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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 16 8 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
R. Breese, Fleet Captain. Lieut. M. W. Sanders, Signal Officer. Lieutenant S. W. Terry and Lieutenant S. W. Preston (k), Aides. First division, Commodore Henry K. Thatcher; Second division, Commodore Joseph Lanman; Third division, Commodore Jas. Findlay Schenck; Fourth division, Commodore S. W. Godon; iron-Clad division, Commodore Wm. Radford. Flag-ship. Malvern, Lieut. William B. Cushing (1st attack); Lieut. B. H. Porter (k), (2d attack). Iron-Clads. Canonicus, Lieut.-Com. George E. Belknap. Mahopac, Lieut.-Com. E. E. Potter (1st attack); Lieut.-Com. A. W. Weaver (2d attack). Monadnock, Com. E. G. Parrott. New Ironsides, Commo. William Radford. Saugus, Com. E. R. Colhoun. Screw frigates. Colorado, Commo. H. K. Thatcher. Minnesota, Commo. Joseph Lanman. Wabash, Capt. M. Smith. Side-wheel steamers (1st class). Powhatan, Commo. J. F. Schenck. Susquehanna, Commo. S. W. Godon. Screw sloops. Brooklyn, Capt. James Alden. Juniata, Capt. W. R. Taylor (1st a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ry, La Rue P. Adams and Frederick Pearson; Acting-Master's Mates, Wm. A. Duer, W. F. Horton and Joel R. Hinman; Engineers: Chief, Robert W. McCleery, Acting-Second-Assistant, J. B. Hathaway; Third-Assistants, J. S. Green, Thomas Crummey; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. L. Marshall, J. B. Place and J. T. Dennett; Boatswain, Zachariah Whitmarsh; Gunner, Thomas Stewart; Carpenter, Charles Bordman; Sailmaker, G. T. Lozier Iron-clad steamer New Ironsides. Captain, Thomas Turner; Lieutenant-Commander, Geo. E. Belknap; Lieutenant, H. B. Robeson; Surgeon, Marius Duvall; Assistant Surgeons, W. T. Plant and Edward Kershner; Paymaster, Alex. W. Russell; Marine Officers: First-Lieutenant, H. A. Bartlett; Second-Lieutenant, J. B. Young; Acting-Masters, G. W. Domett, J. M. Skillings and J. M. Butler; Acting-Master's Mates, C. W. Howard, G. H. Bradley, S. S. Hand, T. E. Harvey, B. F. Morris and Robert Shepherd; Engineers: Chief, Harmon Newell; First-Assistant, N. B. Littig; Second-Assistants, O H.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
tion Lieutenant H. B. Robeson, Acting-Masters George W. Domett and John M. Skillings, Ensign B. H. Porter and Acting-Ensign Charles W. Howard are spoken of in terms of the highest praise for their coolness and manly bearing; while Lieutenant-Commander George E. Belknap, the executive officer of the Ironsides, is highly lauded for his zeal and ability in putting the vessel in such an efficient fighting condition, and for the hearty manner in which he had carried out Captain Rowan's orders as comm like a cigar, being supplied with a small engine and propeller, and was of the following dimensions: Length, fifty feet; beam (or diameter), nine feet. For offence, a torpedo was carried at the end of Lieutenant-Commander (now Commodore) George E. Belknap, executive officer of the Ironsides. a stout spar, extending some fifteen feet ahead of the sharp bow. When the attempted destruction of the Ironsides occurred, that vessel was anchored off Morris Island, and the time, 9:15 P. M., was on
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
ttle and T. H. Daggett; Acting-Master's Mates, J. H. Gordon, J. C. Graves, Joseph Gregory and B. O. Carpenter; Engineers: Fleet Engineer, Robert Danby; Second-Assistants, P. R. Voorhees, W. C. Williamson and Elisha Harsen; Third-Assistants, J. S. Green, H. H. Kimball, A. Michener and J. B. Place; Boatswain, Francis McLoud; Gunner, Christopher Long; Carpenter, J. G. Thomas; Sailmaker, H. W. Frankland. Iron-clad steamer New Ironsides. Captain, Stephen C. Rowan; Lieutenant Commander, Geo. E. Belknap; Lieutenant, H. B. Robeson; Surgeon, Marius Duvall; Assistant Surgeon, Edw. Kershner; Paymaster, Alex. W. Russell; Marines: First-Lieutenant, Henry A. Bartlett; Second-Lieutenant, James B. Young; Acting-Masters, G. W. Domett, Lewis West and J. M. Skillings; Ensigns, H. L. Johnson, J. J. Read and Walter Abbot; Acting-Ensigns, W. C. Wise, G. T. Davis, S. S. Hand and W. S. McNeilly; Acting-Master's Mates, J. W. Caswell, J. D. Wingate and Thomas Hollins; Engineers: Chief, Alex. Grier; First
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
ommand: Commodore William Radford, commanding New Ironsides; Commander E. S. Parrott, commanding Monadnock; Commander E. R. Colhoun, commanding Saugus; Lieutenant George E. Belknap, commanding Canonicus; Lieutenant-Commander E. E. Potter, commanding Mahopac. There are about one thousand men left on shore by the army who have noin D. B. Ridgely; Seneca, Lieutenant-Commander M. Sicard; New Ironsides, Commodore William Radford; Monadnock, Commander E. G. Parrott; Canonicus, Lieutenant-Commander George E. Belknap; Mahopac, Lieutenant-Commander E. E. Potter; Saugus, Commander E. R. Colhoun; Nyack, Lieutenant-Commander L. H. Newman; Unadilla, Lieutenant-Commarove the men from the guns in the fort, they only firing one or two guns, and those at long intervals. All the Monitors were handled and fought well. Lieutenant-Commander Belknap took the in-shore berth, and is reported to have dismounted one or more guns in the fort Judging from the immense number of shells which struck the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
nding the Saugus, Lieutenant-Commander A. W. Weaver, commanding the Mahopac, and Lieutenant-Commander George E. Belknap, be promoted. These officers have given a world-renowned name to the Monitors, :29 A. M. on the 13th instant. The Monadnock, Commander E. G. Parrott; Canonicus, Lieutenant-Commander G. E. Belknap; Saugus, Commander G. R. Colhoun; and Mahopac, Lieutenant-Commander A. W. Weaver. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Report of Lieutenant-Commander George E. Belknap. United States Steamer Canonicus, off Fort Fisher, N. C., January 17, 1865he attempt been made to occupy it. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, George E. Belknap, Lieutenant-Commander, Commanding. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic SqThird-Assistants, W. M. Bartram and J. C. Veatch. *Canonicus--Third-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, George E. Belknap; Lieutenant, R. S. McCook; Acting-Masters, D. S. Murphy, E. S. Goodwin and E. A
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Potter, Chandler Eastman 1807-1868 (search)
Potter, Chandler Eastman 1807-1868 Author; born in Concord, N. H., March 7, 1807; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1831; editor and publisher of the Manchester Democrat in East Concord, in 1844-48; was also connected with other periodicals. His publications include History of Manchester, N. H.; a new edition of Belknap's History of New Hampshire, with notes and a continuation to 1860; and contributions on the Penobscot and other Eastern Indians in Schooleraft's History of the Indians. He died in Flint, Mich., Aug. 4, 1868.
ritical circumstances. In the midst of difficulties and dangers his judgment seemed most reliable.. General Palmer led the advance from the White Oak Swamp, and made excellent dispositions, of which I am happy to make mention. Colonel Russell, Seventh Massachusetts, was in advance of the advance as usual, and exhibited his anxiety to meet the foe with his fine regiment. Colonels Farniman, Ninety-sixth New York; Lehman, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania; Rose, Eighty-first New York; Belknap, Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania; and Lieutenant-Colonel Durkee, Ninety-eighth New York, are all meritorious officers who have rendered the country good service, and exert a salutary influence upon their troops. Colonel Greggs, Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, was of great assistance in these movements, scouring the country and watching the enemy. Captain Keenan, Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, deserves especial notice for untiring and valuable services. When he was in the saddle no movement of the e
the effect of their shells is terrific. The following are the names of the commanders, and I hope I shall ever keep them under my command: Commander E. G. Parrott, commanding Monadnock; Commander E . . Calhoun, commanding Saugus; Lieutenant George E. Belknap, commanding Canonicus; Lieutenant Commander E. E. Potter, commanding Mahopac. There are about one thousand men left on shore by the army, who have not been got off yet, on account of the surf on the beach. These will be got off in ight previous, took her station, and this division, in connection with the others, drove the men from the guns in the fort, they only firing one or two guns, and those at long intervals. All the monitors were handled and fought well. Lieutenant Commander Belknap took the inshore berth, and is reported to have dismounted one or more guns in the fort. Judging from the immense number of shells which struck the fort, it must have been considerably injured. Several guns were reported to have be
ter, Corn. E. P. Williams, Lieut. S. W. Preston, Capt. Geo. W. Rodgers). H. Clay Trumbull. United Service Mag., vol. 1, p. 32. — In The monitors; with plans and illus. John Ericsson. Century, vol. 31, p. 280. — New Ironsides off. Capt. Geo. E. Belknap. United Service Mag., vol. 1, p. 63. — Short account of New Ironsides; eighteen months in harbor; with list of officers. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 1, p. 747. Charlestown Navy Yard. 1861. Ships and ordnance there at date. Boser Gen. Butler. Hero in spite of himself; story. Bivouac vol. 1, p. 3. New Ironsides, U. S. steamer, at Fort Fisher, N. C. In Two battle pictures. Dr. Edward Shippen, U. S. N. United Service Mag., vol. 4, p. 53. —Off Charleston. Capt. Geo. E. Belknap. United Service Mag., vol. 1, p. 63. —Short account of her eighteen months in Charleston harbor; with list of officers. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 1, p. 747. New Market Heights (Chapin's Farm), Va. Engagement of Sept. 28-30,
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