals, jails, and provost guard houses. These are believed to be the last reinforcements that can be sent to Grant, unless a portion of the forces operating in North Georgia and against Richmond from below are recalled. It is not improbable that the arrival of Augur's division, and intelligence of the defeat of Butler by Beauregard, may have influenced Grant to order the attack. Augur's troops, like Burnside's "black spirits and white," will be worth but little in the hour of trial. The number of wounded men left by the enemy in the two field hospitals, which he abandoned a few days ago was not 2,400, as I was informed at the time by a staff officer high in position, but 900. We still hold the battle field of the Wilderness and our badly wounded who were left there. When will Congress act upon the questio