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tinction, which will indicate the impression left by that address. The Tribune said: Mr. Sumner's speech last night was the greatest rhetorical and logical success of the year, and was most enthusiastically praised by the largest audience yet gathered in New York to hear a lecture. The interest was such that he was constrained, much against his disposition, to repeat it in Brooklyn, as he was afterwards at Niblo's Theatre in New York. In introducing him to the Brooklyn audience, Mr. Beecher said: I am to introduce to you a statesman who follows a long train of representatives and statesmen who were false to the North, false to liberty; then they made a complaint that there was no North! It was because the North lost faith in her recreant children. It lost faith in its traitors, and not in Liberty. Now, if the haughty Southerners wish to engage in any more conflict of this kind, I think they will have to find some other than the speaker to-night, with whom to break a l
tinction, which will indicate the impression left by that address. The Tribune said: Mr. Sumner's speech last night was the greatest rhetorical and logical success of the year, and was most enthusiastically praised by the largest audience yet gathered in New York to hear a lecture. The interest was such that he was constrained, much against his disposition, to repeat it in Brooklyn, as he was afterwards at Niblo's Theatre in New York. In introducing him to the Brooklyn audience, Mr. Beecher said: I am to introduce to you a statesman who follows a long train of representatives and statesmen who were false to the North, false to liberty; then they made a complaint that there was no North! It was because the North lost faith in her recreant children. It lost faith in its traitors, and not in Liberty. Now, if the haughty Southerners wish to engage in any more conflict of this kind, I think they will have to find some other than the speaker to-night, with whom to break a l
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
a scholar, as a statesman, and in general culture. He was a fine model for our American youth to emulate. He was a splendid example for the advancement of those principles which make true patriots. The genial Washington correspondent of Mr. Beecher's ,Christian Union— This house of his was as wonderful and as curious as the man himself. It was so crowded with all things rare and beautiful, and so many of them bore on their faces or carried in their hands a story they seemed longing is picture, and was told that it was either a very old copy, or possibly the original sketch from which Tintoretto painted the larger picture. I determined to have it at any price, and before I left the shop it belonged to me. And of him Mr. Beecher himself said, in one of his glowing discourses— The greatest gift of God to a nation is upright men for magistrates, statesmen, and rulers. That republic is poor, although every wind may waft to it the richest stores, that is not governed
a scholar, as a statesman, and in general culture. He was a fine model for our American youth to emulate. He was a splendid example for the advancement of those principles which make true patriots. The genial Washington correspondent of Mr. Beecher's ,Christian Union— This house of his was as wonderful and as curious as the man himself. It was so crowded with all things rare and beautiful, and so many of them bore on their faces or carried in their hands a story they seemed longing is picture, and was told that it was either a very old copy, or possibly the original sketch from which Tintoretto painted the larger picture. I determined to have it at any price, and before I left the shop it belonged to me. And of him Mr. Beecher himself said, in one of his glowing discourses— The greatest gift of God to a nation is upright men for magistrates, statesmen, and rulers. That republic is poor, although every wind may waft to it the richest stores, that is not governed