hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 520 results in 149 document sections:

... 10 11 12 13 14 15
e South. Not only the men keep aloof from them, and regard them with stern and unfriendly aspect, but the children look upon them as they would wild beasts, and the ladies entirely avoid their presence. They have invented various stories, doubtless for the purpose of justifying some contemplated atrocities of incidents in illustration of the hatred of the population to them; but, true or false, it is certain that a wide and impassable gulf rolls between them and the people of the South. John Bell so long known as an inflexible friend of the old Union, is the representative of his whole party in Tennessee, and, we may add, his whole country; and with such men blended heart and soul with original Secessionists in the war of independence, we do not wonder that the Yankees are not satisfied with the acquisition of such cattle as Parson Brownlow and Andy Johnson. The ministers of the gospel in Nashville, Alexandria, and elsewhere, have set an example in patriotism, as in religion,
Jefferson West, of Harrison county, a late member of the Virginia Legislature, has also been arrested. The steamer Rhode Island arrived at Boston on the 23d from New Orleans, with forty passengers, including the officers of the Confederate navy, captured at New Orleans. In Washington, on the night of the 22d, the Provost guard made a descent upon Hall's gambling-house, making several arrests and capturing all the sporting apparatus. It is stated in the Northern papers that John Bell and Jere Clemens contemplated visit to Washington, "to make arrangements for reestablishing peace in the Southwest." A fire occurred in Alexandria, Missouri, on the 18th instant, which destroyed the Delta City Hotel and eight houses, stores and warehouses. "Governor" Edward Stanly, accompanied by a Massachusetts parson, sailed from New York for Beaufort, N. C., on the 28d. In the latest New York stock reports, Tennessee 8's are quoted at 58½ a 59; Virginia 6's 57 a 58½ North
From the South. Hon. John Bell, of Tennessee, whose home has been occupied by the Yankees, is now at Talladega, Ala. The Yankees have robbed him of about forty negroes and $80,000 worth of other property. The Quincy (Fla). Dispatch says that about fifty men have armed themselves and banded together in Calhoun county, Fla., to resist the conscription act. --They got arms from the off the coast. The Federals in Tennessee are coming over to our side in great numbers. A letter from Capt. Kerr, at Kingston, Tenn., says: Yesterday, a Federal Major, who formerly lived in this county, came here and surrendered to me. --I sent him to Knoxville to take the oath and give bond. He informed me that our brigade was at London, Ky., where they had captured 400 horses, 600 mules, and 70 prisoners, 101 wagons loaded with arms, ammunition, and commissary stores.--The rest of the train guard "skedaddled." He also informed me that Col. Scott's dispatch, stating the above facts, had been ca
Hon. John Bell has returned to his home in Tennessee, that region being free from Yankees just
Hon. John Bell. --The correspondent of the Journal and Messenger, writing from Rome, under date of the 19th ult. says: At Rome I had the pleasure of meeting with the Hon. John Bell, who has been driven from his home and estates in Tennessthe Hon. John Bell, who has been driven from his home and estates in Tennessee, and is now living with his family in a modest little village near Rome. Mr. Bell is quite advanced in years, and yet looks ruddy and hale. He is truly a fine looking old gentleman and of most agreeable presence. He is by no means hopeful of a Mr. Bell is quite advanced in years, and yet looks ruddy and hale. He is truly a fine looking old gentleman and of most agreeable presence. He is by no means hopeful of a speedy termination of our troubles. Mr. Bell has two sons in the army. I met with one of them at Rome. years, and yet looks ruddy and hale. He is truly a fine looking old gentleman and of most agreeable presence. He is by no means hopeful of a speedy termination of our troubles. Mr. Bell has two sons in the army. I met with one of them at Rome.
t the South we can discern the under crust rapidly hopping to the surface, laden with native vulgarity and acquired plunder.-- The Picayune says: Nearly all the lately received Northern papers contain the following: "Two daughters of John Bell, of Tenn, in Philadelphia, express themselves amazed at the indications of abundance and prosperity every where evident." The paragraph seems to be very popular, for it is going the rounds of the entire press. --Its presumed object is to mprivation and even a want of the necessities of life, may well be amazed at the abundance and prosperity not only "evident," but actually arising from and produced by war." These things have amazed many persons besides "the two daughters of John Bell, of Tennessee," They have amazed New York, Boston, and Philadelphia editors, engaged from day to day in chronicling the extravagance of Shoddymites, who are purchasing diamonds by the pint almost, and who are offering Church and Bierstadt thous
ht for their country. The question of equality need not now be settled. If they are our equals we can't help it, and if they are not we should regret it, as it is not their fault, and they are entitled to our sympathy. The Constitution of the United States knows no difference, except in a provision made for Indians. Colored men in Maine, New Hampshire, and in many other States have all the rights and privileges of a white man. They voted in Maryland and North Carolina at one time. John Bell said he was twice elected to Congress by negro votes.--It is entirely a new idea that they are not citizens, originating with Judge Taney in his decision in the Dred Scott case. They are a great instrument of power, having mental and physical ability combined with a strong motive to fight for the Union as it ought to be. It is no time to quibble about these matters of etiquette, while the life-blood of our nation is being sought. The rebels having abdicated their country without a just c
the charge of having given General Hampton the information upon which that general captured Grant's drove of beeves last summer. From the Valley. So far as the movement of troops in the Valley is concerned, all is again quiet save the steady advance of our picket lines. On Tuesday week, the 8th instant, a number of the most prominent citizens of Winchester, among them Rev. Dr. Boyd; Robert Y. Conrad, Esq., formerly a member of the Virginia Convention; and Phil Williams, Esq; Mr. John Bell, a merchant; Jacob Miller, and others, were arrested by order of Sheridan.--They were allowed to take each a carpetbag of clothing and some bed- clothes, and were told they might expect a long sojourn in Yankee land. No reason was assigned for their arrest. From East Tennessee. General, Breckinridge reports that, on the evening of the 11th, he drove the enemy from Lick creek into Bull's gap, and the next morning forced them back a mile, and captured a line of works, but was una
The Columbus (Mississippi) Republican says that Miss Bell, daughter of the Hon. John Bell, Mrs. and Miss Woods, of Nashville, have arrived there. During the middle of November they went from Nashville to Columbia, waited at the latter place until General Hood captured it, and then came South. The Charleston Mercury understands that Sherman has given the citizens of Savannah fifteen days grace to settle up their bank and other accounts which are to be balanced by Confederate treasurthe Hon. John Bell, Mrs. and Miss Woods, of Nashville, have arrived there. During the middle of November they went from Nashville to Columbia, waited at the latter place until General Hood captured it, and then came South. The Charleston Mercury understands that Sherman has given the citizens of Savannah fifteen days grace to settle up their bank and other accounts which are to be balanced by Confederate treasury notes. The warehouse of Vanambridge & Co., at Wilmington, North Carolina, was destroyed by fire, with three thousand barrels of rosin, on the 2d instant. The Virginia Salt Works will be in operation again in two weeks.
... 10 11 12 13 14 15