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. That the Journal, Democrat, Anzeiger, Courier, and all the peace papers in the State are requested to publish the proceedings and resolutions of this meeting. The following gentlemen were appointed an Executive Committee: Wm. P. Campbell, Wm. Terry, J. S. Lithgow, Jas. Bridgeford, John Bell, Wm. Inman, B. H. Hornsby, A. A. Gordon, D. Spalding, Jr., D. B. Leight, Emanuel Lieberman, and E. S. Worthington. On motion, the meeting adjourned. James Trabue, President. John Bell, Secretary. 8. That the Journal, Democrat, Anzeiger, Courier, and all the peace papers in the State are requested to publish the proceedings and resolutions of this meeting. The following gentlemen were appointed an Executive Committee: Wm. P. Campbell, Wm. Terry, J. S. Lithgow, Jas. Bridgeford, John Bell, Wm. Inman, B. H. Hornsby, A. A. Gordon, D. Spalding, Jr., D. B. Leight, Emanuel Lieberman, and E. S. Worthington. On motion, the meeting adjourned. James Trabue, President. John Bell, Secretary.
rce. Early on Friday a steamer was seen approaching, which, as soon as she got in sight of the Conestoga, took to her heels. The Conestoga gave her chase, and she was soon run ashore, her officers and crew scampering over the bluffs. She turned out to be the Jefferson, a small stern wheel boat, with a heavy load of tobacco, valued at eight thousand dollars. On the next day she captured a stern wheeler, a fine boat, the John Gault; also a small dinkey, called the Pocahontas, belonging to John Bell, of Tennessee. These prizes are all safely moored at Cairo. The battery of the telegraph was not found. The wires had been cut by the rebels a few miles beyond the burned railroad bridge. Several large coils of telegraph wire were seized at Paducah by our troops. The stampede of the inhabitants from Paducah was astonishing and immense, and ere this scarcely a hundred families are left here, out of a population of from fifteen to twenty thousand people. On Friday and Saturday Main
M., services on Frying-Pan Shoals, 343; describes passage of forts, 366; as member of Lafourche confiscation committee, 521; a provost judge, 526; token of esteem given by New Orleans bar, 540; on Butler's staff, 893; reference to, 897. Bell, Capt., John, cuts chain cable in Mississippi, 363; passes the forts, 365. Bendix, Col. John E., at Big Bethel, 269, 270, 275. Benham, General, brings pontoon bridge to City Point, 683-684. Benjamin, Judah P., Confederate Secretary of War, 435; Chickahominy River, Colonel West drives enemy from, 645. child, Linus, interview with regarding ten-hour ticket in Lowell, 103. Chittenden tests the law on greenbacks 954-956. Choate, Hon., Rufus, quoted 33, tribute to, 64; partner of Major Bell, 526; in the Storm King Scurvy case, 1018-1020. Cilley, Abigail, grandmother of Benj. F. Butler, 41; adopted by, 48-49. Cilley, Gen., Joseph, great-grandfather of Benj. F. Butler, 41. Cincinnati Gazette, market reports of, 940. Cinc
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
Burning of,119 78.Gen. Scott's Letter to Secretary Floyd,121 79.Baltimore--Mayor Brown's Statement,123 80.Rhode Island Regiment; Gov. Sprague,124 81.Wendell Phillips' Speech, April 22,125 82.Californians--Meeting in New York,131 83.Liverpool Times--Article on the Conflict,132 84.Secretary Seward to Gov. Hicks,133 85.Baltimore--Attack on Massachusetts Troops,133 86.Baltimore, An Embargo at,134 87.A. H. Stephens' Speech at Richmond, April 22,134 88.New York Bar, Meeting of,135 89.John Bell and E. H. Ewing's Speeches, April 23,137 90.New Orleans Press, Opinions of,138 91.South Carolina, 1st Regiment of,139 92.Robert J. Walker's Speech, April 23,139 93.N. Y. 8th, 13th, and 69th Regiments, departure of,141 93 1/2.Gov. Hicks' and Gen. Butler's Correspondence,144 94.Gov. Magoffin's (Kentucky) Proclamation,144 95.Gen. Cass' Speech at Detroit, April 24,145 96.Caleb Cushing's Speech, April 24,145 97.Gov. Letcher's Proclamation, April 24,146 98.Van Dorn's Capture of N. Y. T
at Manassas, Va., D. 91; notice of, D. 93; orders relating to Captain Ball, D. 103; general orders after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, Doc. 63; Booty and Beauty proclamation, Doc. 839; proclamation compared with that of General Butler, Doc. 839; an epigram, P. 96; the ubiquity of, P. 96 Bedford, N. Y., flag-raising at, D. 46 Bedford (Va.) Yankee Catchers, P. 71 Beech, A. C., & A. B., of Nashville, Tenn., repudiate their debts, P. 38 Bercher, Henry Ward, D. 38 Bell, John, address to Tenn., D. 30; a traitor, D. 41; in the Washington conspiracy, D. 59; speech at Nashville, Tenn., Doc. 137 Bellows, H. W, D. D. D. 38, 96; Doc. 311 Beman, John, huns, P. 148 Bendix, John E., Colonel 7th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., D. 98; Doc. 273 Benjamin, J. P., secession speech of, in the U. S. Senate, D. 8; his failing at college, P. 20; attorney-general, C. S. A., correspondence with Captain C. Lee Moses, P. 132 Bennett, James Gordon, Jr., commission
ion. I left Fort Donelson yesterday with the Conestoga, Lieut. Commanding Phelps, and the Cairo, Lieut. Commanding Bryant, on an armed reconnoissance, bringing with me Col. Webster of the Engineer Corps, and chief of Gen. Grant's staff, who, with Lieut. Commanding Phelps, took possession of the principal fort and hoisted the Union flag at Clarksville. A Union sentiment manifested itself as we came up the river. The rebels have retreated to Nashville, having set fire, against the remonstrances of the citizens, to the splendid railroad-bridge across the Cumberland River. I return to Fort Donelson to-day for another gunboat and six or eight mortar-boats, with which I propose to proceed up the Cumberland. The rebels all have a terror of the gunboats. One of them, a short distance above Fort Donelson, had previously fired an iron rolling-mill belonging to Hon. John Bell, which had been used by the rebels. A. H. Foote, Flag-Officer, Commanding Naval Forces, Western Waters.
st the value of the services rendered by them. Lieut. Hall receives high commendation from those who witnessed his management of his battery, as do also those who assisted him. Capt. McRae having passed from this stage of action, his name having been recorded among those of the world's heroes, and his memory enshrined in the hearts of his countrymen, we will not here attempt to add even a spark to the lustre of a fame early won and to be worn throughout time. His lieutenants, Michler and Bell, stood by the brave captain until all was lost beyond redemption. The former was killed — the latter escaped with a very slight wound. Lieutenants Anderson and Nicodemus are said to have acted with great gallantry. The former had his horse shot under him by a cannon-ball, but fortunately escaped without personal injury. There may be some officers who were engaged in the action, the omission of whose names here would be an act of injustice, and if such should be the case, it arises f
es towards Des Are, killing several and taking prisoners. All along the route, he found the house filled with the dead and wounded; curb-stones were wet with blood, and in one case, even the water of the well was crimson with gore. Gen. Benton's force consisted of the Eighth Indiana, Col. Shunk; a section of Manter's battery, First Missouri light artillery, Lieut. Schofield; part of the Eleventh Wisconsin, Major Platt; one howitzer from Bowen's battalion; the Thirteenth Illinois cavalry, Col. Bell, and a battalion of the Fifth Illinois cavalry under Major Apperson. After the battle, and while the wounded were being collected and cared for, another body of rebels appeared on the Bayou De View road and drove in our pickets. I immediately sent Lieut.-Col. Wood, of the Eleventh Wisconsin, with a force of infantry, and the First Indiana cavalry, to pursue and capture them. He proceeded to Bayou De View, shelled the rebels from their camp, and prevented the burning of the bridge, on
g numerous officers killed and wounded, we have to mourn the loss of Col. Henry W. Kingsbury, Eleventh Connecticut; Lieut.-Col. A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh O. V. I.; Lieut.-Col. M. Clark, commanding Thirty-sixth regiment O. V. I., and Lieut.-Col. Bell, commanding Fifty-first Pennsylvania. All these gallant officers were killed in the action whilst heroically leading their men under a terrible fire of shell, canister and musketry. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. D. Cox, Bese engagements. Both officers and men behaved with the greatest gallantry, and I cannot help expressing the pride I feel in commanding such valiant soldiers as they have proved themselves. I have to mourn the loss, in this last battle, of Lieut.-Col. Bell, of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania volunteers, a gallant and efficient officer and amiable gentleman — killed at the stone bridge by a shell. Lieut.-Col. Carruth, of the Thirty-fifth Massachusetts, was slightly wounded. I annex a list of k
g numerous officers killed and wounded, we have to mourn the loss of Col. Henry W. Kingsbury, Eleventh Connecticut; Lieut.-Col. A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh O. V. I.; Lieut.-Col. M. Clark, commanding Thirty-sixth regiment O. V. I., and Lieut.-Col. Bell, commanding Fifty-first Pennsylvania. All these gallant officers were killed in the action whilst heroically leading their men under a terrible fire of shell, canister and musketry. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. D. Cox, Bese engagements. Both officers and men behaved with the greatest gallantry, and I cannot help expressing the pride I feel in commanding such valiant soldiers as they have proved themselves. I have to mourn the loss, in this last battle, of Lieut.-Col. Bell, of the Fifty-first Pennsylvania volunteers, a gallant and efficient officer and amiable gentleman — killed at the stone bridge by a shell. Lieut.-Col. Carruth, of the Thirty-fifth Massachusetts, was slightly wounded. I annex a list of k
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